Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming

Installation view of Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming, Camden Arts Centre, 2018.

Rhythm defines Giorgio Griffa’s work. Throughout the Camden Arts Centre’s gallery spaces, from his earliest, late 1960s work to his more recent output, his bright, repeated gestures mark the raw canvases in sequences and patterns. The rhythmic quality is emphasised by the folds of his unstretched canvases, starkly visible, which segment the surfaces of the paintings into something like a score. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Hauser & Wirth Zürich, Limmatstrasse 270, 8005 Zürich

Larry Bell Venice Fog: Recent Investigations

Installation view, 'Larry Bell. Venice Fog: Recent Investigations', Hauser & Wirth Zurich, 2018

A fixation with glass structures and their interactions with light have dominated Larry Bell’s practice throughout his career. In his latest exhibition, Venice Fog: Recent Investigations, at Hauser & Wirth, Zürich, Bell continues his fascination with this material, drawing inspiration from the atmospheric fog of Californian mornings. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

No, No, No, No

No, No, No, No Installation View, 2018

Through the use of verbal and visual puns, the works displayed in ‘No, No, No, No’ convey irony and humour, and challenge the audience by playing with ideas of authorship, making and presenting art, and even appropriating existing artworks. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Margaret Salmon: Circle

Installation view, Margaret Salmon: Circle, Tramway, Glasgow, 2018

American Glasgow-based artist Margaret Salmon’s filmic, atmospheric and carefully rendered installation, sensitive to the nuances of people, the subtleties of places and objects (and her relationships to them) is housed in Tramway’s immense principal space. It renders the space quieter than normal, in half-light – a place for a rare, esoteric experience. Review by Alex Hetherington

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LADA

LADA Screens - Martin O’Brien

The Unwell, by Martin O’Brien and Suhail Ilyas, takes us into an apocalyptic landscape inhabited only by strange, coughing bodies, and is part of Martin’s ongoing exploration of the figure of the zombie as a metaphor for the sick body.

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Public spaces around Europe and Iran – Darbast Platform

Tara Fatehi Irani: Mishandled Archive

Mishandled Archive, Tara Fatehi Irani, Tehran (2018)

What we see and hear in ‘Mishandled Archive’ is not limited to one narrator – several voices are heard. It is as if we are wandering in the aural and visual space of a polyphonic text that relieves the many voices of its characters from a singular dominant authority. Review by Helia Hamedani

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Nest, in collaboration with Stichting Electriciteitsfabriek, De Constant Rebecqueplein 20, 2518 RA The Hague, Netherlands

Zoro Feigl: Infinity

Pressurising 2010

Whether extended to hang loosely, to bumble about on the floor or transport veils of colourful gunk skyward, the works in Zoro Feigl's latest exhibition, Infinity, at the Nest, The Hague, in collaboration with Stichting Electriciteitsfabriek, demonstrate that their power resides in their ability to enthrall and maintain a poetic presence. Review by John Gayer

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Lisson Gallery, 138 10th Avenue, New York

Channa Horwitz

Installation view of Channa Horwitz at Lisson Gallery, New York

In the first exhibition at Lisson Gallery, New York, by Californian artist Channa Horwitz, her seminal Sonkinotography series of permutational drawings, created from1968 until her death in 2013, are presented. The exhibition shows an artist who in 1969 had her early compositions dismissed by a critic of the Los Angeles Times as 'Pretty Notations by Valley Housewife' finally receiving the recognition that she deserves. Review by Grace Storey

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Lydia Ourahmane: The you in us

Lydia Ourahmane, In the Absence of our Mothers (2018). Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

A golden tooth is unassumingly mounted on a pin, sticking out of the wall. A cabinet with documents is standing next to it. In the middle hangs an x-ray. It takes another moment to realise a low humming is coming from the floorboards. It finds resonance with the room, with the bodies in it, and creates a feeling of being ‘within’ something latently present. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Hestercombe Gallery, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton, Somerset TA2 8LG

Odyssean: Topographies

Natasha Rosling and Vilma Luostarinen, Edible Coastlines, 2018.

Beginning high up in the Orkney Isles and journeying to the South West of England, ‘Odyssean: Topographies’ is a cognitive, visual and, at times, physical expedition into hidden and imagined spaces. The culmination of four artists' Orkney-based residencies, the exhibition throws into question the ways in which humans formulate perceptions of nature and place in an era rife with technology. Review by Selina Oakes

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650mAh, Mist Vape Shop, 41 Western Road, Hove, BN3 1JD

Jack Lavender - Sorry I haven’t been

Jack Lavender, Untitled (car cover, stereo, lights, resin statue), 2018

LED lights trace the floor’s edge and bathe the room in a purple haze. The beams evoke the luminescence of whizzing cars on the motorway and trigger nostalgic memories of long night-time drives and the open road – Lavender’s car hurtles down a motorway of a bygone time. Review by Sophie Ruigrok

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