Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Mat Collishaw: Thresholds

Thresholds, early test visualisation

In the context of Photo London, the artist has brought together the vanguard of Victorian visual technology with current developments in virtual reality programming. Review by Cleo Roberts

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White Rainbow,47 Mortimer St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8HJ

Minimalist Anyway | Kazuko Miyamoto and Lydia Okumura

Minimalist Anyway, Installation view at White Rainbow, London, 2017.

‘Minimalist Anyway’ held at White Rainbow presents a dialogue between the works of two artists with Japanese origins: Lydia Okumura and Kazuko Miyamoto, considering how the legacy of minimalism has impacted upon the reading of their work. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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Rowing, 3 Leighton Place, London NW5 2QL

Rory Pilgrim

Rory Pilgrim, Software Garden, installation view

Pilgrim’s exhibition is based on the idea that technology, like ecology, can facilitate beneficent exchanges between its users. The show’s main feature is a short film (22 minutes) also called ‘Software Garden’ (2017), which takes the structure of the diverse environment of a garden by combining work from a number of collaborators. Review by Henry Broome

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Hannah Barry Gallery, 4 Holly Grove, Peckham, London SE15 5DF

Oliver Griffin

H Demonstrations of Patterns in Flow What do you expect from your surfaces. A philosophy of Bicycle MotoCross (BMX) and everything. Installation view.

On the wall, hung off-centre in a 3 x 3 grid that recalls the conventional arrangement of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s water towers and grain elevators, are nine risograph prints. They belong to a series of photographs taken by Griffin at a flatland BMX competition in 2015, not of the riders or their performances, but of the streaks whorled by skidding tyres. Review by Kit Webb

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Spike Island, 133 Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6UX

Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Common Ground

Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Common Ground, installation view at Spike Island, 2017

‘Common Ground’ showcases the importance of place in Andrea Luka Zimmerman's practice. At the centre of the exhibition is Zimmerman’s film ‘Estate, a Reverie’ (2015). It tracks the drawn out closure of the Haggerston Estate in East London, where Zimmerman lived for 18 years. Review by Helen Cobby

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AirSpace Gallery, 4 Broad Street, City Centre, Stoke-on-Trent ST1 4HL

Victoria Lucas: Lay of the Land (and other such myths)

Victoria Lucas, Lay of the Land (and other such myths), installation view at AirSpace Gallery

The spectral colours of ‘Psychedelic Western #3’ (2015) provide a rich exhibition excerpt – its vibrant and effervescent depictions of the Alabama hills are repeated in the show's wall-sized prints and theatrical screens. A feminine sigh welcomes you into the space, while deceptively light boulders – made from layers of polystyrene, fibreglass and jesmonite – catch your eye as they glisten under the gallery's spotlights. Selina Oakes reviews

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Turf Projects, Keeley Rd, Croydon CR0 1TF

Paul Schneider: Ways of Seeing

Installation view, Ways of Seeing at Turf Projects

A simplicity of form is the essence of ‘Ways of Seeing’, Paul Schneider’s solo show at Turf Projects in East Croydon. Screen Beans, the now extinct graphics of the 90s Microsoft Office populate the gallery space of Turf Projects over and over again creating an immersive virtual experience. Review by Zoe Marden

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Athens, Greece

Documenta 14: Athens

Rebecca Belmore, Biinjiya'iing Onji (From inside), 2017, marble, Filopappou Hill, Athens, documenta 14

Documenta 14: 'Learning from Athens' promised to address some of the current social and political issues facing Europe today by questioning its foundations: colonialism, patriarchy, gender-normativity and capitalism. Yet many feared that the exhibition tried to glamorise the ‘Greek crisis’ and capitalise on what is a very complex and difficult social and economic situation. What’s in it for Athens? Review by Anaïs Castro

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Fabrica, Duke St, Brighton BN1 1AG

Ipek Duben: THEY / ONLAR

Ipek Duben: THEY / ONLAR, installation view at Fabrica, 2017

‘Onlar,’ in English, means ‘they’ but artist Ipek Duben says the word translates more accurately to ‘everyone who is not like us.’ In her multi-screen video installation ‘They/Onlar’, Duben presents the experiences of Turkey’s ‘others’: Kurds, Alevis, Armenians, Jews, Rum and Romanis as well as LGBT and covered women. Review by Ashley Janke

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Cubitt Gallery, 8 Angel Mews, Islington, London N1 9HH

Houses are really bodies: escape, defiance and friendship in the writing of Leonora Carrington

Houses are really bodies: the writing of Leonora Carrington, installation view, Cubitt Gallery, London, 2017.

In the contemporary, the idea of ‘sanctuary’ is an interesting one. Helen Nisbet’s use of the word when describing ‘Houses are really bodies’, her debut installation as Cubitt’s latest Curatorial Fellow, strikes chords that place the show both within a dense history and at the forefront of the present. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Firstsite, Lewis Gardens, High St, Colchester CO1 1JH

Zhang Enli: Gesture and Form

Zhang Enli: Gesture and Form, installation view at Firstsite, 2017

A site-specific painting, made over a ten-day period by Chinese artist Zhang Enli, wraps the entirety of Firstsite Gallery’s 140-meter curved interior wall. All year, the work will ensconce visitors in a teeming landscape comprised of Chinese and British trees. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, Treitlstraße 2, 1040 Vienna, Austria

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses, installation view at Kunsthalle Wien, 2017.

Before entering Camille Henrot’s solo exhibition ‘If Wishes Were Horses,’ the viewer is required to remove their shoes. While this serves the practical function of not damaging the floor, it is also an intimate gesture with associations of religious worship, the comfort of being at home, privacy, or even sensuality. Review by Deborah Krieger

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