Viewing articles tagged with 'Toronto'

Birch Contemporary, 129 Tecumseth Street, Toronto, Canada

Soon Comes Night

Soon Comes Night, installation view at Birch Contemporary, courtesy the artists and Birch Contemporary

Soon Comes Night explores images as an unfixed entity – between light and dark, abstract and representational, constructed and incidental.

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Ydessa Hendeles: The Milliner’s Daughter

Ydessa Hendeles, detail from THE BIRD THAT MADE THE BREEZE TO BLOW (Aero-Car No. 500), 2011. Automaton sculpture with key, displayed in mahogany-and-glass vitrine, 511 x 253 x 369 cm.

In her solo show currently on at The Power Plant, Ydessa Hendeles performs the simultaneous roles of collector, curator and artist. ‘The Milliner’s Daughter’ is a complex exhibition showcasing Hendeles’ interest in fables and stories. Her work investigates how narratives, from cultural narratives to fairy tales, inform our individual and collective identities and structure our perceptions of the world. Emma Rae Warburton reviews

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Olga Korper Gallery, 17 Morrow Avenue Toronto M6R 2H9, Canada

Paterson Ewen

Installation view, Paterson Ewen, Olga Korper Gallery

Apart from a single lithographic print, the exhibition presents pieces that were all produced during the 1990s, and together they powerfully illustrate the artist’s interest in space, astronomy, cosmic events, and the phenomenal relationship between our physical world and the celestial environment that surrounds it. Review by Emma Rae Warburton

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man, installation view at The Power Plant, Toronto, 2017

In his solo exhibition at the Power Plant, Jonathas de Andrade astutely mines the racialized socio-economic conditions specific to north-eastern Brazil in order to explore the ways in which archetypes, ideologies and fictions both conceal and construct lived experience. Review by Alex Borkowski

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay West, Toronto, Ontario M5J 2G8 Canada

Kapwani Kiwanga: A wall is just a wall

Kapwani Kiwanga: A wall is just a wall. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2017. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

As we go about our daily lives, we enter into and are confronted by spaces designed to shape and regulate our behaviour, whether we notice it or not. It is this architecture of control that informs Kapwani Kiwanga’s solo exhibition at The Power Plant.

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Christopher Cutts Gallery, 21 Morrow Ave, Toronto, ON M6R 2H9, Canada

Michael Snow: Powers of Two

Powers of Two

Snow is arguably one of Canada’s most internationally famed contemporary artists, known most commonly for his innovative work in film and video. ‘Powers of Two’ also brings together more recent sculpture and photo-based work with a refreshing collection of rarely seen early drawings and illustrations. Review by Emma Rae Warburton

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& A FOREST 8-11, 233 Spadina, Toronto / (PETRIFIES) 820 Plaza, 6820 rue Marconi, Montreal

Félicia Atkinson: & A FOREST (PETRIFIES)

& A FOREST at 8-11 (Toronto). Installation view (Detail).

& A FOREST (PETRIFIES) is a fiction, a poem, an exhibition by Félicia Atkinson, initiated by Corinn Gerber of Passenger Books and presented by 8-11 and 820Plaza.

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Susan Hobbs, 137 Tecumseth Street, Toronto M6J 2H2

Brian Groombridge: dd/mm/yyyy

Brian Groombridge, dd/mm/yyyy, installation view at Susan Hobbs, 2016

All the works in 'dd/mm/yyyy' present a structure that must be interpreted by the viewer, as if one were scrutinizing an unfamiliar alphabet. The only work in the show with words in it, a quote from Aristotle’s ‘Nichomachean Ethics’ is about being just, temperate and brave. Review by Robert Fones

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Birch Contemporary, 129 Tecumseth St, Toronto, ON M6J 2H2

New Monuments Forget the Future

New Monuments Forget the Future installation view at Birch Contemporary 2015

In his 1966 essay ‘Entropy And The New Monuments’, Robert Smithson describes an architectural imagination that is fixated on the present. ‘New Monuments Forget the Future’ returns to the text with a meditative exhibition studying the changing cityscape. Rowan Lear reviews.

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Mercer Union, a centre for contemporary art, 1286 Bloor Street West, Toronto M6H 1N9

Krista Belle Stewart: Seraphine, Seraphine

Krista Belle Stewart, Seraphine, Seraphine, 2015

Complex issues surrounding the misty ‘truths’ of the documentary genre, the confrontation of uncomfortable national histories and more intimate family pasts are raised in Krista Belle Stewart’s current installation at Mercer Union. Review by Rebecca Travis

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Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 1G4

Introducing Suzy Lake

Suzy Lake, Extended Breathing While Highlights Travel, 2009

‘Introducing Suzy Lake’ is the first large-scale exhibition to comprehensively address the influential artistic production of the American-Canadian artist Suzy Lake, whose early investigations were at the frontline vein of feminism in art. Review by Sam Ackerley

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