Viewing articles tagged with 'New York'

Transfer Gallery, 1030 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life installation view

Contrary to the exhibition’s title, which suggests a state of stasis, Holberton’s work oscillates between analogue and digital, animate and inanimate, in order to destablise the notion of these binaries, and explore the possibility of a third space. Review by Grace Storey

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Met Breuer, 945 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now)

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) at the Met Breuer, 2018

Like Life, current on view at the Met Breuer, is a sweeping paean to historical contemporaneity, but where crowded chaos or a pandering sense of prurience could easily reign, co-curators Sheena Wagstaff and Luke Syson manage to imbue the eerie magic of mimesis with an academic bent that won’t intimidate fair-weather tourists. Review by Torey Akers

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Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W 17th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

A Lost Future

A Lost Future, 2018 installation view

Currently at the Rubin Museum, New York, is A Lost Future, a yearlong exhibition on view through January 28th, 2019, showcasing explorations of the future, a theme that in this context is applied specifically to Bengal and South Asia by Shezad Dawood, Matti Braun, and the Otolith. Review by Louis Soulard

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Art in General, 145 Plymouth St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA

Zach Blas: Contra-Internet

Zach Blas, Jubilee 2033 (film still) 2018. Commissioned by Gasworks, London; Art in General, New York; and MU, Eindhoven

Zach Blas’ debut US solo show, Contra-Internet, at Art in General, New York, is a 28-minute long film, ‘Jubilee 2033’, inspired by the opening sequence of Derek Jarman’s seminal queer punk film ‘Jubilee’ (1978). Blas’ film imagines the jubilee of the internet in 2033 and evidences his broader endeavour ‘to explore contemporary technology in relationship to feminism and queerness’. Review by Grace Storey

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage

Photo caption - Installation view, 2018 Triennial: “Songs for Sabotage”

While each painting on view in the 2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage, at the New Museum, New York, might pack a punch on its own, when grouped, this pervasive, globalized homogeneity only undercuts the swollen pomp ascribed to Songs of Sabotage by its organizers, and points, perhaps, to a more sinister condescension afoot in the galleries themselves. Review by Torey Akers

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Lisson Gallery, 138 10th Avenue, New York

Channa Horwitz

Installation view of Channa Horwitz at Lisson Gallery, New York

In the first exhibition at Lisson Gallery, New York, by Californian artist Channa Horwitz, her seminal Sonkinotography series of permutational drawings, created from1968 until her death in 2013, are presented. The exhibition shows an artist who in 1969 had her early compositions dismissed by a critic of the Los Angeles Times as 'Pretty Notations by Valley Housewife' finally receiving the recognition that she deserves. Review by Grace Storey

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014, USA

Laura Owens

Untitled, 2015 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York)

The Whitney Museum of American Art has historically positioned itself in the public imagination as an incontrovertible arbiter of taste, the sort of claim that makes its stale, self-consciously presentist choices all the more discouraging. As such, the Laura Owens retrospective currently on view feels less like the mid-career survey of a serious painter and more like an overblown Instagram backdrop, a pandering move that undercuts Owens’ contributions and reasserts the Whitney’s distance from artistic innovation. Review by Torey Akers

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Pace Gallery, 510 West 25th Street, New York NY 10001

Elizabeth Murray: Painting in the ‘80s

Installation view of Elizabeth Murray: Painting in the '80s 510 West 25th Street, New York

In the 1980s a new generation of painters had broken through. The pieces were big, the personas even bigger. Names like Fischl, Salle, and Schnabel became not just salient, but sexy. While this landscape hardly embraced women participants, innovators like Elizabeth Murray, the subject of an excellent retrospective currently on display at Pace’s 25th St. location in Chelsea, transcended dismissal through persistence.

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Matthew Marks Gallery, 523 W 24th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Gary Hume: Mum

Ripe

Matthew Marks is pleased to announce Gary Hume: Mum, the next exhibition in his gallery at 522 West 22nd Street. This body of work focuses on a range of subjects, but at its core is a suite of highly personal paintings about memory and loss. Hume’s mother is 86 years old and suffers from dementia. And while the ostensible subjects of many of the new paintings are flowers, their titles — Mourning, Spent, Blind — reflect Hume’s thoughts of her.

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Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 West 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Nina Chanel Abney: Seized the Imagination

Nina Chanel Abney: Seized the Imagination installation view 2017

There seems to be a dichotomous relationship between specificity and standardization at play in Seized the Imagination. While occasional zeitgeist-adjacent signifiers prove easy to recognize, the activity afoot isn’t immediately identifiable. Review by Torey Akers

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Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, NY 10011

Hayv Kahraman: Re-weaving Migrant Inscriptions

Hayv Kahraman: Re-weaving Migrant Inscriptions installation view 2017

In Re-weaving Migrant Inscriptions at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, Hayv Kahraman’s material treatment of characters is important – pale, nude bodies and homogeneous features contextualize them in the annals of visual history, but while their faces look opaque, their bodies, suspended in the negative space of raw linen, feel ghostly, merely outlining the promise of a form. Review by Torey Akers

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Alexander Gray Associates, 510 West 26 Street, New York NY 10001

Polly Apfelbaum: The Potential of Women

  Polly Apfelbaum: The Potential of Women, installation view, Alexander Gray Associates (2017)

In Polly Apfelbaum’s first show at Alexander Gray Associates, The Potential of Women, the artist borrows both the title and central design symbiology from the decades-old symposium’s accompanying publication. Her appropriation of this essentialist feminine image, denoted as such by the suggestion of a bob haircut, signals a further call to equity while contemplating the scope of modern identity politics itself. Review by Torey Akers

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MoMA, 11 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019

Walid Raad

Installation view of Walid Raad, The Museum of Modern Art, October 12, 2015-January 31, 2016

Widely noted, the role of fiction in Walid Raad’s practice takes a lead throughout his mid-career retrospective at MoMA. Review by Gemma Sharpe

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 24 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Sunset Décor - Curated by Magalí Arriola

Sunset Décor 2017 Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Installation view

At a time when populations, cultures and the environment are fighting to resist conservative thinking and political assault, Sunset Décor puts into perspective the instrumentalization, now as then, of nature, the individual and the land for the production of a symbolic order in the name of freedom, civilization and democracy.

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