Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Charlemont House, Parnell Square North, Dublin 1, D01 F2X9, Ireland

Amanda Dunsmore: Keeper

Amanda Dunsmore, John Hume, 2005; installation view, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

In light of seismic political events, and the failed attempts to square the circle that is the Irish Border, Amanda Dunsmore’s exhibition ‘Keeper’ in Dublin’s Hugh Lane seems increasingly vital and brings the Good Friday Agreement into sharper focus. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstraße 7, 10963 Berlin

Covered in Time and History: The Films of Ana Mendieta

Sweating Blood

Ana Mendieta remains a significant artistic figure of the 1970s and 1980s because of her radical practice encompassing performance, gender and geo-political identity. The extensive self-documentation of her performances (which were often enacted alone) on primarily Super 8 film has allowed for her works to survive to this day. Review by Joan Lee

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT

Mario Merz, 2002 by Tacita Dean. 16mm colour film, optical sound, 8 minutes, 30 seconds. Film still.

The glance, with its speed and lack of resolution, is probably the defining characteristic of contemporary vision. We see people with the same lack of depth, quickly skimming across their seemingly shallow surfaces. The experience of viewing Tacita Dean’s ‘PORTRAIT’ at the National Portrait Gallery, on the other hand, is more like the process of reading than the ways in which we usually contemplate visual art; the whole show seems to provide a slow, even still, contemplative corrective to the incessant pace of modern life. Review by Matthew Turner

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences

15 days by Imran Perretta as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences exhibition at Jerwood Space until 3 June

This year’s Jerwood/FVU Awards sees Maeve Brennan and Imran Perretta engage with the theme of ‘Unintended Consequences’ by considering, in very different ways, the complex nexus of vision, knowledge and representation. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Sondra Perry: Typhoon coming on

Sondra Perry, Installation view, Typhoon coming on, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London, 6 March - 20 May 2018

‘Typhoon coming on’ is the first solo presentation of Sondra Perry’s work in Europe. For those unfamiliar with the artist, one may find themselves swimming against the purple ocean waves projected across the gallery walls in search of Sondra – in search of healing that feeling of uncertainty in an art gallery, amplified by the disorientating, dizzying, environment we’ve found ourselves trying to navigate. Review by Cairo Clarke

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Cubitt, 8 Angel Mews, London N1 9HH

Hardeep Pandhal: Liar Hydrant

Hardeep Pandhal, Liar Hydrant Mood Board detail, Cubitt Gallery, 2018.

The video works layer lurid cartoons, psychedelic narratives and deadpan rap music; they are accompanied by production drawings and a sculpture. Edmée Lepercq reviews Hardeep Pandhal's solo exhibition at Cubitt.

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Lilah Fowler: nth nature

Lilah Fowler: nth nature, 2018

The city is striated into manifold ordered grids that similarly control our movements. The Nevada desert on the other hand, one of the locations Lilah Fowler explored for her show at Assembly Point, has no such boundaries and borders – it has an order more in common with a modulating weather system than any Cartesian geometry. Review by Matthew Turner

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Hazel Brill

Hazel Brill, Woke Up in Spring, 2018, Mixed media video installation, 9 mins. Solo Invites exhibition, 1 March - 8 April 2018.

Hazel Brill’s new video installation ‘Woke Up in Spring’ presents a compendium of media and cultural references that build up a layered picaresque of the artist’s exploration of her environment. Review by Piers Masterson

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Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 140 George St, The Rocks NSW 2000, Australia

21st Biennale of Sydney: SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

21st Biennale of Sydney, SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement installation view

Artistic Director Mami Kataoka utilizes the concept of Superposition as a metaphor for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Superposition is a theory borrowed from quantum mechanics, it posits that different, even seemingly conflicting, components are held in suspension - equal in their difference and vital to the whole. This metaphor seeks to bring the different threads, directions, contradictions and loose-ends that exist in our contemporary world into a (utopian) balance. Review by Kathleen Linn

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Actions. The image of the world can be different

Installation view, Rana Begum

Kettle's Yard in Cambridge re-opens following a multi-million pound redevelopment of its galleries and public spaces and takes this question, and its possible answers, as a starting point. It features the work of 38 practitioners whose works fill the galleries, the on-site historic house and a nearby church, as well as occupying space online and being emblazoned on the uniform of the front of house staff. This exhibition is expansive. Review by Ryan Hughes

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out_sight, GF, 12, Changgyeonggung-ro 35ga-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul, S.Korea

Mitra Saboury: Filthy Middles

Installation view, Mitra Saboury, Filthy Middles, Out_Sight Gallery, Seoul

Cleaning as we know it secures a homogeneous space that is removed of all otherness. However, when Mitra Saboury rubs, flosses, dusts and swipes things in her videos, her body as the subject of cleaning ends up revoltingly contaminated with the filth. Instead of eliminating dirt and grime, Saboury’s body becomes part of the mess. Text by exhibition curator, Jinho Lim.

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Wysing Arts Centre, Fox Rd, Cambridge CB23 2TX

more of an avalanche

Wysing Arts Centre, more of an avalanche, installation view, 2018

The exhibition takes the most ubiquitously right wing of pejorative terms – “snowflake” – as its conceptual springboard: the works here reclaim this insult from the political right by embracing and unabashedly exploring it. Empathy for your fellow humans and a willingness to speak up against pernicious injustice are embraced as strengths to celebrate, rather than mocked as signs of hypersensitivity and an inability to cope with ‘real life’. Review by Helena Haimes

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Oriel Davies Gallery, The Park, Newtown, SY16 2NZ

Freya Dooley: Speakable Things

Freya Dooley, Speakable Things, Oriel Davies, 2018

‘Speakable Things’, Freya Dooley’s newly commissioned sound and moving image work for Litmus at Oriel Davies, is installed within a room painted a deep pink comparable to the inside of a mouth. It is an intimate colour for an intimate space, measuring less than 2m². The mouth repeatedly appears throughout ‘Speakable Things’, as blank space interrupts out-of-sync close ups and scenes of wild landscape. Freya is interested in the voice as something in-between inside and outside, sound and language, thought and body. Text by Litmus Curator Louise Hobson

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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