Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Oriel Davies Gallery, The Park, Newtown, SY16 2NZ

Freya Dooley: Speakable Things

Freya Dooley, Speakable Things, Oriel Davies, 2018

‘Speakable Things’, Freya Dooley’s newly commissioned sound and moving image work for Litmus at Oriel Davies, is installed within a room painted a deep pink comparable to the inside of a mouth. It is an intimate colour for an intimate space, measuring less than 2m². The mouth repeatedly appears throughout ‘Speakable Things’, as blank space interrupts out-of-sync close ups and scenes of wild landscape. Freya is interested in the voice as something in-between inside and outside, sound and language, thought and body. Text by Litmus Curator Louise Hobson

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Margaret Salmon: Circle

Installation view, Margaret Salmon: Circle, Tramway, Glasgow, 2018

American Glasgow-based artist Margaret Salmon’s filmic, atmospheric and carefully rendered installation, sensitive to the nuances of people, the subtleties of places and objects (and her relationships to them) is housed in Tramway’s immense principal space. It renders the space quieter than normal, in half-light – a place for a rare, esoteric experience. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Hestercombe Gallery, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton, Somerset TA2 8LG

Odyssean: Topographies

Natasha Rosling and Vilma Luostarinen, Edible Coastlines, 2018.

Beginning high up in the Orkney Isles and journeying to the South West of England, ‘Odyssean: Topographies’ is a cognitive, visual and, at times, physical expedition into hidden and imagined spaces. The culmination of four artists' Orkney-based residencies, the exhibition throws into question the ways in which humans formulate perceptions of nature and place in an era rife with technology. Review by Selina Oakes

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Rotterdam, Netherlands

International Film Festival Rotterdam

SLEEPCINEMAHOTE installation view IFFR 2018

The International Film Festival Rotterdam 2018, now in its 47th edition, flirts with the boundaries of art and film throughout the city with powerful and exciting works by Nicolas Provost, Hiwa K, Agnieszka Polska and Artur Zmijewski among others. But just how far does the synthesis between cinema and fine art achieve new experiences in viewing? Review by Laurence Scherz

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Chelsea Space, 16 John Islip St, London SW1P 4JU

Ian Giles: After BUTT

Installation view, Ian Giles: After BUTT. Image courtesy Ian Giles and Chelsea Space, copyright Rob Harris

When does a cultural artefact – a magazine, a film, an artwork – cease to be considered what we might call ‘contemporary’ and enter the realm of the historical? A minute ago? Yesterday? The turn of the millennium? Once its creator/s have passed away? Not until it starts to have what might be called a legacy? Helena Haimes reviews ‘After BUTT’ by Ian Giles, new film currently showing at London’s Chelsea Space.

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Pump House Gallery, Battersea Park, London SW11 4NJ

Sriwhana Spong: a hook but no fish

Sriwhana Spong, a hook but no fish installation view, 2017.

Sophie Risner reviews a presentation of work by Sriwhana Spong which takes the work of twelfth century female mystic named Hildegard von Bingen as its central reference point.

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Ilona Sagar: Correspondence O

Still from Correspondence 0, Ilona Sagar 2017.

Like conducting an autopsy of her own subject matter, Ilona Sagar projects her film ‘Correspondence O’ on to a split screen, cut down the middle and opened out. The rest of the room is dark like an operating theatre after hours with its monitors left running, which continue to project the sterile blues and desaturated tones most often associated with hospitals. Review by Matthew Turner

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Tyneside Cinema, 10 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6QG

Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Civil Rites

Film Still, Andrea Luka Zimmerman, Civil Rites

At its core, this is a film about the citizens of Newcastle and their indefatigable spirit of resistance, as it’s expressed itself over centuries. It takes us on a journey through a series of simply and beautifully composed shots of prosaic city spots that have also, at some historical moment, witnessed extraordinary acts of protest. Review by Helena Haimes

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Stuart Shave/Modern Art. 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

David Noonan: A Dark and Quiet Place

David Noonan, exhibition view, Modern Art, Vyner Street, London,

In the current political climate, few things seem more appealing that a quiet, dark room where one can shut out the world. Perhaps it is this escapist fantasy, then, that is the drive behind David Noonan’s new exhibition at Stuart Shave/Modern art entitled ‘A Dark and Quiet Place’. Review by Amy Jones

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

John Akomfrah: Purple

John Akomfrah: Purple. The Curve, Barbican

Throughout the five movements and epilogue of ‘Purple’, which follow a loose narrative arc beginning at birth and ending with death, and simultaneously show technological progressions from steam engines to artificial intelligence, the screens loop disparate imagery together creating a lyrical essayism. Review by Stan Portus

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Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Gogolevsky Blvd 10/2, Moscow, Russia

Image Diplomacy: Vladislav Shapovalov

Image Diplomacy

V-A-C Foundation presents Image Diplomacy, the fourth and final exhibition in the framework of the experimental programme Carte Blanche, in which the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA) invites art institutions to implement their own curatorial initiatives. Curated by V-A-C Foundation’s Anna Ilchenko, Image Diplomacy is the first solo exhibition for Milan based Russian artist Vladislav Shapovalov. The exhibition focuses on highlighting aspects of how the political vision of the mid-20th century was constructed also thanks to landmark exhibitions.

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Danielle Arnaud,123 Kennington Road London SE11 6SF

Louisa Fairclough: A Song Cycle for the Ruins of a Psychiatric Unit

Louisa Fairclough, A Rose, 2017.

Unnamed psychic catastrophe is a constant shadow in the work of Louisa Fairclough. Her third solo exhibition at Danielle Arnaud is close and claustrophobic: a shuttered room, a dead fireplace, where daylight plays weakly through small cracks. A web of cables litter the floor, threatening entanglement, disaster, the threshold of the machine. Review by Rowan Lear

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Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

Yoshinori Niwa: That Language Sounds Like a Language

Yoshinori Niwa, That Language Sounds Like a Language, installation view, Edel Assanti

For Yoshinori Niwa's second solo show at Edel Assanti, the Japanese artist presents a series of video works and installations that shine a light on the complex relationship between countries, between governments and their citizens, and between objects and the past. Review by Bobby Jewell

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