Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, Bow, London E3 5QZ

Thao Nguyen Phan: Becoming Alluvium

Becoming Alluvium, video still (2019)

Thao Nguyen Phan’s film ‘Becoming Alluvium’ (2019) is caught in the crosscurrents of serenity and ferocity, beauty and harsh reality. In this video work, Phan’s ongoing research surrounding the Mekong River is experienced through fictional narratives, woven together with themes of local folklore, ecological concern, South East Asian industrialisation and the fanning Mekong River itself. Alive and lively, this mineral-stained river is shot from the shoreline, from above and from the water, creating a poetic language that envelopes the audience, sweeping us away for the sixteen minutes of the film’s duration. Review by Nina Hanz

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Online, Big Screen Southend and Focal Point Gallery, Elmer Ave, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1NB

To Dream Effectively

Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley Resurrection Lands 2020 Digital video, 40 minutes 51 seconds; four console online game; banners; cctv; painted wall installation Courtesy the artist

Effective dreams are dreams that can change the world. ‘To Dream Effectively’ at Focal Point Gallery in Southend-on-Sea is a group show based upon the writing of Ursula K. Le Guin, bringing together alternative narratives for the future of our planet, both online, within the gallery, and upon Big Screen Southend. Review by Elliot Warren Gibbons

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Online

Plicnik Space Initiative

Plicnik Space Initiative

The Plicnik Space Initiative, a new artistic venture founded by Amelie Mckee and Melle Nieling, hosts its inaugural exhibition aboard the D02.2, a fictional spacecraft of massive proportions, with a mission to explore the boundary between physical and virtual space. As museums and galleries across the globe face uncertain futures in the wake of the pandemic, the show interrogates the parameters of digital curation, inviting imaginative responses to a range of pressing questions concerning art and the environment, technology, and commerce. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Online

Film London Jarman Award 2020

Black to Techno, Film made in collaboration with Frieze and GUCCI, shot on location in Detroit 2019

The six shortlisted works for the 2020 Film London Jarman Award are thought-provoking, exquisitely produced films that are markedly diverse and address concerns, in different documentary-style formats, that are at the forefront of social consciousness. They showcase the best in contemporary artists’ filmmaking and are being taken on a virtual tour to venues across the UK from 24 September to 19 November 2020. A prominent theme in the shortlist concerns archaeology, made manifest in the evaluation of the past or the uncovering of layers. Review by Rina Arya

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Forma Arts and Media, Peveril House, London, SE1 4TD

Interview with Alberta Whittle: ‘RESET’

Alberta Whittle RESET , 2020 Co - commissioned & co - produced by Frieze and Forma

Alberta Whittle’s new moving image work ‘RESET’ (2020) was awarded the 2020 Frieze Artist Award. Filmed across the artist’s native Barbados, as well as South Africa and the United Kingdom, it charts a polyphonic journey, woven together through contributions by writers, performers, and musicians, who Whittle refers to as her accomplices. ‘RESET’ is steeped in postcolonial and queer theory, informing Whittle’s process, which is also a form of protest: the work addresses contagion, xenophobia and their colonial entanglements, while exploring healing and meditation as forms of resistance. To reset, by Whittle’s terms, is not only to wipe the slate clean, but also to create a new de-colonial language: aural and written, embodied and spiritual, made up of multiple diasporic alliances. Interview by Inês Geraldes Cardoso

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Towner Eastbourne, Devonshire Park College Road Eastbourne BN21 4JJ

Towner International 2020

Towner International

A new biennial exhibition, with a £10,000 prize, features 24 artists selected from an open call by art world heavy weights: Polly Staple (Director of Collections, British Art, Tate), Turner Prize nominee Mike Nelson and Towner’s own Curator, Noelle Collins. There’s a lot of good things to be said about Towner International, Towner Gallery’s new biennial exhibition. It celebrates artists in the vicinity of Towner’s East Sussex location—10 have been chosen from Sussex, nearby Kent and Hampshire, 10 from elsewhere across the UK and 4 from international locations. Review by Kirsty White

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Jerwood Arts, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2020: Interview with Reman Sadani

Reman Sadani, Walkout 1, 2020. Commissioned for Jerwood/FVU Awards 2020: Hindsight. Supported by Jerwood Arts and Film and Video Umbrella. Photo: Anna Arca

As Reman Sadani's film 'Walkout 1' premieres at Jerwood Arts, Anneka French sat down with the artist, one of the winners of the Jerwood/FVU Awards 2020, to discuss her new work and the impact the award has had upon her practice. Interview by Anneka French

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Jerwood Arts, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2020: Interview with Guy Oliver

Guy Oliver, You Know Nothing of My Work, 2020. Commissioned for Jerwood/FVU Awards 2020: Hindsight. Supported by Jerwood Arts and Film and Video Umbrella. Photo: Anna Arca

Ahead of the presentation of his newly commissioned film, 'You Know Nothing of My Work', at Jerwood Arts this autumn, Anneka French sat down with artist Guy Oliver—one of the recipients of the Jerwood/FVU Awards 2020. Interview by Anneka French

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Bonington Gallery, Nottingham Trent University, Dryden St, Nottingham NG1 4GG

Sophie Cundale: The Near Room

Sophie Cundale, The Near Room, 2020 (film still). Installation view at Bonington Gallery. Photo: Jules Lister. Courtesy the artist and FVU

Sophie Cundale’s new film commission ‘The Near Room’ (2020) is an absurd psychological melodrama about loss and the aftermath. The film as a whole asks, but doesn’t answer the question of how we make sense of experiences in flux, like ecstasy or crisis. In unfathomable times, when death feels closer to life than ever, this film is an unsettling watch. Review by Andrew Price

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca: Swinguerra

Barbara Wagner and Benjamin de Burca. Film still of Swinguerra, 2019. 2 channel video installation 2K, colour, sound, 23 minutes. Courtesy the artists and Fortes D'Aloia and Gabriel, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro.

2019 saw Bárbara Wagner and Benjamin de Burca represent Brazil at the Venice Biennale with a new video titled ‘Swinguerra,’ in the Giardini della Biennale. And whilst it’s less than a year since Venice, the world that ‘Swinguerra’ originally inhabited seems like a lifetime ago. Its presentation in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios in Dublin comes amidst a global pandemic, blazing wildfires and a deepening culture war on both sides of the Atlantic. And whilst these topics have dominated the media 2020, they have been core issues in Brazil for a number of years with the continued deforestation of the Amazon and increasing violence against LGBTQ+ communities. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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MeetFactory, o. p. s., Ke Sklárně 3213/15, 150 00 Praha 5, Czech Republic

Spiritualities: Three Contemporary Portrayals of Transcendence and Beliefs

Jakub Jansa, It's so physical, 2020

Curated by Tereza Jindrová, the exhibition inaugurated a long-term programme line titled ‘Other Knowledge’. If one of the pillars of Western modernity is rationality and the division between nature and culture, the involved artists challenge both of these notions and propose to open up to a much wider array of epistemologies. Review by Jaroslava Tomanova

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Kiasma, Mannerheiminaukio 2, 00100 Helsinki, Finland

Liisa Lounila: Shadow Zone

7BPM

There’s a stillness in Liisa Lounila’s moving image works that inspires an urge to slow-down, to sit-down and to stay put, for a while. ‘Shadow Zone’, a collection of Lounila’s works from 2008 to 2020, challenges the viewer to observe the slight nuances in a seemingly repetitive world. Though spanning over a decade, the pieces selected remain relevant today; reflecting on broad themes such as the environment and consumerism, while providing a space in which to reinvigorate our relationship with the screen and digital media. Review by Selina Oakes

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover Street, London W1S 4NJ

Hito Steyerl and Harun Farocki: Life Captured Still

Harun Farocki Installation view, Harun Farocki & Hito Steyerl, Life Captured Still, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, London

For those who might ask why her work resonated so thoroughly with the generation just before her, the 'Life Captured Still' exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac may offer some answers. A selection of Hito Steyerl’s work was shown alongside a major influence on her life and work; the late filmmaker and video artist Harun Farocki. This exploration of the connections between these two prominent German filmmakers and visual artists was the first major posthumous exhibition of Harun Farocki’s work in the UK and, remarkably, the first exhibition to put their work in conversation together. Review by Chris Hayes

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Holt/Smithson Foundation (online)

Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson: Friday Film Programme

Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson shooting film at the site of Smithson's earthwork Broken Circle/Spiral Hill, Emmen, The Netherlands (1971)

Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson are two key figures in earth, land, and conceptual art, pioneering some of the most influential site-specific installations and video work in the 20th century. As many galleries and museums are continuing to find new digital means of presenting their programme, the Holt/Smithson Foundation launched a weekly film programme of both artists’ most iconic films alongside lesser known works with each available for just 24 hours. Throughout the series we see each artist in a new light, framed around the early experimental energy of video art as they explore artistic collaboration and themes of presence and absence against the backdrop of their monumental earthworks. Review by Aileen Dowling

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