Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Athens, Greece

Documenta 14: Athens

Rebecca Belmore, Biinjiya'iing Onji (From inside), 2017, marble, Filopappou Hill, Athens, documenta 14

Documenta 14: 'Learning from Athens' promised to address some of the current social and political issues facing Europe today by questioning its foundations: colonialism, patriarchy, gender-normativity and capitalism. Yet many feared that the exhibition tried to glamorise the ‘Greek crisis’ and capitalise on what is a very complex and difficult social and economic situation. What’s in it for Athens? Review by Anaïs Castro

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Fabrica, Duke St, Brighton BN1 1AG

Ipek Duben: THEY / ONLAR

Ipek Duben: THEY / ONLAR, installation view at Fabrica, 2017

‘Onlar,’ in English, means ‘they’ but artist Ipek Duben says the word translates more accurately to ‘everyone who is not like us.’ In her multi-screen video installation ‘They/Onlar’, Duben presents the experiences of Turkey’s ‘others’: Kurds, Alevis, Armenians, Jews, Rum and Romanis as well as LGBT and covered women. Review by Ashley Janke

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Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, Treitlstraße 2, 1040 Vienna, Austria

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses, installation view at Kunsthalle Wien, 2017.

Before entering Camille Henrot’s solo exhibition ‘If Wishes Were Horses,’ the viewer is required to remove their shoes. While this serves the practical function of not damaging the floor, it is also an intimate gesture with associations of religious worship, the comfort of being at home, privacy, or even sensuality. Review by Deborah Krieger

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZx

Maeve Brennan: The Drift

Maeve Brennan, The Drift, 2017. Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2017.

From the very first images you are transported into rural Lebanon. The silence of the valley is broken by an incoming car, driving past a junction littered with disused motor vehicles. These modern ruins are instantly followed by ancient villas and temples that have sat for centuries in the countryside, now surrounded by roads, pylons and infrastructure. Review by Bobby Jewell

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham, B1 2HS

Oliver Beer

Oliver Beer, installation view at Ikon, 2017

Beer’s practice is diverse – encompassing film, sound, and sculpture – and perhaps more easily related by sensibility than subject matter. His home video, ‘Mum’s Continuous Note’, which welcomes us into the exhibition, serves as our induction. Review by Kit Webb

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Furtherfield Gallery, The McKenzie Pavilion, Harringay, London N4 2NQ

PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.

Refugee Flag, Installation view at Furtherfield Gallery, 2017

‘PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.’ announces itself with a song and a flag. Yara Said’s ‘Refugee Nation’ flag, designed in lifejacket orange for stateless participants of the 2016 Olympics, floats over the small pavilion in Finsbury Park housing Furtherfield Gallery. Review by David Morris

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CCA Glasgow, 350 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3JD

The Sky is Falling

Laura oldfield ford, radiant futures, sound and mixed media, 2017.

The Sky is Falling is concerned with city spaces as the site for utopias, dreams and social visions. Meanwhile, it documents the abrasive and contradictory experiences of citizens as the potential that urban utopias offer declines and fails. Review by Alexander Hetherington

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Castor, Enclave 8, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Jack West: Time and Attendance

Jack West: Time and Attendance, Castor

The videos exist in a digital purgatory with nothing around them apart from pixels and hyperbolic colour palettes emulating materials we know. Review by William Davie

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Harris Museum and Art Gallery, Market Street, Preston PR1 2PP

Maeve Rendle: I Remember All

I Remember All, a spectacular new film and performance work by Maeve Rendle, was inspired by Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull. Text by Amy Botfield

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man, installation view at The Power Plant, Toronto, 2017

In his solo exhibition at the Power Plant, Jonathas de Andrade astutely mines the racialized socio-economic conditions specific to north-eastern Brazil in order to explore the ways in which archetypes, ideologies and fictions both conceal and construct lived experience. Review by Alex Borkowski

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

A World View: John Latham

A World View, John Latham, Speak, 1962, Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London, 1 March 2017 - 21 May 2017

Neither chronological nor particularly thematic, the show’s organisation drives home one of the main characteristics of Latham’s work: to a greater or lesser extent all of it reflects his peculiar and esoteric theories of universal time, and his theory of art as event. Review by Anya Smirnova

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