Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1F 9DY

Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

Installation View of Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

‘Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium’ presents an extensive exhibition by the late American artist and writer Allan Sekula (1951-2013). While the title aims to highlight the medium’s aporias, the show extends across photography, performance, text, and video, contrasting photography’s material mediations with its claim to realism. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Geta Brătescu: The Power of the Line

Geta Brătescu, Jocul formelor (Game of Forms), 2010, Collage, drawing on paper, 4 parts, 45 x 60 cm

Hauser & Wirth, working closely with the artist before her death and with Ivan Gallery, has put together a museum-quality exhibition of this remarkable artist’s work. The show draws together pieces from the last decade, a period in which Brătescu’s practice focused on working with the line as a structuring principle. Review by Anna Souter

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham, NG1 2GB

Elizabeth Price: FELT TIP

Elizabeth Price, KOHL (still), 2018

Elizabeth Price’s solo show at Nottingham Contemporary brings together three new works. Each departs from a moment in late 20th century British history: a period marked by the collapse of the organized Left, the systematic dismantling of union power, and the programmatic reconstitution of the working class. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 4PY

FOCUS: Agnes Martin

FOCUS: Agnes Martin. Installation view, Levy Gorvy, London, 2019.

This is an artist who spent her life in the pursuit of abstract painting: grids and stripes, minimal yet expressive abstractions, imperfect horizontal lines in soft, pastel shades and faint, pencil-drawn grids. A similarly meditative, light-bathed atmosphere pervades the film, and it is a revelation to see Martin’s artistic vision realised in the bread-and-butter reality of the physical landscape. Review by Clare Robson

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone: Webb-Ellis, Richard Whitby

The Lost Ones by Richard Whitby as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone exhibition at Jerwood Space

‘Going, Gone’ is the latest installment of the Jerwood/FVU Awards, and brings us two newly-commissioned films by winning artists Richard Whitby and Webb-Ellis. This year’s work ‘takes Britain’s declared exit from the European Union as a starting point for reflection on other collective experiences of transition and loss. Review by Jack Head

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NS

Rose English: Form, Feminisms, Femininities

Rose English, Plato's Chair, Vancouver, 1983, Gelatin silver print, 69 x 69 cm

Two lovers lie in bed sleeping. Their duvet is a ploughed field, fabric folds replaced with the undulating peaks and troughs of soil furrows. An air of the uncanny pervades ‘Bed in Field’ (1971), a series of photographs of British performance artist Rose English and her partner of the time tucked into a pastoral landscape. Review by Lotte Johnson

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Beatrice Gibson: Crone Music

Beatrice Gibson, Deux Soeurs Qui Ne Sont Pas Soeurs (Two Sisters who Are Not Sisters) Crone Music, Installation View, Camden Arts Centre 2019

Slightly obscured by a mass of literary and cinematic citations Beatrice Gibson’s ‘Crone Music’ contains a powerful narration of maternal fantasies and a study of the anxieties of millennial parenthood. Review by Piers Masterson

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Ghislaine Leung: CONSTITUTION

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery evades concise summation. Description becomes easily lost in particularities, or overlooks specific works altogether. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd: Joins

Joins, Installation View, 2019, Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd

At the end of a long outdoor corridor filled with palms and tropical plants is Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd’s exhibition ‘Joins’ at Cell Project Space in East London. Bringing together a series of recent works, in addition to two spatial interventions in the gallery, the show explores the infrastructures that produce contemporary domestic space. Review by Bernard Hay

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arebyte Gallery, 7 Botanic Square, Leamouth Peninsula, London E14 0LG

RE-FIGURE-GROUND

Amina Ross, by your hands I open spill out. I'm the inside of an egg I pour we bloom magma rushing from a jagged crown of earth molten and dangerous and alive can't you feel (2018)

‘RE-FIGURE-GROUND’ asks us to re-examine our current positions and proposes alternative futures that go beyond the boundaries of race, gender and sex. Review by Julia Schouten

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Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

Raqs Media Collective, Not Yet At Ease, 2018. Modular padded structure with fabric ceiling, padded stools. Six videos displayed on four monitors and two projections, six channel audio. Dimensions variable.

‘Spinal’, Raqs Media Collective's exhibition at Frith Street Gallery, features the installation ‘Not Yet At Ease’. It reflects on the mental state created by the discomfort and exploitation of First World War soldiers of Asian heritage. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

We are the people. Who are you?

Funda Gul Ozcan, It Happened as Expected, 2018, Four channel video installation, looping, Dimensions variable

A timely exhibition, ‘We are the people. Who are you?’ is an insightful essay representing current anxieties over the health of our electoral democracy. The 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall is looming and as well as reflecting the unpredictable consequences of that historical moment for artists from the former Soviet bloc the show connects the ‘revolution’ of 1989 with the turning point of 2016’s US election and other historical pivots. Review by Piers Masterson

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25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Cécile B. Evans: AMOS’ WORLD

Cecile B. Evans, AMOS' WORLD, Tramway (2019).

‘AMOS’ WORLD’ is a highly staged, three-part, telepathic and narcissistic TV soap opera, strewn with the vernacular of a therapy session and the persuasive mantras of the executive suite, the property developer and the city planner. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Cooper Gallery, 13 Perth Rd, Dundee DD1 4HT

Phil Collins: Ceremony

Phil Collins, Ceremony, 2018. Installation view Cooper Gallery, Dundee, 2019.

Visual artist and filmmaker Phil Collins’ journalistic video essay ‘Ceremony’ (2018) is structured as a complex melding of transnational road movie, rumination on the (in)visibility of public monuments, archival political portrait and ideological time/image/ machine. Review by Alex Hetherington

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