Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Tyneside Cinema, 10 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6QG

Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Civil Rites

Film Still, Andrea Luka Zimmerman, Civil Rites

At its core, this is a film about the citizens of Newcastle and their indefatigable spirit of resistance, as it’s expressed itself over centuries. It takes us on a journey through a series of simply and beautifully composed shots of prosaic city spots that have also, at some historical moment, witnessed extraordinary acts of protest. Review by Helena Haimes

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Stuart Shave/Modern Art. 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

David Noonan: A Dark and Quiet Place

David Noonan, exhibition view, Modern Art, Vyner Street, London,

In the current political climate, few things seem more appealing that a quiet, dark room where one can shut out the world. Perhaps it is this escapist fantasy, then, that is the drive behind David Noonan’s new exhibition at Stuart Shave/Modern art entitled ‘A Dark and Quiet Place’. Review by Amy Jones

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

John Akomfrah: Purple

John Akomfrah: Purple. The Curve, Barbican

Throughout the five movements and epilogue of ‘Purple’, which follow a loose narrative arc beginning at birth and ending with death, and simultaneously show technological progressions from steam engines to artificial intelligence, the screens loop disparate imagery together creating a lyrical essayism. Review by Stan Portus

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Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Gogolevsky Blvd 10/2, Moscow, Russia

Image Diplomacy: Vladislav Shapovalov

Image Diplomacy

V-A-C Foundation presents Image Diplomacy, the fourth and final exhibition in the framework of the experimental programme Carte Blanche, in which the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA) invites art institutions to implement their own curatorial initiatives. Curated by V-A-C Foundation’s Anna Ilchenko, Image Diplomacy is the first solo exhibition for Milan based Russian artist Vladislav Shapovalov. The exhibition focuses on highlighting aspects of how the political vision of the mid-20th century was constructed also thanks to landmark exhibitions.

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Danielle Arnaud,123 Kennington Road London SE11 6SF

Louisa Fairclough: A Song Cycle for the Ruins of a Psychiatric Unit

Louisa Fairclough, A Rose, 2017.

Unnamed psychic catastrophe is a constant shadow in the work of Louisa Fairclough. Her third solo exhibition at Danielle Arnaud is close and claustrophobic: a shuttered room, a dead fireplace, where daylight plays weakly through small cracks. A web of cables litter the floor, threatening entanglement, disaster, the threshold of the machine. Review by Rowan Lear

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Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

Yoshinori Niwa: That Language Sounds Like a Language

Yoshinori Niwa, That Language Sounds Like a Language, installation view, Edel Assanti

For Yoshinori Niwa's second solo show at Edel Assanti, the Japanese artist presents a series of video works and installations that shine a light on the complex relationship between countries, between governments and their citizens, and between objects and the past. Review by Bobby Jewell

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Beth Kettel

Beth Kettel, The Mist of a Pessimist, 2017. Live performance as part of Zabludowicz Collection Invites solo exhibition.

It’s a game show but unlike any you’ve ever seen. Three contestants file wordlessly onto the small stage— animal, human and machine. Familiar and strange, they face the audience. The animal wears a mask, detailed enough to identify it but vague enough to remain unspecific. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Jemma Egan: Turning to Dust

Turning to Dust, 2017, Jemma Egan. Installation View

For this outing Jemma Egan displays five works unpacking the narrative of a wellness industry which is fast bedding down as a canonical part of our postmodern obsession with the self. Review by Sophie Risner

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Calvert 22, 22 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP

Dmitri Prigov: Theatre of Revolutionary Action

Dimitri Prigov. Theatre of Revolutionary Action, Installation view, 2017.

‘Russia,’ a 2004 media-opera, like much of Prigov’s work that spans drawing, installation, performance, poetry and sculpture tests the limits of language and meaning, while exploring the complex legacy of Russia’s socialist project and its eventual unravelling. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

3-Phase

Nicola Singh, Sweet Spot, 2017 – installation view. Commissioned for 3-Phase, a partnership between Jerwood Charitable Foundation, WORKPLACE and Eastside Projects.

For this second edition of '3-Phase', artists Larry Achiampong, Mark Essen and Nicola Singh have been selected by an independent panel to develop and present new works through three exhibition moments. Following the first at Jerwood Space, the artists will exhibit at WORKPLACE Gallery in Gateshead and Eastside Projects in Birmingham in 2018. Review by Giulia Ponzano

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DenFrie, Oslo Pl. 1, 2100 København Ø, Denmark

Hans Op de Beeck: Staging Silence II

Staging Silence II, video still

The subject matter of Staging Silence II, a video work by internationally acclaimed Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck, consists of miniature dioramas depicting deserted scenarios that are built by anonymous hands, working with meticulous precision. There is no plot, no storyline, only empty scenes, where something might happen.

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Torbjørn Rødland: The Touch That Made You

Torbjørn Rødland, Bathroom Tiles, 2011-13

In Torbjørn Rødland’s photography activity is stalled. Chemistry is cauterised and left to breathe and rest, surfaces and nubile skins are luminous and lustful, viscosities slip and collaborate. Review by Alex Bennett

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Plymouth Arts Centre, Peninsula Arts, KARST, Plymouth College of Art, The Council House, Plymouth

We The People Are The Work

More Than A Pony Show, Matt Stokes.

A partnership between Plymouth’s major visual arts venues, 'We The People Are The Work' is comprised of five new commissions installed across the city. With each involving varying degrees of collaboration with the city’s inhabitants, at the core of the work is how each artist navigates the complexities of ‘social engagement’. Review by Rowan Lear

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Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

Emotion + the Tech(no)body

Emotion + The Tech(no)body, Ulla Rauter

Hosted at the Austrian Cultural Forum, the exhibition brings together works which evoke and unveil emotions dealing with technology as a subject or a tool. The show challenges our cultural attachment to data and the relationship of our bodies to technology, offering points of view on artistic practices that on the one hand bring these notions together, and on the other convey the tension within them. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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