Viewing articles tagged with 'Nottingham'

Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Denzil Forrester: Itchin & Scratchin

Denzil Forrester: Itchin & Scratchin, 2020. Installation view of Nottingham Contemporary.

Spanning the whole of Denzil Forrester’s career from ‘The Cave’ (1978) painted before the artist went to the Royal College of Art, up to works made in 2019 during a first trip to Jamaica, the movement and dynamism of Afro-Caribbean Dub-Reggae scenes with depictions of club nights, sound systems, house parties and Carnival remain the major subject of the work. Review by Piers Masterson

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Blvd, Nottingham NG7 6BE

Shezad Dawood: Encroachments

Shezad Dawood, Encroachments. Installation view, New Art Exchange, 2020

Shezad Dawood’s exhibition is overrun with multi-coloured terrazzo. The walls are plastered with garish speckles, which seep into paintings, prints, plinths and even the exhibition guide. The terrazzo, designed by Dawood, gives the display a Pop-y veneer, strengthened by visual allusions to Robert Rauschenberg’s collages and Andy Warhol’s silkscreens, as well as tributes to the arcade game, Space Invaders. Review by Julia Schouten

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham NG7 6BE

John Akomfrah: Mimesis: African Soldier

The Journey, Mimesis: African Soldier

The opening titles to John Akomfrah’s ‘Mimesis: African Soldier’ (2018) state that “six million colonial subjects fought and served in the Great War” and that three-hundred and fifty-thousand died in Europe. Akomfrah’s three-screen installation interweaves archival footage with new material that commemorates those conscripted into the First World War by colonial powers, to fight for a cause not their own. Review by Joshua Lockwood-Moran

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Lis Rhodes: Dissident Lines

Light Music

“Write the first lines last”, says Lis Rhodes in a voiceover. “Ambiguous journeys have many beginnings”. In her films, which are socially diagnostic as much as they are aesthetically rich, Rhodes recognises one of the most important linguistic truths of our time. Hypocrisy is an echo, the same thing twice in two ways. Review by Adam Heardman

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham, NG1 2GB

Elizabeth Price: FELT TIP

Elizabeth Price, KOHL (still), 2018

Elizabeth Price’s solo show at Nottingham Contemporary brings together three new works. Each departs from a moment in late 20th century British history: a period marked by the collapse of the organized Left, the systematic dismantling of union power, and the programmatic reconstitution of the working class. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Primary, 33 Seely Road Nottingham, NG7 1NU & New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham NG7 6BE

Hardeep Pandhal: Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME

Hardeep Pandhal, Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME (2019), Primary

Nottingham galleries, New Art Exchange and Primary present ‘Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME’, a split-site exhibition of recent and ongoing works by Hardeep Pandhal. A second generation British Sikh now based in Glasgow, Pandhal dissects continuing projects of cultural assimilation and the performance of heritage. Review by Amelia Seren Roberts

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance

Installation view of Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Oct 2018 - Jan 2019, Nottingham Contemporary.

‘Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance’ is the first act of an exhibition showing a kind of history of resistance through the means of feminisms and intersectional queer thinking. The curators started to build the exhibition as an idea two years ago. Then, we didn’t have #metoo and #timesup, Trump wasn’t yet the POTUS, women’s marches weren’t so much in the news ... Review by Gulnaz Can

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories from Across the Arab World

Joe Namy, Red Filled the Intervals; Between the Musical Notes, 2017/2017. Courtesy of the artist. Installation shot, From Ear to Ear to Eye, Nottingham Contemporary, Dec 2017- Mar 2018. Photo Stuart Whipps.

‘From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories From Across the Arab World’ at Nottingham Contemporary explores sound, music and listening in the Arab world, revealing different layers of meaning, intertwined histories, complicated political situations and complex questions. This expansive exhibition spreads across six rooms and showcases works by almost 20 artists who work with sound, are musicians or explore oral stories. Review by Roma Piotrowska

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Bonington Building, Nottingham Trent University, Dryden St, Nottingham NG1 4GG, UK

Sara MacKillop: One Room Living

One Room Living, installation view

One Room Living presents a series of works and interactions that reference the wide variety of spatial uses that directly surround Bonington Gallery – analysing not only the gallery’s site and situation, but also how the wider institution’s function is represented across a multitude of spaces.

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

States of America

Lee Friedlander, Mt Rushmore, South Dakota, 1969, gelatin-silver print.

Nottingham Contemporary’s ‘States of America’ sweeps across the shifting social and political landscape of the USA between the 1960s and early 1990s, capturing the rise of popular culture and suburbia, declining city centres, the Civil Rights Movement, wealth disparity, urban life and the fading American Dream. Viewed through the lens of seventeen different photographers, we are offered a necessarily prismatic picture of American culture that is particularly compelling given current events. Review by Hannah Newell

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Bonington Gallery, Nottingham Trent University, Bonington building, Dryden Street, Nottingham, UK, NG1 4GG

It’s Our Playground: Artificial Sensibility

Installation view

A solo exhibition of new work by Paris-based artist duo It’s Our Playground (IOP), comprised of Camille Le Houezec and Jocelyn Villemont. Artificial Sensibility continues the duo’s ongoing reflection on artificial intelligence – when technology mimics human cognitive behaviour. Artificial Sensibility reveals a hybrid learning process of automated principles of recognition and basic human methods of education.

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham, NG7 6BE

UNTITLED: art on the conditions of our time

UNTITLED: art on the conditions of our time, installation view at New Art Exchange, 2017

UNTITLED provides a number of guilty pleasures. Opening with Harold Offeh's video Covers Playlist (2016), in which a slightly over the hill man works on his disco diva moves, the show manages to maintain that identity politics can be playful as well as a serious subject. Review by Piers Masterson

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Primary, 33 Seely Rd, Nottingham NG7 1NU

Anna K.E.: Leaving the Rock Stage

Leaving the Rock Stage (2016)

Pivotal to the exhibition, through physical dominance and content, are photographs supported by stage trussing. These are structures that would, as the exhibition title suggests, be at home within the context of large stadium gig. Review by Alice Gale-Feeny

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham, NG1 2GB

Marguerite Humeau: FOXP2

Marguerite Humeau, FOXP2, 2016. Exhibition view, Nottingham Contemporary. Courtesy the artist, C L E A R I N G New York/Brussels, DUVE Berlin.

The galleries of Nottingham Contemporary are taken over by the relentless echoes of human civilization and the emotional turmoil of elephants - now the dominant species on Earth. Marguerite Humeau’s exhibition, ‘FOXP2’, comprises two immersive installations that exist in the blurred space where science ends and fiction begins. Review by Laura-Jade Vaughan.

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