Viewing articles tagged with 'Group'

Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford, England

America’s Cool Modernism

Le Tournesol (The Sunflower)

Above all, in America’s Cool Modernism at the Ashmolean Museum, the absence of human presence in the artworks betrays an anxiety towards the place of people in an increasingly mechanised world. I found myself thinking about the photographs of Detroit that surfaced several years ago, showing the derelict buildings and factories that remain in the wake of the city’s bankruptcy. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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The Koppel Prpject Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Natur Blick

Installation view, Natur Blick, The Koppel Project

In ‘Natur Blick’, scanning - the instinctive visual movement of the human eye, a gesture co-opted by modern technology - is the subject of the work of ten contemporary artists. Review by Olivia Aherne

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Castlefield Gallery, 2 Hewitt Street Manchester, M15 4GB

Ruth Barker & Hannah Leighton-Boyce

Ruth Barker, Victory, 2013, Her whole self, 2018

Set against the backdrop of the centenary celebrations of the suffragette movement, Castlefield Gallery's exhibition – which is co-commissioned with the University of Salford Art Collection – is the result of Ruth Barker and Hannah Leighton-Boyce's year-long research and production residencies. Throughout 2017, the two artists exchanged ideas from their respective locations in Salford and Glasgow; each delving into the long-standing archives of either the University of Salford Art Collection or the Glasgow Women's Library in order to formulate new visual narratives. Review by Selina Oakes

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Met Breuer, 945 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now)

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) at the Met Breuer, 2018

Like Life, current on view at the Met Breuer, is a sweeping paean to historical contemporaneity, but where crowded chaos or a pandering sense of prurience could easily reign, co-curators Sheena Wagstaff and Luke Syson manage to imbue the eerie magic of mimesis with an academic bent that won’t intimidate fair-weather tourists. Review by Torey Akers

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Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 140 George St, The Rocks NSW 2000, Australia

21st Biennale of Sydney: SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

21st Biennale of Sydney, SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement installation view

Artistic Director Mami Kataoka utilizes the concept of Superposition as a metaphor for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Superposition is a theory borrowed from quantum mechanics, it posits that different, even seemingly conflicting, components are held in suspension - equal in their difference and vital to the whole. This metaphor seeks to bring the different threads, directions, contradictions and loose-ends that exist in our contemporary world into a (utopian) balance. Review by Kathleen Linn

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KARST Gallery, 22 George Pl, Plymouth PL1 3NY

Assembled Spaces

Assembled Spaces at KARST Gallery, 2018 installation view

Assembled Spaces brings together the work of Tine Bay Lührssen, Nina Brauhauser and Ilka Helmig in their UK debut. The artist trio combine photography, sculpture and traditional and digital drawing with a considered harmony in the arrangement of the works. They zigzag between each other, creating a visual conversation which dictates no linear instructions, nor a start or end point, to the viewer’s navigation. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Actions. The image of the world can be different

Installation view, Rana Begum

Kettle's Yard in Cambridge re-opens following a multi-million pound redevelopment of its galleries and public spaces and takes this question, and its possible answers, as a starting point. It features the work of 38 practitioners whose works fill the galleries, the on-site historic house and a nearby church, as well as occupying space online and being emblazoned on the uniform of the front of house staff. This exhibition is expansive. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W 17th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

A Lost Future

A Lost Future, 2018 installation view

Currently at the Rubin Museum, New York, is A Lost Future, a yearlong exhibition on view through January 28th, 2019, showcasing explorations of the future, a theme that in this context is applied specifically to Bengal and South Asia by Shezad Dawood, Matti Braun, and the Otolith. Review by Louis Soulard

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Wysing Arts Centre, Fox Rd, Cambridge CB23 2TX

more of an avalanche

Wysing Arts Centre, more of an avalanche, installation view, 2018

The exhibition takes the most ubiquitously right wing of pejorative terms – “snowflake” – as its conceptual springboard: the works here reclaim this insult from the political right by embracing and unabashedly exploring it. Empathy for your fellow humans and a willingness to speak up against pernicious injustice are embraced as strengths to celebrate, rather than mocked as signs of hypersensitivity and an inability to cope with ‘real life’. Review by Helena Haimes

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Imperial War Museum London, Lambeth Rd, London SE1 6HZ

Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11

Surveillance Camera with Plinth

The compulsion of artists to respond to certain events as they unfold, as exemplified by artists in Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11 at the Imperial War Museum, London, raises unavoidable questions concerning the relationship between aesthetics and morality. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NS

Women Look at Women

Installation view, Women Look At Women, Richard Saltoun Gallery, London 15 February - 31 March 2018

The show opens with Renate Bertlmann’s ‘Transformations’ (1969/2013), a series of 53 black and white photographs which address an analysis of gender-specific social roles through the role-play sequence of staged photography. Indeed, the importance of inventing alter-egos in performance seems significant throughout the exhibition. Review by Matthew Cheale

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage

Photo caption - Installation view, 2018 Triennial: “Songs for Sabotage”

While each painting on view in the 2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage, at the New Museum, New York, might pack a punch on its own, when grouped, this pervasive, globalized homogeneity only undercuts the swollen pomp ascribed to Songs of Sabotage by its organizers, and points, perhaps, to a more sinister condescension afoot in the galleries themselves. Review by Torey Akers

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

No, No, No, No

No, No, No, No Installation View, 2018

Through the use of verbal and visual puns, the works displayed in ‘No, No, No, No’ convey irony and humour, and challenge the audience by playing with ideas of authorship, making and presenting art, and even appropriating existing artworks. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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