Viewing articles tagged with 'Group'

National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire, and Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire

The Course of Empire: The Savage State

Looking at some of Cole’s earliest American landscape paintings, made after his move to New York from Philadelphia in 1825, the contrast is arresting. The Edenic quality of his scenery is hard to miss. There’s a quiet stillness to paintings like ‘View of the Round-Top in the Catskill Mountains’ (1827), in which the landscapes seem both fresh and undisturbed; not only are they new to Cole – and “new to Art”, as he writes in his journal – but they seem somehow newly created, as if the painting’s mists were rising from a just-finished topography. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

LOW BATT. installation view

LOW BATT. installation view

The exhibition’s text opens with a quote from the film Dawn of the Dead, where a group of survivors find refuge from the zombie apocalypse in a shopping mall. The exhibition seeks to problematize our reliance on technology and looks for alternative forms of survival, asking ‘What tools might expedite shopping mall survivalism?’ For Turf projects, who are being evicted from this space at the Whitgift at the end of the year to make way for a shiny new Westfield, the question of survival has never been more urgent. Review by Amy Jones

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Hayward Gallery, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, London SE1 8XX

Adapt to Survive: Notes from the Future

Adapt to Survive: Notes from the Future

Adapt to Survive: Notes from the Future is a title that would be as at home on a book by Ayn Rand as the group exhibition currently at the Hayward Gallery. Brought together by Senior Curator Dr. Cliff Lauson, the show contains seven works which each explore potential trajectories from the present. If there is a guiding thread, it is less in the fullness of its visions, than the way it challenges an inability to create alternative futures.

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The Tetley, Hunslet Rd, Leeds LS10 1JQ

Material Environments

Material Environments installation view

Inspired by Yorkshire’s cult status as a UFO hotspot, Serena Korda has created a new immersive and raw sound work, ‘Clairaudience’ (2018). Korda’s research process is mapped across three galleries. Review by Jack Welsh

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Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Abandoibarra Etorb., 2, 48009 Bilbo, Bizkaia, Spain

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World installation view, 2018

What becomes apparent in the latter stages of the exhibition is a sense that many of the exhibition’s themes collapse into one another. 2008 is painted as a pivotal moment where the Beijing Olympics act as an affirmation of China’s ascent to global power, yet the Sichuan earthquake happened only a month before. Review by Stanley Portus

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Gallery Oldham, Oldham Cultural Quarter, Greaves St, Oldham OL1 1AL

Natural:History (a fable of progress)

Natural:History (a fable of progress) Or, 'oh no, we've killed the last unicorn'

On 20 March 2018, the last male White Northern Rhino (who lived in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, under the watch of armed guards to protect him from illegal poachers) was put down. The media reported the event extensively, as you might expect. But what about the other 3 to 136 less ‘glamorous’ species that quietly slip into extinction every day without mention? Review by Sara Jaspan

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Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford, England

America’s Cool Modernism

Le Tournesol (The Sunflower)

Above all, in America’s Cool Modernism at the Ashmolean Museum, the absence of human presence in the artworks betrays an anxiety towards the place of people in an increasingly mechanised world. I found myself thinking about the photographs of Detroit that surfaced several years ago, showing the derelict buildings and factories that remain in the wake of the city’s bankruptcy. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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The Koppel Prpject Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Natur Blick

Installation view, Natur Blick, The Koppel Project

In ‘Natur Blick’, scanning - the instinctive visual movement of the human eye, a gesture co-opted by modern technology - is the subject of the work of ten contemporary artists. Review by Olivia Aherne

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Castlefield Gallery, 2 Hewitt Street Manchester, M15 4GB

Ruth Barker & Hannah Leighton-Boyce

Ruth Barker, Victory, 2013, Her whole self, 2018

Set against the backdrop of the centenary celebrations of the suffragette movement, Castlefield Gallery's exhibition – which is co-commissioned with the University of Salford Art Collection – is the result of Ruth Barker and Hannah Leighton-Boyce's year-long research and production residencies. Throughout 2017, the two artists exchanged ideas from their respective locations in Salford and Glasgow; each delving into the long-standing archives of either the University of Salford Art Collection or the Glasgow Women's Library in order to formulate new visual narratives. Review by Selina Oakes

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Met Breuer, 945 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now)

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) at the Met Breuer, 2018

Like Life, current on view at the Met Breuer, is a sweeping paean to historical contemporaneity, but where crowded chaos or a pandering sense of prurience could easily reign, co-curators Sheena Wagstaff and Luke Syson manage to imbue the eerie magic of mimesis with an academic bent that won’t intimidate fair-weather tourists. Review by Torey Akers

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Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 140 George St, The Rocks NSW 2000, Australia

21st Biennale of Sydney: SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

21st Biennale of Sydney, SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement installation view

Artistic Director Mami Kataoka utilizes the concept of Superposition as a metaphor for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Superposition is a theory borrowed from quantum mechanics, it posits that different, even seemingly conflicting, components are held in suspension - equal in their difference and vital to the whole. This metaphor seeks to bring the different threads, directions, contradictions and loose-ends that exist in our contemporary world into a (utopian) balance. Review by Kathleen Linn

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KARST Gallery, 22 George Pl, Plymouth PL1 3NY

Assembled Spaces

Assembled Spaces at KARST Gallery, 2018 installation view

Assembled Spaces brings together the work of Tine Bay Lührssen, Nina Brauhauser and Ilka Helmig in their UK debut. The artist trio combine photography, sculpture and traditional and digital drawing with a considered harmony in the arrangement of the works. They zigzag between each other, creating a visual conversation which dictates no linear instructions, nor a start or end point, to the viewer’s navigation. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Actions. The image of the world can be different

Installation view, Rana Begum

Kettle's Yard in Cambridge re-opens following a multi-million pound redevelopment of its galleries and public spaces and takes this question, and its possible answers, as a starting point. It features the work of 38 practitioners whose works fill the galleries, the on-site historic house and a nearby church, as well as occupying space online and being emblazoned on the uniform of the front of house staff. This exhibition is expansive. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W 17th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

A Lost Future

A Lost Future, 2018 installation view

Currently at the Rubin Museum, New York, is A Lost Future, a yearlong exhibition on view through January 28th, 2019, showcasing explorations of the future, a theme that in this context is applied specifically to Bengal and South Asia by Shezad Dawood, Matti Braun, and the Otolith. Review by Louis Soulard

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