Viewing articles tagged with 'Group'

Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Makers Open

Mark Corfield-Moore, Celestial Meteors, 2019 (left); Nitrous Flame, 2019 (middle) and Golden Showers, 2019 (right). Dyed Warp, handwoven cotton in oak frame.

The work in this year’s Jerwood Makers Open is undoubtedly beautiful and desirable. But it also resists quick consumption. Investigations into traditional craft processes, social anxieties and climate change all appear in this meditation on making. Review by Bernard Hay

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Fondazione Prada, Largo Isarco, 2, 20139 Milano MI, Italy

Lizzie Fitch | Ryan Trecartin: Whether Line

Exhibition view of Lizzie Fitch | Ryan Trecartin: Whether Line, Fondazione Prada, 2019

Lizzie Fitch and Ryan Trecartin’s new commission at Fondazione Prada is a trip in hyper-reality through means of immersive installations and role-play video performances. The multimedia exhibition unfolds as a journey into different physical and psychosocial spaces - from Milan to the core of contemporary (American) culture, via Ohio’s countryside. Review by Giulia Civardi

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Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, 42-44 Pollard Row, London E2 6NB

Ian Giles: Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag

Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag, presented by Gasworks and videoclub

Before occupying their own spaces, queer communities would gather at ‘gay nights’ in establishments where drinks prices were raised for punters with no alternative. Subverting previous migratory notions, Ian Giles presented ‘Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag’ at the queer-run Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club. The event featured a screening of his new film by the same name, alongside video works by five other artists that discuss the past, present and future of queer spaces. Review by Ryan Kearney

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

staring forms: Miranda Blennerhassett, Aleana Egan, Andreas Kindler von Knobloch, Tanad Williams

staring forms, installation image, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Mid-way through ‘A Game of Chess’, the second section of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem ‘The Waste Land’, come the words that have lent themselves to the title of ‘staring forms’, a new group exhibition in Dublin’s Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. In these lines Eliot references the ancient (and violent) Greek myth of King Tereus and the sisters Philomela and Procne, all three of whom were turned into birds by the gods. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Heidi Schwegler and Quayola: Plane of Scattered Pasts

Athazagoraphobia

In ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ at Upfor Gallery in Portland, Oregon, artists Heidi Schwegler and Quayola explore object histories and the fragmentation process with sculptural works and video. Schwegler amends, recasts, and highlights aged objects to reframe their value. Quayola’s video piece ‘Strata #1’ (2008) invigorates the exhibition with immersive sound and vivid colour. While the show focuses on the fragmented form, ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ is conceptually complete. Review by Lindsay Costello

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MK Gallery, 900 Midsummer Blvd, Milton Keynes MK9 3QA

The Lie of the Land

The Crowning

Milton Keynes is quite unlike any other place in the UK. A new, modernist town built in the 1960s to provide somewhere to live for people who worked in London. A town built out of concrete, marble and glass. A town built on a grid. A few decades later the place became known as a haven for various subcultures; ravers, skateboarders and boy racers all flocked to the town, youthful rebellion disrupting the grid. Review by Ryan Hughes

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VITRINE, Basel, Vogesenpl. 15, 4056 Basel, Switzerland

If it’s not meant to last, then it’s Performance: A Q&A with Alys Williams

If it's not meant to last, this it's Performance, 2019. Installation view. VITRINE, Basel.

VITRINE, Basel’s current group exhibition explores how transient artworks are challenging the existing systems of value surrounding art. ‘If it’s not meant to last, then it’s Performance’ brings together work by Tim Etchells, Paul Hage Boutros, Sophie Jung, Clare Kenny, Hannah Lees, Wil Murray, and Rafal Zajko. Alys Williams, the curator, talks about how the exhibition came to be and the ways in which performance is reshaping the art market. Interview by Susie Pentelow

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, Shadwell, London E1 7QX

Is This Tomorrow?

Jacolby Satterwhite and Andrés \Jaque / Office for Political Innovation, 2019, Spirits Roaming the Earth

'Is This Tomorrow?’ has invited architects and artists to work together to create a series of installations on the future, many of whom are working together for the first time. But whereas the 1956 exhibition aimed to position the arts as a positive and driving force for society, in ‘Is This Tomorrow?’ it is wider developments, be they technological, social or political, that become the dangerous forces the collaborators seek to address. Review by Bernard Hay

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6, Roppongi, Minato City, Tokyo, Japan

Roppongi Crossing 2019: Connexions

Alter, [* Still image from: Justine Emard, Soul Shift, 2018, Video 6 min.]

Every three years the Mori Art Museum organises a new edition of ‘Roppongi Crossing’, a survey exhibition that presents a “snapshot” of Japan’s contemporary art scene. Begun in 2004, this year’s take on recent goings-on has been organised by the in-house curatorial team of Tsubaki Reiko, Tokuyama Hirokazu and Kumakura Haruko around the theme Connexions. Review by John Gayer

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Kadist, 19bis/21 rue des Trois Frères, Paris, 75018, France

Affective Utopia

Reynier Leyva Novo, A Thousand and One Times Revolution, 2009-2018, exhibition view Affective Utopia, KADIST, Paris.

Imagining utopia seems to have become the principal task of artists as of late, any speculative, social practice is quickly branded as such. So much so that the title of Kadist’s latest exhibition ‘Affective Utopia’ almost washes past unnoticed. Review by Jessica Saxby

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FACT, 88 Wood Street, Liverpool, L1 4DQ

Ericka Beckman & Marianna Simnett

Marianna Simnett films (Blood and The Udder)

Ericka Beckman and Marianna Simnett show the human female to be a rebellious creature, a feisty character, courageously challenging the dogma and stereotypical norms of her world. However, they do this in very contrasting ways and herein lies the intrinsic value of this exhibition. Review by Samantha Browne

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Eastside Projects, 86 Heath Mill Lane, Birmingham, B9 4AR

The Range

Eastside Projects, The Range, 2018, Photo: Stuart Whipps

Curated by artist Rehana Zaman, ‘The Range’ features new work by six artists, including Ain Bailey, Adam Farah and Beverley Bennett, following close to a year of mostly digital correspondence amongst the group. Internet culture provides much of the source material for their shared exploration and humour, as well as the show’s title, which makes reference to a ‘Little Britain’ sketch and the popular Twitter thread it inspired. Review by Divya Osbon

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