Viewing articles tagged with 'Group'

William Benington Gallery, unit 3, 50 Tower Bridge Rd, London SE1 4TR

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts #06 and #07

This is a show in two parts, the first of which blurs the artistic personas of the two artists in displaying a deconstructed functionless kit of parts throughout the gallery space, before – in part two – being reconfigured into a bench and other wall-based pieces, at which point the two artists’ practices are clearly delineated. Review by Matthew Turner

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Rennes

Rennes Biennale 2018: Cries and Echoes

Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, 40m Cube, Les Ateliers de Rennes

Siham and Hafida are two singers of the Aita, a musical genre of the Chikha. Their intergenerational conversations throughout the film give insight to how lived experience is transmitted and challenged by the fact that the younger generations learn the treats of the Aita through clips on youtube. Review by Helena Julian

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Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Affinity and Allusion

Dineo Seshee Bopape, [when spirituality was a baby], 2018, Collective City Dome

‘Affinity and Allusion’, the opening project at the new expanded Collective on Edinburgh’s Calton Hill, does not refer to a group show as such, as one might expect for the relaunch, or remaking and reimagining of an institution like this, but is rather a title of intention, focus and scope around the nature of exhibitions and displays, given to a cluster, or constellation (the theme of astronomy is in abundance here, given that the site is a former observatory), of complex activities. Review by Alex Hetherington

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The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield WF1 5AW

The Hepworth Prize for Sculpture

Installation shot of Michael Dean in The Hepworth Prize for Sculpture. 26 October 2018 - 20 January 2019.

Now in its second edition, the biannual £30,000 Hepworth Prize for Sculpture, presents us with five artists that serve to answer the question, ‘Where is contemporary sculpture headed?’ in one absolute way: everywhere and anywhere. With nothing off limits, everything and the kitchen sink can be found in this year’s shortlisted works, even some anticlimactic human hair … Review by Kit Edwards

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance

Installation view of Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Oct 2018 - Jan 2019, Nottingham Contemporary.

‘Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance’ is the first act of an exhibition showing a kind of history of resistance through the means of feminisms and intersectional queer thinking. The curators started to build the exhibition as an idea two years ago. Then, we didn’t have #metoo and #timesup, Trump wasn’t yet the POTUS, women’s marches weren’t so much in the news ... Review by Gulnaz Can

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Auto Italia, 44 Bonner Road, London E2 9JS

Gran Fury: Read My Lips

Kissing Doesn't Kill, Gran Fury, 1990, vinyl wall poster

‘Read My Lips’ is a powerful retrospective of agitprop collective Gran Fury, an autonomous unit stemming from the New York caucus of radical international direct action group ‘AIDs Coalition To Unleash Power’ or ACT UP. Review by Sophie Risner

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Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

Newstalgia

Elisabeth Molin, Ate Chocolate, (edible monuments) 2018

‘Newstalgia’ is shifting common ways of memorialisation into question. It does this through exposing attempts to activate social and cultural habits that remember and question contemporary ways to fulfil civil duties – to re-evaluate economic, cultural and societal operations. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

KNOCK KNOCK: Humour in Contemporary Art

Installation view of KNOCK KNOCK at South London Gallery (22 September - 18 November 2018) Pictured: She (2017) and KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN (2018) by Danielle Dean

Despite the show’s title, which has been taken from Roy Lichtenstein’s ‘Knock, Knock Poster’ (1976) and which appears in the main gallery, the exhibition refuses the monotony of formulaic joke-telling and instead employs irony and cynicism to create moments of discomfort and menace. Review by Olivia Aherne

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Space Shifters

Installation view of Alicja Kwade, WeltenLinie, 2017 at Space Shifters

Featuring work from over twenty artists, this final show of the Hayward’s 50th season hopes to alter your perception of space, sometimes dramatically, sometimes subtly. But, as objects in a rear-view mirror may in fact be larger than they appear, the reflective experience can be diminutive. Absorbing, yes. Engaging, yes. But shallow. Just ask Narcissus. Review by Adam Heardman

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Plymouth, UK

The Atlantic Project: After the Future

Echoic Candy (4-Bar)

Over the course of three weeks, a variety of unusual sites throughout Plymouth have been transformed into exhibition spaces, from pedestrianised streets and dilapidated buildings to shop-front windows, as part of The Atlantic Project: After The Future, a pilot biennial for the South West region. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Museum Frieder Burda | Salon Berlin, Auguststraße 11-13 10117 Berlin

Candice Breitz: Sex Work

TLDR (Featured here: Connie, Nosipho Vidima)

The film feels more like a piece of entertainment than it should, and it left less of an impact on me than the interviews themselves. One, in which a woman describes a horrifying act of rape by a police officer, will linger with me for a long time. Review by Siobhan Leddy

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Messums Wiltshire, Place Farm, Court St, Tisbury, Salisbury SP3 6LW

IMAGE

BREAKFAST

While the focus here is on portrait and documentary photography, the works in the barn present a rupture to a historically male-dominated practice. Contemporary works by artists such as Juno Calypso and Maisie Cousins, typified by vivid colours, theatrical staging and a disciplined control of the viewer’s gaze, challenge a legacy of image-making that has often elided female experience; highlighting the constructed nature of photography rather than offering it as guarantor of truth. Review by Daniel Pateman

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Survey

Installation View of Survey at Jerwood Space, London, 3 October - 16 December 2018.

An assembly of work from fifteen early career artists who have been nominated from across the UK, ‘Survey’ is an exhibition comprising a wide range of disciplines. From film, performance and drawing, to painting, ceramics and installation, it gives rising voices within the sector the opportunity to stand out and stand up. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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