Viewing articles tagged with 'Group'

Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd: Joins

Joins, Installation View, 2019, Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd

At the end of a long outdoor corridor filled with palms and tropical plants is Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd’s exhibition ‘Joins’ at Cell Project Space in East London. Bringing together a series of recent works, in addition to two spatial interventions in the gallery, the show explores the infrastructures that produce contemporary domestic space. Review by Bernard Hay

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arebyte Gallery, 7 Botanic Square, Leamouth Peninsula, London E14 0LG

RE-FIGURE-GROUND

Amina Ross, by your hands I open spill out. I'm the inside of an egg I pour we bloom magma rushing from a jagged crown of earth molten and dangerous and alive can't you feel (2018)

‘RE-FIGURE-GROUND’ asks us to re-examine our current positions and proposes alternative futures that go beyond the boundaries of race, gender and sex. Review by Julia Schouten

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Van Gogh Museum, Museumplein 6, 1071 DJ Amsterdam, Netherlands

Hockney - Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature

More Felled Trees on Woldgate

This is about perspective. In his landscapes, David Hockney, wants to challenge the ways people have learned to look at things. In the film which introduces ‘The Joy of Nature’, Hockney appears on-screen, a mixture of understated British chic and colourful Los Angeles ostentation, like a hipster Toby Jug. “In a way,” he muses, “Nature doesn’t really have perspective.” Review by Adam Heardman

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BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Digital Citizen - The Precarious Subject

Citizen Ex, Part of Digital Citizen, The Precarious Subject, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead

The technological revolution was meant to liberate us, but it has flooded society with endless torrents of information, cataracts of algorithms and a deluge of uncertainty. James Bridle has written fervent polemics warning us of our perilous fate should we not develop a new “systemic literacy” to navigate these unknown waters. Responding to his call, ‘Digital Citizen’ unites the work of ten artists to inspire conversations on citizenship, democracy, identity and reality in a digital world. Review by Christopher Little

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Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

We are the people. Who are you?

Funda Gul Ozcan, It Happened as Expected, 2018, Four channel video installation, looping, Dimensions variable

A timely exhibition, ‘We are the people. Who are you?’ is an insightful essay representing current anxieties over the health of our electoral democracy. The 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall is looming and as well as reflecting the unpredictable consequences of that historical moment for artists from the former Soviet bloc the show connects the ‘revolution’ of 1989 with the turning point of 2016’s US election and other historical pivots. Review by Piers Masterson

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TJ Boulting, 59 Riding House Street, Fitzrovia, London W1W 7EG

Subversive Stitch

Nike + Jöklasoley

In 1984, feminist art historian Rozsika Parker published ‘The Subversive Stitch – Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine’, in which she explored the sociocultural and gendered connotations of sewing and stitching across Western history. Now in 2019, TJ Boulting presents 'Subversive Stitch', a group show examining the legacy of embroidery today – another step in the creation of a contemporary canon of fabric as a serious artistic medium. Review by Anna Souter

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dlr Lexicon, Haigh Terrace, Moran Park, Dún Laoghaire, Ireland

Paul Hallahan & Lee Welch: And the tide was way out

Paul Hallahan & Lee Welch: And the tide was way out, dlr Lexicon, 2019

In ‘And the tide was way out’ we are presented with two distinct approaches by the artists to painting, and while they converge in two works at the centre of the main gallery space, their divergence dominates the duo exhibition. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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The Photographers' Gallery, 16-18 Ramillies St, Soho, London W1F 7LW

All I Know Is What’s On The Internet

Degoutin & Wagon, World Brain, 2015, HD Video. All I Know Is What Is On The Internet, on display at The Photographers' Gallery until 24 February 2019.

To this exhibition’s immense credit, it avoids engaging in knee-jerk satire of the American President. Instead, his words serve as a jumping-off point to consider the blurrier than ever line between fact and fiction, and the changing nature of ‘the image’. Review by Adam Heardman

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MO Museum, Pylimo g. 17, Vilnius 01141, Lithuania

All Art Is About Us

Installation view, All Art is About Us exhibition, MO Museum, Vilnius.

The inaugural exhibition, ‘All Art is About Us’, is made up predominantly of painting, video installation and photography from the museum’s collection of Lithuanian art. Review by Gulnaz Can

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The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019

Sofia Mitsola, Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019, installation view

For its spring show, Jerwood Visual Arts has commissioned new bodies of work from three artists at pivotal points in their careers: Kitty Clark, Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom and Sofia Mitsola. This is the fourth iteration of Jerwood Solo Presentations, and the guidance notes explain that there is no curatorial theme uniting the chosen artists; these are three very different offerings, but each is powerful in its own way. Review by Anna Souter

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William Benington Gallery, unit 3, 50 Tower Bridge Rd, London SE1 4TR

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts #06 and #07

This is a show in two parts, the first of which blurs the artistic personas of the two artists in displaying a deconstructed functionless kit of parts throughout the gallery space, before – in part two – being reconfigured into a bench and other wall-based pieces, at which point the two artists’ practices are clearly delineated. Review by Matthew Turner

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Rennes

Rennes Biennale 2018: Cries and Echoes

Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, 40m Cube, Les Ateliers de Rennes

Siham and Hafida are two singers of the Aita, a musical genre of the Chikha. Their intergenerational conversations throughout the film give insight to how lived experience is transmitted and challenged by the fact that the younger generations learn the treats of the Aita through clips on youtube. Review by Helena Julian

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