Viewing articles tagged with 'Group'

South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

KNOCK KNOCK: Humour in Contemporary Art

Installation view of KNOCK KNOCK at South London Gallery (22 September - 18 November 2018) Pictured: She (2017) and KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN (2018) by Danielle Dean

Despite the show’s title, which has been taken from Roy Lichtenstein’s ‘Knock, Knock Poster’ (1976) and which appears in the main gallery, the exhibition refuses the monotony of formulaic joke-telling and instead employs irony and cynicism to create moments of discomfort and menace. Review by Olivia Aherne

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Space Shifters

Installation view of Alicja Kwade, WeltenLinie, 2017 at Space Shifters

Featuring work from over twenty artists, this final show of the Hayward’s 50th season hopes to alter your perception of space, sometimes dramatically, sometimes subtly. But, as objects in a rear-view mirror may in fact be larger than they appear, the reflective experience can be diminutive. Absorbing, yes. Engaging, yes. But shallow. Just ask Narcissus. Review by Adam Heardman

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Plymouth, UK

The Atlantic Project: After the Future

Echoic Candy (4-Bar)

Over the course of three weeks, a variety of unusual sites throughout Plymouth have been transformed into exhibition spaces, from pedestrianised streets and dilapidated buildings to shop-front windows, as part of The Atlantic Project: After The Future, a pilot biennial for the South West region. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Museum Frieder Burda | Salon Berlin, Auguststraße 11-13 10117 Berlin

Candice Breitz: Sex Work

TLDR (Featured here: Connie, Nosipho Vidima)

The film feels more like a piece of entertainment than it should, and it left less of an impact on me than the interviews themselves. One, in which a woman describes a horrifying act of rape by a police officer, will linger with me for a long time. Review by Siobhan Leddy

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Messums Wiltshire, Place Farm, Court St, Tisbury, Salisbury SP3 6LW

IMAGE

BREAKFAST

While the focus here is on portrait and documentary photography, the works in the barn present a rupture to a historically male-dominated practice. Contemporary works by artists such as Juno Calypso and Maisie Cousins, typified by vivid colours, theatrical staging and a disciplined control of the viewer’s gaze, challenge a legacy of image-making that has often elided female experience; highlighting the constructed nature of photography rather than offering it as guarantor of truth. Review by Daniel Pateman

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Survey

Installation View of Survey at Jerwood Space, London, 3 October - 16 December 2018.

An assembly of work from fifteen early career artists who have been nominated from across the UK, ‘Survey’ is an exhibition comprising a wide range of disciplines. From film, performance and drawing, to painting, ceramics and installation, it gives rising voices within the sector the opportunity to stand out and stand up. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

fig-futures, WEEK 1 / EVA ROTHSCHILD + JOE MORAN

Eva Rothschild & Joe Moran, A Setup, 2018. fig-futures at Kettle's Yard, University of Cambridge.

In tight financial times, it is good to see this kind of generous programming, and the more concentrated format’s strength lies most especially in its potential for more intense, focused conversations between artists, artworks and disciplines as well as the opportunities for experimentation that such a short run provides. Review by Clare Robson

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RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London, W1B 1AD

Disappear Here: On perspective and other kinds of space

Disappear Here: On perspective and other kinds of space RIBA exhibition designed by Sam Jacob studio

“Disappear Here is not a history of perspective”, immediately declares the introductory wall text. Instead, RIBA’s exhibition offers a selection of curiously, sometimes bewilderingly, diverse, subversive readings of the system of spatial representation. Review by Henry Broome

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The Showroom, 63 Penfold St, Marylebone, London NW8 8PQ

Feminist Library

Feminist library installation view

Placing the ‘Expressions’ exhibition in direct dialogue with the ‘Feminist Library on Loan’ at The Showroom shows that local histories of women and non-binary people are important. Together, the two projects manifest a visible platform exposing the experiences of those living in the Church Street Ward in the context of feminist chronicles. Review by Ashley Janke

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Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont St, Oxford OX1 2PH

Spellbound

Concealed Shield

Spellbound is an exploration of meaning; instead of being disturbing for the reasons one might expect - it is in fact rather sad - it conjures a world where individuals struggle to guard against misfortune - to use the only defence they have against loss - that of magical thinking; and it becomes evident that we still possess that thought process today: in the form of the lovers’ padlocks cut from Leeds Centenary Bridge - a contemporary act of ritualistic magic, still existing in a western secular society. Review by Paul Black

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Michael Jackson: On the Wall

Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II (Michael Jackson)

The religious aspects of the exhibition are divided. Some works stand as testament to Jackson’s enigmatic international appeal. One room contains footage from the 1992 Dangerous world tour, revealing delirious crowds, a mass euphoria even outstripping Beatlemania: while the Fab Four played to 55,000 people at Shea Stadium in 1965, Jackson’s concert in Bucharest is estimated to have been attended by nearly 100,000. And the numbers don’t stop there: more than 1,000,000 fans are said to have congregated outside Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, while the televised spectacle itself is said to have been watched by more than 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. “We’re more popular than Jesus,” said Lennon of the Beatles in 1966. One wonders where this places Jackson. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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