Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

De La Warr Pavilion, Marina, Bexhill-on-Sea TN40 1DP

Simon Patterson: Safari: an exhibition as expedition

Simon Patterson, rehearsal of Seascape, 2017, with Bexhill Sailing Club

Simon Patterson’s ‘An Exhibition As Expedition’ takes you on a discursive and peripatetic journey, one which is immaterially played out in the mind of the visitor as they traverse the De Le Warr Pavilion. While doing this the artist sets out to undermine traditional bodies of 'stable' knowledge such as maps, museums and archives. Suggesting that meanings, not just in the world of art, are always in a state of shape shifting flux and that truth is just another strange sub-genre of fiction. Review by Matthew Turner

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

CONGLOMERATE: Station ID

CONGLOMERATE, Still from Desde el Jardin, directed by Sol Calero and Dafna Maimon, 2016.

An elaborate installation is the ‘absurdly complicated’ stage-set for the newest piece of ‘Gesamkunstwerk’ by Berlin-based artist collective CONGLOMERATE, presented at Tenderpixel as their first London-based project. The group comprises a core squadron of 5 artists and filmmakers including Sol Calero, Ethan Hayes-Chute, Derek Howard, Christopher Kline and Dafna Maimon, converging and disbanding at will in different cities and contexts in order to produce 30-minute ‘Blocks’ of programming that make a mess of traditional genres. Review by Alice Bucknell

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Estonia Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, San Samuele Square, San Marco 3199, 2nd floor, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2017: Katja Novitskova: If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes

Katja Novitskova, If Only You Could See What I've Seen with Your Eyes, exhibition view at the Estonian Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, 57th Venice Bienniale

Outside the entrance of the Estonian Pavilion in the 57th Venice Biennale, the phrase ‘If only you could see what I’ve seen with your eyes’ is printed on a poster in glowing red type. Katja Novitskova’s exhibition title originates from the 1982 post-apocalyptic film ‘Blade Runner’ and points toward several themes that run throughout the exhibition. Review by Ashley Janke

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Bluecoat, School Lane, Liverpool L1 3BX

Siobhan Davies Dance: material / rearranged / to / be

Siobhan Davies Dance, Material / rearranged / to / be at Bluecoat, 2017

‘Material / rearranged / to / be’ is a performative installation by Siobhan Davies Dance that completed its tour at Bluecoat. Daily performances took place throughout the day in the galleries and adjacent corridor. This was a complex proposition with new works by six choreographers, two visual artists and a design collective to create a landscape in flux. Kate Self reviews

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CANADA 333 Broome St, New York, NY 10002

Tomorrow Tomorrow

Installation view, Tomorrow Tomorrow, 2017

Tomorrow Tomorrow, curated by Stephanie Snyder, the Anne and John Hauberg Curator and Director of the Cooley Gallery, and Wallace Whitney, is a group exhibition featuring Demian DinéYazhi’ and Noelle Sosaya, MK Guth, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Kristan Kennedy, Evan La Londe, Charlie Perez-Tlatenchi, Michelle Ross, Storm Tharp, and Heather Watkins. These nine artists are preoccupied with physical abstraction, changeability, and working with materials to shape space with emotional purpose.

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David Roberts Art Foundation, Symes Mews, London NW1 7JE

Curators’ Series #10. Greater than the Sum by Kunsthalle Lissabon

Laure Prouvost, GDM future franchise, 2017 (details)

What role can the artist take in society? What path forward can a curator hope to illuminate? These are questions at the heart of the Kunsthalle Lissabon's programme, the Portuguese art institution that is currently exhibiting as part of DRAF’s Curator’s Series – only the second time an institution rather than an individual has been invited. In ‘Greater than the Sum,’ the two curators from the Kunsthalle Lissabon have taken full advantage of this rare privilege. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Galerie Ron Mandos, Prinsengracht 282, 1016 HJ Amsterdam

Troika: Glitches

All Colours White, 2017, Glitches, Installation View, Galerie Ron Mandos, 2017

Troika is a collaborative contemporary art practice formed in 2003 by Eva Rucki, Conny Freyer and Sebastien Noel and their first exhibition at Galerie Ron Mandos, in Amsterdam, Glitches, brings Troika’s site-specific installation Limits of a Known Territory (2015) to Europe for the first time to be shown alongside new and recent bodies of work.

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Vienna Secession Friedrichstraße 12, 1010 Vienna

Alex Da Corte

Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view

For his first major solo exhibition in Europe, Alex Da Corte has created a new work for the Vienna Secession.

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Makers Open 2017

Jessica Harrison, 54 Pins, 44 Followers (detail), 2017

The biannual Jerwood Makers Open returns for its sixth edition, presenting new works by Sam Bakewell, Juli Bolanos-Durman, Jessica Harrison, Marcin Rusak and Laura Youngson Coll. The five artists were selected from 271 applications and explore making as practice and process. Review by Edmée Lepercq

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Annka Kultys Gallery, 472 Hackney Rd, Unit 3, 1st Floor, London E2 9EQ

Signe Pierce: Faux Realities

Installation view 2017, Signe Pierce, Annka Kultys

“This is where it all started,” Signe Pierce points toward a lone print of a silhouetted palm tree that has somehow managed to wrangle free from the infinite scroll of neon-soaked imagery expanding across the walls of Annka Kultys Gallery for her ‘Faux Realities’ exhibition. Review by Alice Bucknell

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The Kitchen, 512 W 19th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

That I am reading backwards and into for a purpose, to go on

Installation view, That I am reading backwards and into for a purpose, to go on, The Kitchen

Initially I see and hear numerous bodies on screen; speaking, gesturing, rolling, walking, running, returning and repeating. But the space I inhabit, is absent of any consciously performing bodies. This exhibition is not ‘of’ performance, rather it invites thought on how performance and the performer can be positioned to challenge current inequality, oppression and false-truths. Cicely Farrer reviews

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