Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Imperial War Museum London, Lambeth Rd, London SE1 6HZ

Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11

Surveillance Camera with Plinth

The compulsion of artists to respond to certain events as they unfold, as exemplified by artists in Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11 at the Imperial War Museum, London, raises unavoidable questions concerning the relationship between aesthetics and morality. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Art in General, 145 Plymouth St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA

Zach Blas: Contra-Internet

Zach Blas, Jubilee 2033 (film still) 2018. Commissioned by Gasworks, London; Art in General, New York; and MU, Eindhoven

Zach Blas’ debut US solo show, Contra-Internet, at Art in General, New York, is a 28-minute long film, ‘Jubilee 2033’, inspired by the opening sequence of Derek Jarman’s seminal queer punk film ‘Jubilee’ (1978). Blas’ film imagines the jubilee of the internet in 2033 and evidences his broader endeavour ‘to explore contemporary technology in relationship to feminism and queerness’. Review by Grace Storey

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage

Photo caption - Installation view, 2018 Triennial: “Songs for Sabotage”

While each painting on view in the 2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage, at the New Museum, New York, might pack a punch on its own, when grouped, this pervasive, globalized homogeneity only undercuts the swollen pomp ascribed to Songs of Sabotage by its organizers, and points, perhaps, to a more sinister condescension afoot in the galleries themselves. Review by Torey Akers

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Museo Rufino Tamayo, Paseo de la Reforma 51, Bosque de Chapultepec, Bosque de Chapultepec I Secc, 11580 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans, Museo Tamayo, installation view, 2018

The achievement of Wyn Evan’s show at the Museo Tamayo is to take an architectural space; equal parts gallery and auditorium, and to bring these identities together. On one side is the visual allure of the neon, a medium which seems to endlessly delight, on the other, is the music of nature and humanity; a concert exists between them. Review by Elliott Burns

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Hauser & Wirth Zürich, Limmatstrasse 270, 8005 Zürich

Larry Bell Venice Fog: Recent Investigations

Installation view, 'Larry Bell. Venice Fog: Recent Investigations', Hauser & Wirth Zurich, 2018

A fixation with glass structures and their interactions with light have dominated Larry Bell’s practice throughout his career. In his latest exhibition, Venice Fog: Recent Investigations, at Hauser & Wirth, Zürich, Bell continues his fascination with this material, drawing inspiration from the atmospheric fog of Californian mornings. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

No, No, No, No

No, No, No, No Installation View, 2018

Through the use of verbal and visual puns, the works displayed in ‘No, No, No, No’ convey irony and humour, and challenge the audience by playing with ideas of authorship, making and presenting art, and even appropriating existing artworks. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Margaret Salmon: Circle

Installation view, Margaret Salmon: Circle, Tramway, Glasgow, 2018

American Glasgow-based artist Margaret Salmon’s filmic, atmospheric and carefully rendered installation, sensitive to the nuances of people, the subtleties of places and objects (and her relationships to them) is housed in Tramway’s immense principal space. It renders the space quieter than normal, in half-light – a place for a rare, esoteric experience. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Public spaces around Europe and Iran – Darbast Platform

Tara Fatehi Irani: Mishandled Archive

Mishandled Archive, Tara Fatehi Irani, Tehran (2018)

What we see and hear in ‘Mishandled Archive’ is not limited to one narrator – several voices are heard. It is as if we are wandering in the aural and visual space of a polyphonic text that relieves the many voices of its characters from a singular dominant authority. Review by Helia Hamedani

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Nest, in collaboration with Stichting Electriciteitsfabriek, De Constant Rebecqueplein 20, 2518 RA The Hague, Netherlands

Zoro Feigl: Infinity

Pressurising 2010

Whether extended to hang loosely, to bumble about on the floor or transport veils of colourful gunk skyward, the works in Zoro Feigl's latest exhibition, Infinity, at the Nest, The Hague, in collaboration with Stichting Electriciteitsfabriek, demonstrate that their power resides in their ability to enthrall and maintain a poetic presence. Review by John Gayer

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Lydia Ourahmane: The you in us

Lydia Ourahmane, In the Absence of our Mothers (2018). Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

A golden tooth is unassumingly mounted on a pin, sticking out of the wall. A cabinet with documents is standing next to it. In the middle hangs an x-ray. It takes another moment to realise a low humming is coming from the floorboards. It finds resonance with the room, with the bodies in it, and creates a feeling of being ‘within’ something latently present. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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650mAh, Mist Vape Shop, 41 Western Road, Hove, BN3 1JD

Jack Lavender - Sorry I haven’t been

Jack Lavender, Untitled (car cover, stereo, lights, resin statue), 2018

LED lights trace the floor’s edge and bathe the room in a purple haze. The beams evoke the luminescence of whizzing cars on the motorway and trigger nostalgic memories of long night-time drives and the open road – Lavender’s car hurtles down a motorway of a bygone time. Review by Sophie Ruigrok

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Rotterdam, Netherlands

International Film Festival Rotterdam

SLEEPCINEMAHOTE installation view IFFR 2018

The International Film Festival Rotterdam 2018, now in its 47th edition, flirts with the boundaries of art and film throughout the city with powerful and exciting works by Nicolas Provost, Hiwa K, Agnieszka Polska and Artur Zmijewski among others. But just how far does the synthesis between cinema and fine art achieve new experiences in viewing? Review by Laurence Scherz

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Thomas Bock and Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate

James and Henry Barnard

The first UK-exhibition dedicated to the work of the Birmingham-born convict artist, Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855), at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, is paired with the concurrent exhibition, Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate. This was the the result of a three-year residency spent by the artist at HMP Grendon – Europe’s only entirely therapeutic prison. Despite widely differing careers they both viscerally remind us of the dangers of denying any person a sense of identity. Review by Sara Jaspan

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