Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

staring forms: Miranda Blennerhassett, Aleana Egan, Andreas Kindler von Knobloch, Tanad Williams

staring forms, installation image, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Mid-way through ‘A Game of Chess’, the second section of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem ‘The Waste Land’, come the words that have lent themselves to the title of ‘staring forms’, a new group exhibition in Dublin’s Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. In these lines Eliot references the ancient (and violent) Greek myth of King Tereus and the sisters Philomela and Procne, all three of whom were turned into birds by the gods. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Heidi Schwegler and Quayola: Plane of Scattered Pasts

Athazagoraphobia

In ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ at Upfor Gallery in Portland, Oregon, artists Heidi Schwegler and Quayola explore object histories and the fragmentation process with sculptural works and video. Schwegler amends, recasts, and highlights aged objects to reframe their value. Quayola’s video piece ‘Strata #1’ (2008) invigorates the exhibition with immersive sound and vivid colour. While the show focuses on the fragmented form, ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ is conceptually complete. Review by Lindsay Costello

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Kettle's Yard, Castle Street, Cambridge, CB3 0AQ

Oscar Murillo: Violent Amnesia

Oscar Murillo, Violent Amnesia, 2019. Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge

“No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” Oscar Murillo’s current exhibition at Kettle’s Yard starts with these words by John Donne. This quote is a testimony of the artist’s mourning for his friend, Nigerian curator and unique contributor to the art world, Okwui Enwezor, who died earlier this year. But it makes me think that if Murillo were an island, he would have been a floating island. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Mandy El-Sayegh: Cite Your Sources

Mandy El-Sayegh, Cite Your Sources (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019.

Verbal language dominates and hits you like a wave; pages from the Financial Times are pasted up the gallery walls and underfoot; silk-screened advertising copy, schematics and Arabic calligraphy are layered on top of maps, passport-photocopies, grids and each other. Review by India Nielsen

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Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Krymsky Val, 9 строение 32, Moskva, Russia, 119049

Pavel Pepperstein: The Human as a Frame for the Landscape

Pavel Pepperstein, The Human as a Frame for the Landscape, installation view, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, 2019

The work of Pavel Pepperstein is, to western audiences, often impenetrable — not least because it often relies upon references to in-jokes and Russian-Language text. Pepperstein is interested in exploding-out historical moments and psychedelic experiences and picking through the debris. He’s called it “the spiritual backstage”. Review by Lucy Holt

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6, Roppongi, Minato City, Tokyo, Japan

Roppongi Crossing 2019: Connexions

Alter, [* Still image from: Justine Emard, Soul Shift, 2018, Video 6 min.]

Every three years the Mori Art Museum organises a new edition of ‘Roppongi Crossing’, a survey exhibition that presents a “snapshot” of Japan’s contemporary art scene. Begun in 2004, this year’s take on recent goings-on has been organised by the in-house curatorial team of Tsubaki Reiko, Tokuyama Hirokazu and Kumakura Haruko around the theme Connexions. Review by John Gayer

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Fabrica, 40 Duke Street, Brighton, BN1 1AG

Serge Attukwei Clottey: Current Affairs

Serge Attukwei Clottey: Current Affairs, Fabrica, 18th April - 27th May 2019

On one of the hundreds of yellow plastic segments cut and woven together to form Serge Attukwei Clottey’s monumental tapestry work, someone has written in black marker, so small you might miss it amongst the waves of bright colour, “Exodus 17”. It’s unclear if the scribbled allusion has been added by the artist or whether it remains from the material’s previous life as a jerry can, used to carry cooking oil and then water in drought-hit areas of Ghana. Review by Adam Heardman

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Hauser & Wirth, Durslade Farm Dropping Lane, Bruton Somerset BA10 0NL

Matthew Day Jackson: Pathetic Fallacy

Installation view, Matthew Day Jackson, Pathetic Fallacy, Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 2019

“Our engagement with nature, to occupy it and to flatten it to a certain extent … That’s the beginning point,” says artist Matthew Day Jackson on his exhibition ‘Pathetic Fallacy’, the result of a months’ residency in Somerset. During his time in England, the American artist had what he described as a mind-blowing experience of the countryside and kept thinking about how space was organised around the human body, nature, architecture and sculpture. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Eastside Projects, 86 Heath Mill Lane, Birmingham, B9 4AR

The Range

Eastside Projects, The Range, 2018, Photo: Stuart Whipps

Curated by artist Rehana Zaman, ‘The Range’ features new work by six artists, including Ain Bailey, Adam Farah and Beverley Bennett, following close to a year of mostly digital correspondence amongst the group. Internet culture provides much of the source material for their shared exploration and humour, as well as the show’s title, which makes reference to a ‘Little Britain’ sketch and the popular Twitter thread it inspired. Review by Divya Osbon

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Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, 521 W 21st St #1, New York, NY 10011, USA

Laura Lima : I hope this finds you well.

Nomad

Brazilian artist Laura Lima’s work has infamously flouted even the most provisional classifications art discourses run on today, let alone the traditional ones. Based in Rio de Janeiro, and initially spurred on by interests in law and philosophy, Lima continues to cultivate a body of work that builds on post-relational art concerns and the aesthetic, if not political, principles espoused by the fallout of the Brazilian Neo-Concrete Movement, in both theory and practice. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 118 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen

Cecilia Vicuna: About to Happen, February 1 – March 31, 2019, installation view, Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. Photos: Constance Mensh

Cecilia Vicuña’s first major solo exhibition presents a delicate balancing act between the large- and small-scale, and between works that are explicitly political and those that are more personal. Combining textiles, video, found objects, wood, paper, poetry, and more, ‘About to Happen’ is grounded in the artist’s dedication to her craft and to her advocacy, often making the most impact with the most intimate, fragile works. Review by Deborah Krieger

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Kohta, Teurastamo inner yard, Työpajankatu 2B, building 7, 3rd floor, 00580 Helsinki, Finland

Britta Marakatt-Labba: History in Stitches

Britta Marakatt-Labba:Untitled (2018-19), textile, embroidery

How strange to step from snow-filled streets and the twilight of a late winter afternoon in Helsinki into Kohta’s radiant space and find oneself confronted by scenes executed in similarly atmospheric and subdued tones. Looking reveals an unfamiliar world, fashioned by Britta Marakatt-Labba’s unique cultural background and artistic approach. Review by John Gayer

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BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Digital Citizen - The Precarious Subject

Citizen Ex, Part of Digital Citizen, The Precarious Subject, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead

The technological revolution was meant to liberate us, but it has flooded society with endless torrents of information, cataracts of algorithms and a deluge of uncertainty. James Bridle has written fervent polemics warning us of our perilous fate should we not develop a new “systemic literacy” to navigate these unknown waters. Responding to his call, ‘Digital Citizen’ unites the work of ten artists to inspire conversations on citizenship, democracy, identity and reality in a digital world. Review by Christopher Little

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Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

Raqs Media Collective, Not Yet At Ease, 2018. Modular padded structure with fabric ceiling, padded stools. Six videos displayed on four monitors and two projections, six channel audio. Dimensions variable.

‘Spinal’, Raqs Media Collective's exhibition at Frith Street Gallery, features the installation ‘Not Yet At Ease’. It reflects on the mental state created by the discomfort and exploitation of First World War soldiers of Asian heritage. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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