Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Kunsthalle Lissabon, R. José Sobral Cid 9E, 1900-312 Lisboa, Portugal

Laure Prouvost: Melting into one another ho hot chaud it heating dip

 Laure Prouvost: Melting into one another ho hot chaud it heating dip. General views of the exhibition. Kunsthalle Lissabon. Photos: Bruno Lopes. Courtesy of the artist and Kunsthalle Lissabon.

To go in is to deep-dive, to move down, to curve the body and bow the head; you have been made permeable by a dark, whispering underworld that slackens and contracts around you. That I am experiencing Laure Prouvost’s immersive ‘Melting into one another ho hot chaud it heating dip’ at Kunsthalle Lissabon from behind my laptop screen is an irony not lost. Review by Inês Geraldes Cardoso

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Castor Projects, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London SE8 4AL

Rafal Zajko: Resuscitation

Installation view with Zajko as Chochol

Breathing and the nature of our bodies as something that air passes through have never been considered so urgently as in this show. Rafal Zajko, a London-based, Polish artist, has been making wall-based works that look like vents for a year - a fact I discovered during a remote conversation with Zajko to discuss his exhibition, Resuscitation, at Castor Projects in London, which was open for just one day before its closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Review by Laura O’Leary

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Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia, 270 River Road Athens, GA 30602

Multiple Entry Points to Dis-ease: A Conversation with Amiko Li

The Purpose of Disease, Installation view at Dodd Galleries, University of Georgia, 2020

Amiko Li’s 'The Purpose of Disease,' curated by Katie Geha, opened at The Dodd Galleries at the Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia, on February 27th, 2020, but was closed prematurely by the outbreak of Covid-19 in the U.S. Nevertheless, the show’s relevance continues to proliferate. Li began the research for this work in 2017 upon discovery of a mysterious rash spreading across his body. As he investigated remedies for the condition, other threads of research, ranging from tetrachromacy in birds and the relationship between photographs and text, gradually converged experiences of mind and body. The following conversation with Li considers the multiple entry points to embodied and cultural dis-ease. Written by Laurel V. McLaughlin

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Billytown, Helena van Doeverenplantsoen 3, 2512 ZB The Hague, Netherlands

Ide André: Just a Satisfying Spiral

Just a Satisfying Spiral by Ide Andre at Billytown, The Hague

There is something very compelling about Ide André’s ‘Just a Satisfying Spiral’ that impresses itself on the viewer right upon entry. The airy exhibition hall not only bolsters the lively and idiosyncratic nature of the works by giving them ample space to breathe, but it also suites the dynamism that pervades the show’s constituents. Viewers quickly notice that they are in a transitional zone. Review by John Gayer

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Museum of Art of São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand, Avenida Paulista, 1578 / Casa de Vidro Lina Bo Bardi, Rua General Almério de Moura, 200, São Paulo, Brazil

Leonor Antunes: joints, voids and gaps

Installation image, Leonor Antunes: joints, voids and gaps

I didn’t immediately see Leonor Antunes’s works at Lina Bo Bardi’s ‘Casa de Vidro’ (Glass House), which is to say, I saw them without apprehending them to be out of place. The tortuous steel, twisting in controlled but vital serpentines against the dense green vegetation that rushes in through the porous windows, could have merely been part of the eclectic collection of objects dotted around Bo Bardi’s living room. Ultimately, their undulating verticality - an enduring trademark of Antunes’s sculptural practice - gave them away. Review by Inês Geraldes Cardoso

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The Modern Institute, 14-20 Osborne St, Glasgow G1 5QN

Marco Giordano: To Disturb Somnolent Birds

Dopey Birds

At the threshold of consciousness and sleep, nineteen resin sculptures lit by LED rest on a wooden bench, marking the entry into Marco Giordano’s reverie. Eerie whispers fill the gallery, transporting visitors to continents far away, into a dream-like state. Time is suspended by an ethereal soundtrack; a lullaby calling to “sing or sink” reverberates across the gallery space. Review by Elaine Y.J Zheng

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Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, United States

Danielle Roney: Frequencies of Opacity

Danielle Roney: Frequencies of Opacity, Upfor Gallery

Blinking LED lights on the half-moon steel curves of ‘Strata Series: Zero’ and ‘Strata Series: Zero_One’ (both 2020) ascend and descend, irradiating the forms suspended from the ceiling and resting precariously on the floor. They illuminate the voices of migrants. Danielle Roney’s exhibition at Upfor Gallery, ‘Frequencies of Opacity’, imagines how migrants, violently labelled as illegal, could clandestinely occupy institutions and perhaps create renewed borderlands through technology. Review by Laurel V. McLaughlin

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Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, St James's, New Cross, London SE14 6AD

Transparent Things

Installation view of Transparent Things (2020), at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, London

It’s not uncommon for art or exhibitions to draw upon philosophical or literary sources for inspiration. The 56th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale in 2015 staged daily readings of Marx’s ‘Das Kapital’ (1867); the seed for Cally Spooner’s performance at the New Museum, New York in 2016 ‘On False Tears and Outsourcing’ was a scene from Flaubert’s ‘Madame Bovary’ (1856); and Tai Shani’s presentation at the 2019 Turner Prize was based on a 1405 text by poet Christine de Pizan. Review by Kirsty White

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Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Julijonas Urbonas: Planet of People

A Planet of People, Collective, 2020

Julijonas Urbonas is an artist, a designer, the former head of an amusement park, a researcher, and the founder of the Lithuanian Space Agency - an organisation dedicated to the investigation of imaginary celestial architectural projects. For his exhibition at Collective, Urbonas has created a new iteration of ‘Planet of People’: an evolving participatory installation that explores what would happen if, instead of humans colonising existing planets, there was a planet made entirely of human bodies. Review by Clare Robson

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BALTIC, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings

Amalia Pica, Yerkish, 2018. Courtesy the artist and Herald Street Gallery. Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art 2019.

The curator of the show, Filipa Ramos, says that the starting point is Deleuze’s text 'Becoming-Animal', but it goes beyond the theory. Deleuze, while writing about Francis Bacon, states that between human and animal, there is a deep identity, a zone of indiscernibility, that is more profound than any sentimental identification. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Mother’s Tankstation, 31-43 Watling St, Usher's Island, The Liberties, Dublin 8, D08 NP48, Ireland

Niamh O’Malley: Placeholder

Park shapes

The first work you encounter on entering mother’s tankstation to see Niamh O’Malley’s ‘Placeholder’ is ‘Gather’ (2019), a balance of strength and delicacy with its coloured glass cuboids that are pierced and supported by a steel bar. This is the only ‘old’ work in this new exhibition and it is hardly old at all having been shown late last year in O’Malley’s ‘handle’ in Dublin’s RHA. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave, Seattle, WA 98104, USA

Agnieszka Polska: Love Bite

What the Sun Has Seen (still)

What if the sun spoke back to the world? Agnieszka Polska’s videos ‘The New Sun’ and ‘What the Sun Has Seen’ (both 2017) conjure this ecological encounter at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle, exhibited for the first time in the U.S. in the exhibition ‘Love Bite’ and curated by Amanda Donnan. Review by Laurel V. McLaughlin

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The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Gabriel Kuri: spending static to save gas

spending static to save gas, 2020, installation view

There is a comforting routine to visiting exhibitions in Dublin’s Douglas Hyde Gallery - you enter the foyer and walk past the main desk to the top of the staircase, which gives a sweeping preview of the work as you descend into the gallery’s main space, your foot hitting the same spot each time. This comfort has been removed by Gabriel Kuri’s radical structural intervention ‘spending static to save gas’ (2020), featured in his exhibition of the same name. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Kettle's Yard, Castle St, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Linderism

Glorification de l'Elue

Beyond the punk façade of the artist known just as ‘Linder’, there is an intricate weaver of narratives and miner of myths to be found. Kettle’s Yard’s sensory and expansive retrospective makes this apparent. Review by Clare Robson

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