Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Athens, Greece

Documenta 14: Athens

Rebecca Belmore, Biinjiya'iing Onji (From inside), 2017, marble, Filopappou Hill, Athens, documenta 14

Documenta 14: 'Learning from Athens' promised to address some of the current social and political issues facing Europe today by questioning its foundations: colonialism, patriarchy, gender-normativity and capitalism. Yet many feared that the exhibition tried to glamorise the ‘Greek crisis’ and capitalise on what is a very complex and difficult social and economic situation. What’s in it for Athens? Review by Anaïs Castro

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Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, Treitlstraße 2, 1040 Vienna, Austria

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses, installation view at Kunsthalle Wien, 2017.

Before entering Camille Henrot’s solo exhibition ‘If Wishes Were Horses,’ the viewer is required to remove their shoes. While this serves the practical function of not damaging the floor, it is also an intimate gesture with associations of religious worship, the comfort of being at home, privacy, or even sensuality. Review by Deborah Krieger

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Kunstraum, 21 Roscoe Street, London EC1Y 8PT

Sophie Jung: Producing My Credentials

Sophie Jung, Producing My Credentials, Kunstraum, London, 2017.

‘Producing My Credentials’ is a series of performances and an exhibition that invites the audience to enter an audacious and curious version of Sophie Jung’s memory theatre. Review by Christian Lübbert

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1F 9DY

Annette Messager: avec et sans raisons

Installation view of Annette Messager, avec et sans raisons, Marian Goodman Gallery London 19 April - 27 May 2017

‘Daily’ (2016) features ropes of black thread akin to dusted cobwebs, a recurring thematic throughout the show used to strangle and surrender items of gigantic proportions; scissors, combs, keys and locks. Items charged with domestic associations lie surrendered in mid-air, transfixed and immobile, a metaphor for frustration which is echoed in the exhibition’s accompanying work. Review by Sophie Risner

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Furtherfield Gallery, The McKenzie Pavilion, Harringay, London N4 2NQ

PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.

Refugee Flag, Installation view at Furtherfield Gallery, 2017

‘PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.’ announces itself with a song and a flag. Yara Said’s ‘Refugee Nation’ flag, designed in lifejacket orange for stateless participants of the 2016 Olympics, floats over the small pavilion in Finsbury Park housing Furtherfield Gallery. Review by David Morris

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945. Installation View, Barbican Art Gallery, London, 23 March - 25 June 2017

This is an exhibition that, alongside showing ground breaking architectural designs and their socio-economical contexts, attempts to dig deeper into the psyche of the Japanese family. Spread across two floors centred around a courtyard with lovingly reconstructed walk-through models of contemporary Japanese rooms, the show allows us to sense what it’s like to live in these finest examples of nanotecture. Review by Dominika Mackiewicz

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

A World View: John Latham

A World View, John Latham, Speak, 1962, Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London, 1 March 2017 - 21 May 2017

Neither chronological nor particularly thematic, the show’s organisation drives home one of the main characteristics of Latham’s work: to a greater or lesser extent all of it reflects his peculiar and esoteric theories of universal time, and his theory of art as event. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Copenhagen Contemporary, Trangravsvej 10–12, 1436 Copenhagen K

Anselm Kiefer: For Louis-Ferdinand Céline: Voyage au bout de la nuit

Anselm Kiefer. For Louis-Ferdinand Céline: Voyage au bout de la nuit. Installation shot, Copenhagen Contemporary 2016.

Four full-size aeroplanes occupy the corners of the vast gallery, each based on a 20th century warplane from Kiefer’s private collection. They are impotent, made from malleable lead and brittle zinc and leaning on rusted props and boulders. Giant poppies burst from a cockpit and ripped-open wings are adorned with sunflowers or weighed down with Kiefer’s signature lead books. Review by Jessie Bond

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OUTPOST, 10b Wensum Street, Norwich, NR3 1HR

Rebecca Ackroyd: House Fire

Rebecca Ackroyd: House Fire, installation view at OUTPOST, 2017

Lodged in the entrance of a former Skittle Salon in Norwich, the home of Outpost gallery, are the hips of a nude female. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Whitney Biennial 2017

Installation Occupy Museums,  Debtfair, 2017  ( 2017 Whitney Biennial, March 17—June 11, 2017).  Thirty artworks and interactive website.  Whitney Museum of American Art

The 78th instalment of the Whitney Biennial for 2017 - which always aims for the zeitgeist and the seminal - opens at a time of crisis not only in the United States, but around the world. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

David Ferrando Giraut: The Accursed Stare

David Ferrando Giraut, CATOPTROPHILIA, 2013. Installation view.

David Ferrando Giraut’s recent works weave a neon path through progressive economic theories and 17,000 years of image-making, arriving at the present day clad in Louboutin and dripping in gold. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Ort Gallery, 500-504 Moseley Road, Birmingham B12 9AH

Kristina Cranfeld: In This Perfect British Landscape…

Kristina Cranfeld: In This Perfect British Landscape... installation view at Ort Gallery, 2017

This tight and timely show from Kristina Cranfeld comprises two projected films, ‘Manufactured Britishness’ and ‘Dukes Rise’, both absurdist takes on the current immigration crisis and the nostalgic fantasy of resurrecting the Great British identity. Review by Elli Resvanis

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 10002

A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving

A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving, installation view at New Museum, New York, 2017

'Shabby but Thriving' at the New Museum is an installation, centred on a two-channel video, that extends A.K. Burns’ trans-feminist practice. Review by Rusty Van Riper

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