Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

OUTPOST, 10b Wensum Street, Norwich, NR3 1HR, UK

Jennifer Campbell: G L A M O R O U S

Jennifer Campbell: G L A M O R O U S

Taking G L A M O R O U S - the most memorable line from Fergie’s popular R&B hit (of the same name) as a starting point, I present and dissect the word "glamorous".

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Transfer Gallery, 1030 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life installation view

Contrary to the exhibition’s title, which suggests a state of stasis, Holberton’s work oscillates between analogue and digital, animate and inanimate, in order to destablise the notion of these binaries, and explore the possibility of a third space. Review by Grace Storey

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Banner Repeater, Hackney Downs Network Rail, Platform 1 Dalston Ln, London E8 1LA

De-Leb

De-Leb at Banner Repeater installation view

The exhibition presents a set of possible borders, or more precisely, gives us a kit of instruments to delineate the fitful, slippery and serpentine edges of technology so we can keep control of the data hidden within the substrata of our bodies. The show is more of a virus than an art exhibition, one that sets out to disrupt the control systems that invisibly ensnare us all. Review by Matthew Turner

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Yto Barrada: Agadir

Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View with performers Nick Armfield, Rory Francis, Tallulah Bond and Jonny Lavelle, Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View, The Curve, Barbican Centre, 7 February - 20 May 2018

Commissioned by the Barbican as part of the ‘Art of Change’ programme, Moroccan-born artist Yto Barrada has taken over the Curve gallery with a display of loss, separation and re-emergence. Referencing the novel ‘Agadir’ by Mohammed Khaïr Eddine, the artist reworks the spinal layout of the gallery as a fragmented timeline. Using photography, film, performance and collage, Barrada guides us through a history of colonialism, political subversion and the failure of a Modernist architectural utopia, all wrapped up in an event – an earthquake – that all but destroyed the city in fifteen seconds in 1960. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Roman Road, 69 Roman Road, London E2 0QN

Alix Marie: La Femme Fontaine

Alix Marie: La Femme Fontaine, installation view, Roman Road, London, 5 April - 20 May 2018.

Water declares itself the primary medium of Alix Marie’s ‘La Femme Fontaine’ – its presence in the gallery is inescapable. Running through long, clear tubes, it finds its way into every corner of the space. It scales the high walls only to come back to the ground. It trickles audibly into shining silver bowls and the splashing carries and echoes. It spills on to the floor, collecting in shallow puddles. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Castlefield Gallery, 2 Hewitt Street Manchester, M15 4GB

Ruth Barker & Hannah Leighton-Boyce

Ruth Barker, Victory, 2013, Her whole self, 2018

Set against the backdrop of the centenary celebrations of the suffragette movement, Castlefield Gallery's exhibition – which is co-commissioned with the University of Salford Art Collection – is the result of Ruth Barker and Hannah Leighton-Boyce's year-long research and production residencies. Throughout 2017, the two artists exchanged ideas from their respective locations in Salford and Glasgow; each delving into the long-standing archives of either the University of Salford Art Collection or the Glasgow Women's Library in order to formulate new visual narratives. Review by Selina Oakes

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Spanien 19C, Kalkværksvej 5A, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark

Mette Boel: Sunkissed

Mette Boel, Sunkissed, 2018, exhibition view, udstillingsstedet Spanien 19c, Aarhus.

Trainers pair up with swimming pool noodles to create weird, often amusing pairings, as the noodles appear to be wearing shoes and claim the space for themselves. Posters look like tourist ads and then again not. Then there is the sand on the floor, which reminds us of relaxing days at the beach. Yet, here, the sand does not move; it has become like a carpet. Not a carpet to lie down upon, but something to investigate, to brush up against. Review by Rikke Hansen

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kurimanzutto, Gobernador Rafael Rebollar 94, San Miguel Chapultepec I Secc, 11850 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Sarah Lucas: DAME ZERO

Sarah Lucas, installation view of DAME ZERO, kurimanzutto, Mexico City, 2018. Images courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City.

Whilst firmly rooted in the irreverent humour of Britain, Sarah Lucas: DAME ZERO, currently on view at kurimanzutto, Mexico City, is able to securely locate itself within (as if emerging from) the context of Mexico. Review by Elliott Burns

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Kader Attia: The Field of Emotion

Kader Attia: The Field of Emotion. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2018

Amid the celebrations of Canada’s 150th birthday last year, there prevailed an anxiety surrounding its colonial origins, and the efforts to reconcile past and continuing mistreatment of its indigenous groups with its modern national identity. It’s within this context that French artist Kader Attia stages his first major exhibition in the country, Fields of Emotion at the Power Plant, Toronto. Presenting a series of works dealing with political and individual traumas, Attia traces a thread of genealogies and histories which offset sanitized narratives and explores the lingering impact of atrocities left unaddressed or disavowed. Review by Alec Kerr

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Lilah Fowler: nth nature

Lilah Fowler: nth nature, 2018

The city is striated into manifold ordered grids that similarly control our movements. The Nevada desert on the other hand, one of the locations Lilah Fowler explored for her show at Assembly Point, has no such boundaries and borders – it has an order more in common with a modulating weather system than any Cartesian geometry. Review by Matthew Turner

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Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke St, Oxford OX1 1BP

Cinthia Marcelle: The Family in Disorder: Truth or Dare

Cinthia Marcelle, The Family in Disorder: Truth or Dare installation view, 2018.

Upon entering the upper gallery of Modern Art Oxford, there is something slightly reminiscent of an art foundation course exhibition in 'The Family in Disorder: Truth or Dare' (2018), an installation of 'exploded' materials, as if students had been asked to explore those materials, languages, and meanings, resulting in a rather haphazard assemblage. Review by Paul Black

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Hazel Brill

Hazel Brill, Woke Up in Spring, 2018, Mixed media video installation, 9 mins. Solo Invites exhibition, 1 March - 8 April 2018.

Hazel Brill’s new video installation ‘Woke Up in Spring’ presents a compendium of media and cultural references that build up a layered picaresque of the artist’s exploration of her environment. Review by Piers Masterson

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Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 140 George St, The Rocks NSW 2000, Australia

21st Biennale of Sydney: SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

21st Biennale of Sydney, SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement installation view

Artistic Director Mami Kataoka utilizes the concept of Superposition as a metaphor for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Superposition is a theory borrowed from quantum mechanics, it posits that different, even seemingly conflicting, components are held in suspension - equal in their difference and vital to the whole. This metaphor seeks to bring the different threads, directions, contradictions and loose-ends that exist in our contemporary world into a (utopian) balance. Review by Kathleen Linn

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