Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

A World View: John Latham

A World View, John Latham, Speak, 1962, Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London, 1 March 2017 - 21 May 2017

Neither chronological nor particularly thematic, the show’s organisation drives home one of the main characteristics of Latham’s work: to a greater or lesser extent all of it reflects his peculiar and esoteric theories of universal time, and his theory of art as event. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Copenhagen Contemporary, Trangravsvej 10–12, 1436 Copenhagen K

Anselm Kiefer: For Louis-Ferdinand Céline: Voyage au bout de la nuit

Anselm Kiefer. For Louis-Ferdinand Céline: Voyage au bout de la nuit. Installation shot, Copenhagen Contemporary 2016.

Four full-size aeroplanes occupy the corners of the vast gallery, each based on a 20th century warplane from Kiefer’s private collection. They are impotent, made from malleable lead and brittle zinc and leaning on rusted props and boulders. Giant poppies burst from a cockpit and ripped-open wings are adorned with sunflowers or weighed down with Kiefer’s signature lead books. Review by Jessie Bond

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OUTPOST, 10b Wensum Street, Norwich, NR3 1HR

Rebecca Ackroyd: House Fire

Rebecca Ackroyd: House Fire, installation view at OUTPOST, 2017

Lodged in the entrance of a former Skittle Salon in Norwich, the home of Outpost gallery, are the hips of a nude female. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Whitney Biennial 2017

Installation Occupy Museums,  Debtfair, 2017  ( 2017 Whitney Biennial, March 17—June 11, 2017).  Thirty artworks and interactive website.  Whitney Museum of American Art

The 78th instalment of the Whitney Biennial for 2017 - which always aims for the zeitgeist and the seminal - opens at a time of crisis not only in the United States, but around the world. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

David Ferrando Giraut: The Accursed Stare

David Ferrando Giraut, CATOPTROPHILIA, 2013. Installation view.

David Ferrando Giraut’s recent works weave a neon path through progressive economic theories and 17,000 years of image-making, arriving at the present day clad in Louboutin and dripping in gold. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Ort Gallery, 500-504 Moseley Road, Birmingham B12 9AH

Kristina Cranfeld: In This Perfect British Landscape…

Kristina Cranfeld: In This Perfect British Landscape... installation view at Ort Gallery, 2017

This tight and timely show from Kristina Cranfeld comprises two projected films, ‘Manufactured Britishness’ and ‘Dukes Rise’, both absurdist takes on the current immigration crisis and the nostalgic fantasy of resurrecting the Great British identity. Review by Elli Resvanis

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 10002

A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving

A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving, installation view at New Museum, New York, 2017

'Shabby but Thriving' at the New Museum is an installation, centred on a two-channel video, that extends A.K. Burns’ trans-feminist practice. Review by Rusty Van Riper

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Auto Italia, 44 Bonner Rd, London E2 9JS

Feral Kin

Feral Kin, Auto Italia South East (2017). Installation detail (left to right): Billy Howard Price, Taut Pupil (2017). Digital print. Jaakko Pallasvuo, MASK (2016) written by Huw Lemmey & Jaakko Pallasvuo. Single channel video.

‘Feral Kin’ is London’s first glimpse into Auto Italia’s collaborative, ongoing project ‘On Coping’. From Johannesburg to Copenhagen, Auto Italia has brought ‘On Coping’ across the world. Working locally with artists in each city, the project seeks to unpack the artist precariat by developing systems of growth through collaboration. Review by Ashley Janke

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BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Holly Hendry: Wrot

Holly Hendry: Wrot, installation view at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, 2017

It is no exaggeration to say there are many layers to Holly Hendry’s ‘Wrot,’ both literally and metaphorically. In her first major institutional exhibition, the emerging British artist presents an imaginative body of work that demonstrates her boldness and ingenuity. Review by Christopher Little

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Wysing Arts Centre, Fox Road, Bourn, Cambridge, CB23 2TX

All Channels Open

Lawrence Lek, FABRICK, 2017. Two video loops, 12 min, Stereo sound, Architectural model, Lasercut MDF, HD Screens, Raspberry Pis, LED Strip. 65 x 25 x 15 cm.

‘All Channels Open’ is similar to a compilation played within a subdued, minimally lit dance floor. An imaginable mic is passed to each artist in an effort to amplify her or his voice and position in the space. Review by Jaime Marie Davis

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Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1S 1BP

Tim Noble and Sue Webster: STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS

Tim Noble and Sue Webster, STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS, 2017, Installation view

Their exaggerated expressions, dishevelled hair and naked bodies rendered with a cartoonish aesthetic make an adequate mockery of the Mayfair surroundings. The artists are seemingly running riot in their white cube play-pen. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Thomas Dane Gallery 3 Duke Street St James's London SW1Y 6BN

Anya Gallaccio: Beautiful Minds

Anya Gallaccio, Beautiful Minds, 2017. Installation view, Thomas Dane Gallery, London

'Beautiful Minds’ at Thomas Dane Gallery presents a collaborative sculptural installation that interrogates notions of authorship, performativity and our relationship to technology. Review by Zoe Marden

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Ghislaine Leung: The Moves

Pictures, 2017, Ghislaine Leung. Raised floor with sunken recess, black rubber Push to Shove, 2017, Ghislaine Leung. Foam board, tape, carpet, rubber, phones, night lights, video, photos, paper, acetate, mirror, extension cables, cable ties. 61 x 112

The display overwhelms by its absence of images and presents instead a series of glass wall panels bracketed inside aluminium structures. These panels, covered with black vinyl texts, spell out incidental conversations, unsolicited quotes, traces of speech. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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