Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

Among the Trees

Jennifer Steinkamp, Blind Eye, 1, 2018, at Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery, 2020

Historically in western art, trees have generally been depicted as ornamental afterthoughts, their upright forms used to frame a scene or add definition to a landscape. ‘Among the Trees’ at Hayward Gallery, however, puts trees centre-stage, emphasising images where branches and leaves fill the frame, confusing the eye and defying the human scale of the viewfinder or canvas. Review by Anna Souter

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Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Masculinities: Liberation through Photography

Masculinities: Liberation through Photography, Installation view, Barbican Art Gallery

‘Masculinities: Liberation through Photography’ at the Barbican Centre is a masterful, comprehensive exhibition that outlines a sweeping artistic history that is probing, insightful and moving. Exploring how masculinity has been coded, performed, and socially constructed from the 1960s to the present day, this is a show of 50 international artists working through the medium of film and photography. Working across themes from queer identity, female perceptions of men, hypermasculine stereotypes, many of the participants don't sit easily within a gender binary, and rarely is the story told without an overlap to class, racism and the Western gaze; this is masculinity at its fullest. Review by Chris Hayes

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Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Alina Szapocznikow: To Exalt the Ephemeral

Autoportrait (Self-portrait), 1971, Plaster

Nearly fifty years after her death, the restlessly experimental oeuvre of Alina Szapocznikow remains unresolved work; a highly significant, even foundational, figure in the history of twentieth-century Polish art, yet her legacy remains elusive to an audience that may be encountering her for the first time. Sitting uneasily between Surrealism, Nouveau Réalisme and Pop Art, her provocative body of work shifted considerably from a classical figurative manner to one more impermanent, sexualised and haunting. Review by Matthew Cheale

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narrative projects, 110 New Cavendish Street, Fitzrovia, London W1W 6XR

Rachel Lowe: SPLIT

Rachel Lowe, Split, 2020, 4 channel video projection, sound

Eighty black and white slides, created from found photographs of assorted different women, are projected chronologically so as to suggest the life of one individual woman. Having removed the central section, where the female subject should be, from each photograph, the re-assembled images now possess a vertical seam running down their centres. The physical incision enacted upon the images does not remove the woman's presence entirely, leaving the fictional "Elizabeth" of the title, somehow present and absent at the same time. Find out more about Rachel Lowe: SPLIT at narrative projects.

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15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival, TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and other venues

Myths Of the Near Future

Ann Lislegaard, Installation View ENTANGLEMENT, TEA Tenerife

‘Myths of the Near Future’ was the chosen theme and title of the 15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival directed by Laura Vallés and held at TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and various other art venues in the Canary Islands. From the outset, the ambition was to reach out beyond the confines of photography in order to rethink the theory of the image and its limits, the places where it rubs up against other disciplines of knowledge like philosophy, sociology and anthropology. Review by Néstor Delgado Morales

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Stills: Centre for Photography, 23 Cockburn Street, Edinburgh, Scotland EH1 1BP

Women Photographers from The AmberSide Collection

Women Photographers from The AmberSide Collection at Stills: Centre for Photography.

This exhibition brings together works from The AmberSide Collection, works made and gathered by a collective originally born in London over 50 years ago and based in Newcastle since the late 1970s. Since then, the group has charted documentary photography in the United Kingdom and further afield, through their own photography or through work acquired, with a focus on images highlighting socio-political situations. These range from depicting the council estates of the North East to wider global scenes, always from a left leaning stance. Review by Nicola Jeffs

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Castor Projects, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Habitual

Installation view

Entering the gallery through the small front door, the audience is directed towards the exhibition through a segue into a seemingly empty, light grey space with a lonesome bench and a large wooden structure in the corner. At this point there is still no sign of any art in an exhibition of 19 artists. However, instead of a conventional commercial group exhibition, ‘Habitual’ unfolds within the theatrical setting of a compulsive collector’s storage solution. Review by Sonja Teszler

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Kettle's Yard, Castle St, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Linderism

Glorification de l'Elue

Beyond the punk façade of the artist known just as ‘Linder’, there is an intricate weaver of narratives and miner of myths to be found. Kettle’s Yard’s sensory and expansive retrospective makes this apparent. Review by Clare Robson

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Dora Maar

Dora Maar at Tate Modern, 2019.

Tate Modern here highlights how vast, rich and varied Maar’s work was, over five decades, in striking curatorial choices. It powerfully repairs an injustice in the history of art. Moving chronologically from her first photographs to her experimental return to the dark room, the exhibition displays different phases of a sublime career, kick-started in an iconic place and time: Paris in the 1930s within the Surrealist movement. Review by Melissa Chemam

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Jerwood Arts,171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/Photoworks Awards

Silvia Rosi, Jerwood/Photoworks Awards 2020 supported by Jerwood Arts and Photoworks. Installation view at Jerwood Space, London.

The Jerwood/Photoworks Awards is a significant opportunity for an early career artist to develop their work over the course of a year with the benefit of financial support and a program of mentoring. The 2020 winners are Silvia Rosi and Theo Simpson and their commissioned work is currently on view at Jerwood Arts. The award boasts its effort to encourage artists who engage with photography in an experimental way. Review by Katie McCain

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LOOCK Galerie, Potsdamer Strasse 63, DE 10785 Berlin

Christian Borchert: Familienporträts

Familienporträts by Christian Borchert at Loock, Berlin

Christian’s Borchert’s ‘Familienporträts’ pull the viewer in off the cold West Berlin street, into a position of a post-Cold War voyeur; peering into the domestic situations of individual families who lived through the DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik) and then what became of them after. Review by Nicola Jeffs

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Museum of Cycladic Art, Neofitou Douka 4, Athens 106 74, Greece

Lynda Benglis: In the Realm of the Senses, Presented by NEON

Lynda Benglis: In the Realm of the Senses, Installation view copyright Panos Kokkinias Courtesy NEON

I’ve never seen Lynda Benglis’s work look more relevant than scattered around an opulent Neo-Classical mansion in the shadow of the Acropolis. The Stathatos Mansion is a slave to taste and style, determinedly emulating the great villas of the past, and Benglis’s sculpture is its total opposite. It’s bold, it’s bombastic, even vulgar at times, and unlike Neo-Classicism, never conventional, not even for a second. Review by William Summerfield

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PhotoAccess, New South Wales Cres, Griffith ACT 2603, Australia

Now You See Me: Visualising the Surveillance State

Marcus DeSieno, 48.294685, -113.241478 from No Man's Land - Views from a Surveillance State, 2018, inkjet print, 81 cm x 101 cm

Smile. Chances are you’re on camera. ‘Now You See Me: Visualising the Surveillance State’ provides an incisive exploration of the ubiquity of surveillance technologies; referencing strategies of observation and power from the 18th century and illustrating their intensified application in our modern world. Underpinning the exhibition, curated by Ashley Lumb with assistance by Kate Matthews, is a structuring dichotomy of visibility and invisibility, with the influence of the Panopticon – an architectural fixture designed by Jeremey Bentham in 1785 for use in prisons – looming large over the history of modern surveillance. Review by Daniel Pateman

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180 The Strand, London, WC2R 1EA

Transformer: A Rebirth of Wonder

Korakrit Arunanondchai, Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3, 2015

The space below 180 The Strand feels labyrinthine and immersive – shuffling through the exhibition, there is no real sense of where anything is in relation to anything else. The works occur sequentially, with no overlap between worlds and no deviation from this path. A varied approach to texture, sound, and scent add to the feeling of discrete worlds, as does the lighting, with rooms ranging from almost totally dark or U.V. for Chen’s photographs to the stark, blindingly white light as in Huanca’s installation, or the blue neon strip lighting that extends from the virtual reality of the screen into the space itself in Lek’s work. Review by Katie McCain

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