Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Lane Meyer Projects, 2528 Walnut Street, Denver, CO 80205, USA

Green Gra$$

Dionne Lee, Breaking the Fall, 2016, (Diptych), archival inkjet print

The exhibition title alludes to the ways in which capitalism has become intertwined with a looming sense of environmental disaster in the age of the Anthropocene. Through collage, installation and sculpture, ‘Green Gra$$’ examines our cultural longing for a future that is already lost. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstraße 7, 10963 Berlin

The Garden of Earthly Delights

Homo sapiens sapiens

Taking its point of departure and title from Hieronymus Bosch’s ‘Garden of Earthly Delights’ (1490-1510), the current exhibition at Gropius Bau brings together the wide-ranging work of twenty international artists. The state of the garden serves as a microcosmic starting point, from which expansive ideas and wider dialogues emerge about colonialism, systems of sharing, borders and structures of thought. With contributing artists including Yayoi Kusama, Pipilotti Rist, Hicham Berrada and more, the exhibition moves from the paradisiacal to the provocative, the reflective to the revolutionary, and shifts between global and individual lenses. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St, Denver, CO 80202, United States

Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation

Francesca Woodman, Portrait of a Reputation, installation view, MCA Denver

‘Portrait of a Reputation’ at the Museum of Contemporary Art highlights the body’s exceptional ability to make connections with the world. The body acts as a mediator between the self and our environment allowing us to move, to create bonds, to express our feelings, and most importantly, to experience the world. Viewers are allowed to create an experience for themselves through their presence, while simultaneously experiencing the past life of artist, Francesca Woodman. Review by Kandice Cleveland

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Huis Marseille, Keizersgracht 401, 1016 EK Amsterdam, Netherlands

Deana Lawson

Ring Bearer, 2016

Large-scale portraits are sparsely hung throughout lofty rooms with white panelling, accompanied by unframed snapshots and Polaroids. The latter are stuck into the portrait’s frames while the former cluster into corners like living organisms; a sprawling archive of intimate yet anonymous faces. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Auguststraße 69, 10117 Berlin, Germany

Schering Stiftung Art Award 2018: Anna Daučíková

Upbringing by Touch

The current exhibition at KW Institute presents the work of Anna Daučíková through video, photography and sculpture. Spanning the past five decades, the body of work refuses linearity, welcomes the experimental possibilities between the artist and her materials, and opens up to wider discourses on identity. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Anna-Sophie Berger: A Failed Play

A Failed Play, Installation View, 2019, Anna-Sophie Berger

It is fitting that the accompanying exhibition text for ‘A Failed Play’, written by Anna Sophie-Berger herself, opens with a story that leaves out the play entirely. The focus is on everything but - Beckett’s declaration of it as a failure, his begrudging agreement to translate it for publication in English, and the fight that ensued over copyright following his death. Review by India Nielsen

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1F 9DY

Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

Installation View of Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

‘Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium’ presents an extensive exhibition by the late American artist and writer Allan Sekula (1951-2013). While the title aims to highlight the medium’s aporias, the show extends across photography, performance, text, and video, contrasting photography’s material mediations with its claim to realism. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham, NG1 2GB

Elizabeth Price: FELT TIP

Elizabeth Price, KOHL (still), 2018

Elizabeth Price’s solo show at Nottingham Contemporary brings together three new works. Each departs from a moment in late 20th century British history: a period marked by the collapse of the organized Left, the systematic dismantling of union power, and the programmatic reconstitution of the working class. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Kadist, 19bis/21 rue des Trois Frères, Paris, 75018, France

Affective Utopia

Reynier Leyva Novo, A Thousand and One Times Revolution, 2009-2018, exhibition view Affective Utopia, KADIST, Paris.

Imagining utopia seems to have become the principal task of artists as of late, any speculative, social practice is quickly branded as such. So much so that the title of Kadist’s latest exhibition ‘Affective Utopia’ almost washes past unnoticed. Review by Jessica Saxby

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tracey Emin A Fortnight of Tears

Tracey Emin, A Fortnight of Tears, White Cube Bermondsey, 6 February - 7 April 2019

The paintings in this exhibition splatter the flesh, blood and mucus palettes of Francis Bacon and Cy Twombly across Egon Schiele’s warped technical accuracy of human anatomy. It’s some of the best painting Emin has done for years and is enough to carry the less potent parts of the exhibition. The neon and the selfies seem to blare some loud but ineloquent kind of intimacy at you, and don’t come near the compositional mastery of the paintings and sculptures. Review by Adam Heardman

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Eastside Projects, 86 Heath Mill Lane, Birmingham, B9 4AR

The Range

Eastside Projects, The Range, 2018, Photo: Stuart Whipps

Curated by artist Rehana Zaman, ‘The Range’ features new work by six artists, including Ain Bailey, Adam Farah and Beverley Bennett, following close to a year of mostly digital correspondence amongst the group. Internet culture provides much of the source material for their shared exploration and humour, as well as the show’s title, which makes reference to a ‘Little Britain’ sketch and the popular Twitter thread it inspired. Review by Divya Osbon

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Nederlands Fotomuseum, Gebouw Las Palmas, Wilhelminakade 332, 3072 AR Rotterdam

Rein Jelle Terpstra: Robert F. Kennedy Funeral Train – The People’s View

Copyright William F. Wisnom Sr, Tullytown (PA), 8 June 1968, from Rein Jelle Terpstra, The People's View (2014-2018)

Rein Jelle Terpstra’s ‘The People’s View’ looks back at one of 1968’s most memorable moments to gather Americans together in disbelief: the funeral train of Democratic Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy, which travelled from New York City to Washington DC, on 8 June 1968. Review by Nicola Jeffs

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Libita Clayton: Quantum Ghost

Libita Clayton, Quantum Ghost, 2019. Installation view.

For Libita Clayton’s first UK solo show the artist presents ‘Quantum Ghost’, an interlinked two-part encounter with the politics inherent to her familial heritage and the journey it took to give agency to its legacy. Review by Sophie Risner

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Ghislaine Leung: CONSTITUTION

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery evades concise summation. Description becomes easily lost in particularities, or overlooks specific works altogether. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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