Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Estonia Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, San Samuele Square, San Marco 3199, 2nd floor, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2017: Katja Novitskova: If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes

Katja Novitskova, If Only You Could See What I've Seen with Your Eyes, exhibition view at the Estonian Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, 57th Venice Bienniale

Outside the entrance of the Estonian Pavilion in the 57th Venice Biennale, the phrase ‘If only you could see what I’ve seen with your eyes’ is printed on a poster in glowing red type. Katja Novitskova’s exhibition title originates from the 1982 post-apocalyptic film ‘Blade Runner’ and points toward several themes that run throughout the exhibition. Review by Ashley Janke

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Klein Sun Gallery, 525 W 22nd St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Ji Zhou: Real Illusion

Ji Zhou, Greenhouse 2, 2017, archival pigment print, 110 x 250 cm

Moving between imagined and inhabited geographies, the artist suggests that our grasp on the tangible world is a tendentious fiction. Review by Tausif Noor

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Victoria Miro Gallery, 16 Wharf Road, London N1 7RW

Isaac Julien: “I dream a world” Looking for Langston

Installation view, Isaac Julien: "I dream a world" Looking for Langston

Julien’s visually arresting installation is luminous and large-scale, a combination of text, documentation and photography. Most notable are the sizeable prints of well-dressed, handsome characters from his film. However, to stop at that would mean to miss the self-determinism of his subject and process. Review by Joan Lee

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Copperfield Gallery, 6 Copperfield Street London SE1 0EP

We have the weights, we have the measures

Installation view, We have the weigts, we have the measures at Copperfield, London.

Territories envisioned and established on someone else’s behalf and their symbolic manifestations in the everyday are the driving force behind this show. This draws upon the political manoeuvres performed by any form of power in order to claim geography. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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Annka Kultys Gallery, 472 Hackney Rd, Unit 3, 1st Floor, London E2 9EQ

Signe Pierce: Faux Realities

Installation view 2017, Signe Pierce, Annka Kultys

“This is where it all started,” Signe Pierce points toward a lone print of a silhouetted palm tree that has somehow managed to wrangle free from the infinite scroll of neon-soaked imagery expanding across the walls of Annka Kultys Gallery for her ‘Faux Realities’ exhibition. Review by Alice Bucknell

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ALMA ZEVI, Salizzada San Samuele, 3357, 30124 Venice, Italy

John Smith: Films in Sheep’s Clothing

John Smith, Films in Sheep's Clothing, Om, 1986, ALMA ZEVI, 2017

In an increasingly earnest art world, visitors to Alma Zevi’s gallery off the main sway of the Grand Canal can take relief in the comedic value of mistranslation and mistaken identity. John Smith’s films - showcased for the first time in Italy in Zevi’s solo exhibition – are arranged into an artful, tightly curated presentation, and span Smith’s forty-year involvement at the frontline of British conceptual film-making. Review by Olivia Paterson

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Hales Gallery, Tea Building, 7 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA

Carolee Schneemann: More Wrong Things

Carolee Schneemann, More Wrong Things, 2017, Hales London

Recently awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Carolee Schneemann is best known for her innovations in feminist and performance art. Yet Schneemann’s decades-spanning multimedia practice has also consistently questioned the personal and cultural politics of violence and mourning, which the eloquent recent works in the exhibition continue to examine. Review by Carlos Kong

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VITRINE, London, 15 Bermondsey Square, London SE1 3UN

Kate Cooper: Ways to Scale

Kate Cooper, Ways to Scale, Installation View 2017

The narrative aspect of the image is ambiguous, with much of what’s happening not revealed by the framing, but nonetheless we can find a young red-haired woman dressed in pristine white to match the white medical environment, some unidentified tech and the tendrils of a jellyfish. Tessa Norton reviews

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

You Are Looking At Something That Never Occurred

You Are Looking at Something That Never Occurred, 2017. Installation view at Zabludowicz Collection.

With a title taken from an interview with Jeff Wall by Lucas Blalock, ‘You are Looking at Something that Never Occurred' is yet another attempt aiming to challenge the idea that photography identifies with reality and objectivity. Review by Aris Kourkoumelis

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Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Mat Collishaw: Thresholds

Thresholds, early test visualisation

In the context of Photo London, the artist has brought together the vanguard of Victorian visual technology with current developments in virtual reality programming. Review by Cleo Roberts

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White Rainbow,47 Mortimer St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8HJ

Minimalist Anyway | Kazuko Miyamoto and Lydia Okumura

Minimalist Anyway, Installation view at White Rainbow, London, 2017.

‘Minimalist Anyway’ held at White Rainbow presents a dialogue between the works of two artists with Japanese origins: Lydia Okumura and Kazuko Miyamoto, considering how the legacy of minimalism has impacted upon the reading of their work. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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Hannah Barry Gallery, 4 Holly Grove, Peckham, London SE15 5DF

Oliver Griffin

H Demonstrations of Patterns in Flow What do you expect from your surfaces. A philosophy of Bicycle MotoCross (BMX) and everything. Installation view.

On the wall, hung off-centre in a 3 x 3 grid that recalls the conventional arrangement of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s water towers and grain elevators, are nine risograph prints. They belong to a series of photographs taken by Griffin at a flatland BMX competition in 2015, not of the riders or their performances, but of the streaks whorled by skidding tyres. Review by Kit Webb

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