Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

The Sunday Painter, 1st Floor, 12-16 Blenheim Grove, London SE15 4QL

Assorted Paper

Installation view, Assorted Paper, The Sunday Painter

The gallery plays host to a number of works, all wrestling with different aspects of the material, and manages to arrange them in a way that provokes dialogue between the works without it being overwhelming. There is a mixture of surprising and expected responses to working with paper. Review by Jesc Bunyard

Further reading +

Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945. Installation View, Barbican Art Gallery, London, 23 March - 25 June 2017

This is an exhibition that, alongside showing ground breaking architectural designs and their socio-economical contexts, attempts to dig deeper into the psyche of the Japanese family. Spread across two floors centred around a courtyard with lovingly reconstructed walk-through models of contemporary Japanese rooms, the show allows us to sense what it’s like to live in these finest examples of nanotecture. Review by Dominika Mackiewicz

Further reading +

The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man, installation view at The Power Plant, Toronto, 2017

In his solo exhibition at the Power Plant, Jonathas de Andrade astutely mines the racialized socio-economic conditions specific to north-eastern Brazil in order to explore the ways in which archetypes, ideologies and fictions both conceal and construct lived experience. Review by Alex Borkowski

Further reading +

Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Whitney Biennial 2017

Installation Occupy Museums,  Debtfair, 2017  ( 2017 Whitney Biennial, March 17—June 11, 2017).  Thirty artworks and interactive website.  Whitney Museum of American Art

The 78th instalment of the Whitney Biennial for 2017 - which always aims for the zeitgeist and the seminal - opens at a time of crisis not only in the United States, but around the world. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

Further reading +

Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Richard Mosse: Incoming

Still frame from Incoming, 2015-2016. Three screen video installation by Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost.

In ‘Incoming’, the other is played by the European state apparatus. In their helmets, suits and protective gear, those that meet and interact with the refugees are rendered alien in the thermographic camera’s aesthetic. Mosse’s camera is able to present the true inhumanity of the crisis by inverting the roles of the migrant and those enforcing the violent borders. Review by David Lee Astley

Further reading +

The RYDER, 19a Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Ewa Axelrad: SATIS

Ewa Axelrad: SATIS, Installation view at The RYDER Projects, London, 9 March - 15 April 2017

It’s difficult not to flinch when the word ‘satis’ ricochets through the sober silence of Ewa Axelrad’s exhibition at The RYDER, even after you have heard it for the first time. This sonic intrusion continues to hang in the air as much as it cuts through it with a repeating interval. Review by Joseph Constable

Further reading +

Decad, Gneisenaustraße 52, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Christopher Petit: In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone

Christopher Petit: In What's Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone, installation view at Decad, 201

Novelist and filmmaker Christopher Petit presents ‘In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone’. Using a pixelated image of the late David Bowie as a stimulus, the four works presented are an examination of a quiet voyeurism that speaks to internal, often inexpressible observations surrounding popular, repetitive images. Review by Candice Nembhard

Further reading +

The Third Line, Warehouse 78 & 80, Street 8, Al Quoz 1, Alserkal Avenue Dubai, UAE

Sophia Al-Maria: EVERYTHING MUST GO

Sophia Al-Maria EVERYTHING MUST GO, installation view at The Third Line, Dubai 2017. Courtesy the artist and The Third Line.

Sophia Al-Maria's exhibition at The Third Line creates an immersive experience, capturing the chaotic, almost apocalyptic act of consuming. The viewer is invited to experience illusions of order in underlying confusion and pandemonium.

Further reading +

Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square, Bloomsbury, London WC1N 1AZ

Mark Neville: Child’s Play

Mark Neville, Arts and Crafts at Somerford Grove Adventure Playground, 2011

The Foundling Museum’s 'Child’s Play' by Mark Neville is a photography exhibition which inhabits that grey, often elusive space between contemporary art, documentary photography and political activism. The project aims to focus attention on attitudes towards play in the UK by bringing together a book, a symposium and this exhibition which presents images of children playing set against a number of vastly contrasting backdrops around the world. Review by Alexander Daniel

Further reading +

Centre for Contemporary Arts, 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

Forms of Action

Asuncion Molinos Gordo, Contestador (Answerphone), 2016, installation view at Forms of Action, CCA Glasgow

‘Forms of Action’ presents the work of seven artists whose actions in society are the core of their practice. Each with rich cultural, historical and political backdrops, this assembly of artists is, in itself, a timely form of action. Review by Kate Self.

Further reading +