Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

William Benington Gallery, Unit 3, 50 Tower Bridge Road, London, SE1 4TR and Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Amy Stephens: Land | Reland

Hood trail

Each work across both shows and throughout Stephens’ practice exists as part of an interlinking chain. She continually returns to and reuses ideas, allowing them to land and re-land, resisting the ossifying force of finitude and following the fluidity of nature’s endless cycles. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Messums Wiltshire, Place Farm, Court St, Tisbury, Salisbury SP3 6LW

IMAGE

BREAKFAST

While the focus here is on portrait and documentary photography, the works in the barn present a rupture to a historically male-dominated practice. Contemporary works by artists such as Juno Calypso and Maisie Cousins, typified by vivid colours, theatrical staging and a disciplined control of the viewer’s gaze, challenge a legacy of image-making that has often elided female experience; highlighting the constructed nature of photography rather than offering it as guarantor of truth. Review by Daniel Pateman

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Berlinische Gallerie, Alte Jakobstraße 124–128 10969, Berlin, Germany

Loredana Nemes: Greed Fear Love

Loredana Nemes. Serie Ocna. Eine Annaherung, 2017

Photographer Loredana Nemes takes the big stage in Berlinische Galerie, where her 120 works are shown under the title ‘Greed Fear Love’. Her photography, from between 2010 and 2018, is accompanied by lyrical poems. Review by Gulnaz Can

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Michael Jackson: On the Wall

Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II (Michael Jackson)

The religious aspects of the exhibition are divided. Some works stand as testament to Jackson’s enigmatic international appeal. One room contains footage from the 1992 Dangerous world tour, revealing delirious crowds, a mass euphoria even outstripping Beatlemania: while the Fab Four played to 55,000 people at Shea Stadium in 1965, Jackson’s concert in Bucharest is estimated to have been attended by nearly 100,000. And the numbers don’t stop there: more than 1,000,000 fans are said to have congregated outside Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, while the televised spectacle itself is said to have been watched by more than 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. “We’re more popular than Jesus,” said Lennon of the Beatles in 1966. One wonders where this places Jackson. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Paradise Works, East Philip Street, Salford, Manchester, M3 7LE

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs installation view

Alongside his artistic practice, Nick Jordan has spent a number of years filming mental health training videos for the University of Manchester’s hospital teaching unit, encountering many cases of ‘disorder’ as a result. This latest body of work, presented at Paradise Works, on the border between Manchester and Salford, responds to one kind of psychosis in particular: a manifestation of schizophrenia known as ‘thought broadcasting’, whereby patients believe that their thoughts are being transmitted and heard by others. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Edel Assanti, 74A Newman St, Fitzrovia, London W1T 3DB

Noémie Goudal: Telluris

Noemie Goudal: Telluris installation view

Noémie Goudal’s photographs are full of unsettled contradiction. The product of constructions, they lie between truth and fiction, the ancient and the new, managing to be both unified and fragmented, existing in a state of instability. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford, England

America’s Cool Modernism

Le Tournesol (The Sunflower)

Above all, in America’s Cool Modernism at the Ashmolean Museum, the absence of human presence in the artworks betrays an anxiety towards the place of people in an increasingly mechanised world. I found myself thinking about the photographs of Detroit that surfaced several years ago, showing the derelict buildings and factories that remain in the wake of the city’s bankruptcy. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Charlemont House, Parnell Square North, Dublin 1, D01 F2X9, Ireland

Amanda Dunsmore: Keeper

Amanda Dunsmore, John Hume, 2005; installation view, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

In light of seismic political events, and the failed attempts to square the circle that is the Irish Border, Amanda Dunsmore’s exhibition ‘Keeper’ in Dublin’s Hugh Lane seems increasingly vital and brings the Good Friday Agreement into sharper focus. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Castlefield Gallery, 2 Hewitt Street Manchester, M15 4GB

Ruth Barker & Hannah Leighton-Boyce

Ruth Barker, Victory, 2013, Her whole self, 2018

Set against the backdrop of the centenary celebrations of the suffragette movement, Castlefield Gallery's exhibition – which is co-commissioned with the University of Salford Art Collection – is the result of Ruth Barker and Hannah Leighton-Boyce's year-long research and production residencies. Throughout 2017, the two artists exchanged ideas from their respective locations in Salford and Glasgow; each delving into the long-standing archives of either the University of Salford Art Collection or the Glasgow Women's Library in order to formulate new visual narratives. Review by Selina Oakes

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Huxley-Parlour, 3-5 Swallow St, Mayfair, London W1B 4DE

Jocelyn Lee: The Appearance of Things

The Bath

It would be hard for anyone, man or woman, to walk into the Jocelyn Lee’s exhibition at Huxley-Parlour and not feel surrounded by the regenerative power of nature and its symbiotic connection to the female body. Of course, these themes have walked hand-in-hand since the earliest forms of visual art, but Lee manages to shed a new light on this age-old allegory in her photography by capturing the physical world in all its transience and fragility. Review by Kristina Foster

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Exeter Phoenix, Gandy St, Exeter EX4 3LS

Young In Hong: The Moon’s Trick

Detail of Burning with Triadic Harmony

In South Korean artist Young In Hong’s solo exhibition at the Exeter Phoenix, The Moon’s Trick, themes of censorship, authorship, and reinterpretation with a focus on Korea’s own cultural and historical struggle with similar issues are explored. Named after a Soo-Young Kim poem, Hong’s exhibition refers to the vortex created by a spinning top which poet Kim once watched and felt let him exist in a different sphere from our world and gave him a new level of perception. Review by James McColl

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Langlands & Bell: Internet Giants: Masters of the Universe

Icon (Mark Zuckerberg)

Internet Giants: Masters of the Universe at Birmingham's Ikon Gallery is a timely mediation on how dominant technology behemoths, like Facebook, have completely reshaped our cultural and social landscape. Teasing out these complexities through new sculptural and digital works, artists Langlands & Bell question if the opulent mega campuses of Apple and Google will define our age. Review by Jack Welsh

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KARST Gallery, 22 George Pl, Plymouth PL1 3NY

Assembled Spaces

Assembled Spaces at KARST Gallery, 2018 installation view

Assembled Spaces brings together the work of Tine Bay Lührssen, Nina Brauhauser and Ilka Helmig in their UK debut. The artist trio combine photography, sculpture and traditional and digital drawing with a considered harmony in the arrangement of the works. They zigzag between each other, creating a visual conversation which dictates no linear instructions, nor a start or end point, to the viewer’s navigation. Review by Eva Szwarc

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