Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Whitney Biennial 2017

Installation Occupy Museums,  Debtfair, 2017  ( 2017 Whitney Biennial, March 17—June 11, 2017).  Thirty artworks and interactive website.  Whitney Museum of American Art

The 78th instalment of the Whitney Biennial for 2017 - which always aims for the zeitgeist and the seminal - opens at a time of crisis not only in the United States, but around the world. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Richard Mosse: Incoming

Still frame from Incoming, 2015-2016. Three screen video installation by Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost.

In ‘Incoming’, the other is played by the European state apparatus. In their helmets, suits and protective gear, those that meet and interact with the refugees are rendered alien in the thermographic camera’s aesthetic. Mosse’s camera is able to present the true inhumanity of the crisis by inverting the roles of the migrant and those enforcing the violent borders. Review by David Lee Astley

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The RYDER, 19a Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Ewa Axelrad: SATIS

Ewa Axelrad: SATIS, Installation view at The RYDER Projects, London, 9 March - 15 April 2017

It’s difficult not to flinch when the word ‘satis’ ricochets through the sober silence of Ewa Axelrad’s exhibition at The RYDER, even after you have heard it for the first time. This sonic intrusion continues to hang in the air as much as it cuts through it with a repeating interval. Review by Joseph Constable

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Decad, Gneisenaustraße 52, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Christopher Petit: In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone

Christopher Petit: In What's Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone, installation view at Decad, 201

Novelist and filmmaker Christopher Petit presents ‘In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone’. Using a pixelated image of the late David Bowie as a stimulus, the four works presented are an examination of a quiet voyeurism that speaks to internal, often inexpressible observations surrounding popular, repetitive images. Review by Candice Nembhard

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The Third Line, Warehouse 78 & 80, Street 8, Al Quoz 1, Alserkal Avenue Dubai, UAE

Sophia Al-Maria: EVERYTHING MUST GO

Sophia Al-Maria EVERYTHING MUST GO, installation view at The Third Line, Dubai 2017. Courtesy the artist and The Third Line.

Sophia Al-Maria's exhibition at The Third Line creates an immersive experience, capturing the chaotic, almost apocalyptic act of consuming. The viewer is invited to experience illusions of order in underlying confusion and pandemonium.

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Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square, Bloomsbury, London WC1N 1AZ

Mark Neville: Child’s Play

Mark Neville, Arts and Crafts at Somerford Grove Adventure Playground, 2011

The Foundling Museum’s 'Child’s Play' by Mark Neville is a photography exhibition which inhabits that grey, often elusive space between contemporary art, documentary photography and political activism. The project aims to focus attention on attitudes towards play in the UK by bringing together a book, a symposium and this exhibition which presents images of children playing set against a number of vastly contrasting backdrops around the world. Review by Alexander Daniel

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Centre for Contemporary Arts, 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

Forms of Action

Asuncion Molinos Gordo, Contestador (Answerphone), 2016, installation view at Forms of Action, CCA Glasgow

‘Forms of Action’ presents the work of seven artists whose actions in society are the core of their practice. Each with rich cultural, historical and political backdrops, this assembly of artists is, in itself, a timely form of action. Review by Kate Self.

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Amie Siegel: Strata

Amie Siegel, Quarry, 2015. HD video, colour and sound. Exhibition view South London Gallery, 2017

Siegel probes ideas of value, wealth, attraction and symbolism through her work, presenting a layering of geological and allegorical strata which gives the exhibition its title. Review by Jillian Knipe

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SpazioA, Via Amati, 13 Pistoia 51100 Italy

Ode de Kort: O froooom O toooo O

Ode de Kort, 'O froooom O toooo O', 2017, exhibition view, SpazioA, Pistoia

For her first solo show Belgian artist Ode de Kort presents a new body of work comprising photographic, typographic and choreographic objects, exploring tensions between stasis and movement, and challenging the boundaries between media and disciplines.

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The Showroom, 63 Penfold Street, London NW8 8PQ

Laura Oldfield Ford: Alpha/Isis/Eden

Laura Oldfield Ford, Alpha/Isis/Eden, installation view, The Showroom, 2017

Her omnipresence comes from a series of movements through the landscape as a squatter and activist. It is through Oldfield Ford’s political ideologies that the thematic of resistance in her work surfaces. Review by Sophie Risner

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IMT Gallery, 2, 210 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9NQ

you were high when I was doomed

Installation view, you were high when I was doomed, IMT Gallery

The walls of the gallery have been spray painted to resemble some kind of toxic sky, with poisonous greens and billowing hues of black and purple. It creates a trail of changing colours like some kind of Romantic painter’s nightmare, through to its charred end. Review by Theo Turpin

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Passen-gers, Brunswick Centre, London

Evy Jokhova: Towering in the condition of fragments

Installation view, l-r: Totem VIII, 2017, plaster, steel, cement, polystyrene, stone effect; Slabs on Stone II, 2016, carved stone, linoleum, oil paint, stone effect, timber; Slabs on Stone I, 2016; Totem I, 2016

Evy Jokhova’s exhibition consists of a mix of sculptures and installations that generate questions about nature and artifice, crafted and found objects, and subjective and objective states. Stacked in formations that resemble cairns, the works explore the social and historical dimensions of stone, linoleum, paint and fur. Review by Anya Smirnova

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