Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Annka Kultys Gallery, 472 Hackney Rd, Unit 3, 1st Floor, London E2 9EQ

Signe Pierce: Faux Realities

Installation view 2017, Signe Pierce, Annka Kultys

“This is where it all started,” Signe Pierce points toward a lone print of a silhouetted palm tree that has somehow managed to wrangle free from the infinite scroll of neon-soaked imagery expanding across the walls of Annka Kultys Gallery for her ‘Faux Realities’ exhibition. Review by Alice Bucknell

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ALMA ZEVI, Salizzada San Samuele, 3357, 30124 Venice, Italy

John Smith: Films in Sheep’s Clothing

John Smith, Films in Sheep's Clothing, Om, 1986, ALMA ZEVI, 2017

In an increasingly earnest art world, visitors to Alma Zevi’s gallery off the main sway of the Grand Canal can take relief in the comedic value of mistranslation and mistaken identity. John Smith’s films - showcased for the first time in Italy in Zevi’s solo exhibition – are arranged into an artful, tightly curated presentation, and span Smith’s forty-year involvement at the frontline of British conceptual film-making. Review by Olivia Paterson

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Hales Gallery, Tea Building, 7 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA

Carolee Schneemann: More Wrong Things

Carolee Schneemann, More Wrong Things, 2017, Hales London

Recently awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Carolee Schneemann is best known for her innovations in feminist and performance art. Yet Schneemann’s decades-spanning multimedia practice has also consistently questioned the personal and cultural politics of violence and mourning, which the eloquent recent works in the exhibition continue to examine. Review by Carlos Kong

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VITRINE, London, 15 Bermondsey Square, London SE1 3UN

Kate Cooper: Ways to Scale

Kate Cooper, Ways to Scale, Installation View 2017

The narrative aspect of the image is ambiguous, with much of what’s happening not revealed by the framing, but nonetheless we can find a young red-haired woman dressed in pristine white to match the white medical environment, some unidentified tech and the tendrils of a jellyfish. Tessa Norton reviews

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

You Are Looking At Something That Never Occurred

You Are Looking at Something That Never Occurred, 2017. Installation view at Zabludowicz Collection.

With a title taken from an interview with Jeff Wall by Lucas Blalock, ‘You are Looking at Something that Never Occurred' is yet another attempt aiming to challenge the idea that photography identifies with reality and objectivity. Review by Aris Kourkoumelis

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Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Mat Collishaw: Thresholds

Thresholds, early test visualisation

In the context of Photo London, the artist has brought together the vanguard of Victorian visual technology with current developments in virtual reality programming. Review by Cleo Roberts

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White Rainbow,47 Mortimer St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8HJ

Minimalist Anyway | Kazuko Miyamoto and Lydia Okumura

Minimalist Anyway, Installation view at White Rainbow, London, 2017.

‘Minimalist Anyway’ held at White Rainbow presents a dialogue between the works of two artists with Japanese origins: Lydia Okumura and Kazuko Miyamoto, considering how the legacy of minimalism has impacted upon the reading of their work. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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Hannah Barry Gallery, 4 Holly Grove, Peckham, London SE15 5DF

Oliver Griffin

H Demonstrations of Patterns in Flow What do you expect from your surfaces. A philosophy of Bicycle MotoCross (BMX) and everything. Installation view.

On the wall, hung off-centre in a 3 x 3 grid that recalls the conventional arrangement of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s water towers and grain elevators, are nine risograph prints. They belong to a series of photographs taken by Griffin at a flatland BMX competition in 2015, not of the riders or their performances, but of the streaks whorled by skidding tyres. Review by Kit Webb

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AirSpace Gallery, 4 Broad Street, City Centre, Stoke-on-Trent ST1 4HL

Victoria Lucas: Lay of the Land (and other such myths)

Victoria Lucas, Lay of the Land (and other such myths), installation view at AirSpace Gallery

The spectral colours of ‘Psychedelic Western #3’ (2015) provide a rich exhibition excerpt – its vibrant and effervescent depictions of the Alabama hills are repeated in the show's wall-sized prints and theatrical screens. A feminine sigh welcomes you into the space, while deceptively light boulders – made from layers of polystyrene, fibreglass and jesmonite – catch your eye as they glisten under the gallery's spotlights. Selina Oakes reviews

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The Sunday Painter, 1st Floor, 12-16 Blenheim Grove, London SE15 4QL

Assorted Paper

Installation view, Assorted Paper, The Sunday Painter

The gallery plays host to a number of works, all wrestling with different aspects of the material, and manages to arrange them in a way that provokes dialogue between the works without it being overwhelming. There is a mixture of surprising and expected responses to working with paper. Review by Jesc Bunyard

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945. Installation View, Barbican Art Gallery, London, 23 March - 25 June 2017

This is an exhibition that, alongside showing ground breaking architectural designs and their socio-economical contexts, attempts to dig deeper into the psyche of the Japanese family. Spread across two floors centred around a courtyard with lovingly reconstructed walk-through models of contemporary Japanese rooms, the show allows us to sense what it’s like to live in these finest examples of nanotecture. Review by Dominika Mackiewicz

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man

Jonathas de Andrade: On Fishes, Horses and Man, installation view at The Power Plant, Toronto, 2017

In his solo exhibition at the Power Plant, Jonathas de Andrade astutely mines the racialized socio-economic conditions specific to north-eastern Brazil in order to explore the ways in which archetypes, ideologies and fictions both conceal and construct lived experience. Review by Alex Borkowski

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