Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Libita Clayton: Quantum Ghost

Libita Clayton, Quantum Ghost, 2019. Installation view.

For Libita Clayton’s first UK solo show the artist presents ‘Quantum Ghost’, an interlinked two-part encounter with the politics inherent to her familial heritage and the journey it took to give agency to its legacy. Review by Sophie Risner

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Ghislaine Leung: CONSTITUTION

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery evades concise summation. Description becomes easily lost in particularities, or overlooks specific works altogether. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd: Joins

Joins, Installation View, 2019, Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd

At the end of a long outdoor corridor filled with palms and tropical plants is Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd’s exhibition ‘Joins’ at Cell Project Space in East London. Bringing together a series of recent works, in addition to two spatial interventions in the gallery, the show explores the infrastructures that produce contemporary domestic space. Review by Bernard Hay

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NJ

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83 installation view

The sun-soaked palette of Rauschenberg’s home on Captiva Island in Florida, where he settled in 1970, is injected into works like Lipstick (Spread) (1981), with its crimson umbrella and smear of bubble-gum pink. Umbrellas find their way back into another highlight of the show, Untitled (Spread) (1982), where two open parasols like blooming sunflowers bring harmony to a reel of collaged pictures of the American flag, shipping containers and lithe athletes. Review by Claire Phillips

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The Photographers' Gallery, 16-18 Ramillies St, Soho, London W1F 7LW

All I Know Is What’s On The Internet

Degoutin & Wagon, World Brain, 2015, HD Video. All I Know Is What Is On The Internet, on display at The Photographers' Gallery until 24 February 2019.

To this exhibition’s immense credit, it avoids engaging in knee-jerk satire of the American President. Instead, his words serve as a jumping-off point to consider the blurrier than ever line between fact and fiction, and the changing nature of ‘the image’. Review by Adam Heardman

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MO Museum, Pylimo g. 17, Vilnius 01141, Lithuania

All Art Is About Us

Installation view, All Art is About Us exhibition, MO Museum, Vilnius.

The inaugural exhibition, ‘All Art is About Us’, is made up predominantly of painting, video installation and photography from the museum’s collection of Lithuanian art. Review by Gulnaz Can

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The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Rachel Maclean: The Lion and The Unicorn

The Lion and The Unicorn, Rachel Maclean, 2012

Maclean’s video work was created in the frenzied build up to the Scottish referendum, and sees the lion and unicorn from the Royal Coat of Arms personified by the artist in outrageously lurid get-up, lampooning the ridiculous regalia of power. Review by Clare Robson

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Secession, Friedrichstraße 12, 1010 Wien, Austria

Philipp Timischl: Artworks for all Age Groups

Philipp Timischl, Artworks For All Age Groups, exhibition view Secession 2018

Endeavouring to create yet another enhancing experience, the Austrian artist Philipp Timischl, in his exhibition ‘Artworks for all Age Groups’ at the Secession Wien, addresses questions of belonging, roots and queerness. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Workplace, The Old Post Office, 19-21 West Street Gateshead, Tyne & Wear NE8 1AD

Emily Hesse: The Taste of this History: A Church in my Mouth

Emily Hesse The, Shedding: The Glass Ceiling, 2018, Collage on found photograph, 43.25 x 57.5 x 3 cm

Hesse’s questioning of her own proximity to the notional centre of the art is illustrated by the circle drawn on the gallery floor that the pin hangs above - is she inside or outside the circuit of acceptance? The artist can be heard reading from her book ‘Black Birds Born from Invisible Stars’ which details touchingly her frequently disenchanting encounters with art institutions. Review by Piers Masterson

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance

Installation view of Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Oct 2018 - Jan 2019, Nottingham Contemporary.

‘Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance’ is the first act of an exhibition showing a kind of history of resistance through the means of feminisms and intersectional queer thinking. The curators started to build the exhibition as an idea two years ago. Then, we didn’t have #metoo and #timesup, Trump wasn’t yet the POTUS, women’s marches weren’t so much in the news ... Review by Gulnaz Can

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Auto Italia, 44 Bonner Road, London E2 9JS

Gran Fury: Read My Lips

Kissing Doesn't Kill, Gran Fury, 1990, vinyl wall poster

‘Read My Lips’ is a powerful retrospective of agitprop collective Gran Fury, an autonomous unit stemming from the New York caucus of radical international direct action group ‘AIDs Coalition To Unleash Power’ or ACT UP. Review by Sophie Risner

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Irish Museum of Modern Art, Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Military Rd, Kilmainham, Dublin 8, Ireland

Wolfgang Tillmans: Rebuilding the Future

Wolfgang Tillmans, Rebuilding the Future, 26 October 2018 – 17 February 2019, Installation view IMMA, Dublin, 2018

Tillmans’ selection and presentation of his work is unique to each setting and here we see the choice to present, for the first time in a number of years, the early-career hospital operating theatre ‘I’ and ‘II’ from 1994, in the setting of a former hospital; indicating the work’s sensitivity and ability to respond to its environment and shape the narrative. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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William Benington Gallery, Unit 3, 50 Tower Bridge Road, London, SE1 4TR and Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Amy Stephens: Land | Reland

Hood trail

Each work across both shows and throughout Stephens’ practice exists as part of an interlinking chain. She continually returns to and reuses ideas, allowing them to land and re-land, resisting the ossifying force of finitude and following the fluidity of nature’s endless cycles. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Messums Wiltshire, Place Farm, Court St, Tisbury, Salisbury SP3 6LW

IMAGE

BREAKFAST

While the focus here is on portrait and documentary photography, the works in the barn present a rupture to a historically male-dominated practice. Contemporary works by artists such as Juno Calypso and Maisie Cousins, typified by vivid colours, theatrical staging and a disciplined control of the viewer’s gaze, challenge a legacy of image-making that has often elided female experience; highlighting the constructed nature of photography rather than offering it as guarantor of truth. Review by Daniel Pateman

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