Castor Projects, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Habitual

Installation view

Entering the gallery through the small front door, the audience is directed towards the exhibition through a segue into a seemingly empty, light grey space with a lonesome bench and a large wooden structure in the corner. At this point there is still no sign of any art in an exhibition of 19 artists. However, instead of a conventional commercial group exhibition, ‘Habitual’ unfolds within the theatrical setting of a compulsive collector’s storage solution. Review by Sonja Teszler

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Bosse & Baum, Unit BGC, Ground Floor, Bussey Building, 133 Rye Lane, SE15 4ST

Candida Powell-Williams: The Gates of Apophenia

Candida Powell-Williams, Gates of Apophenia, installation view, Bosse & Baum, 2019.

Candida Powell-Williams’ installation, at Bosse & Baum in South London, feels like a series of frustrated movements: you move into, through, and around; there are loops that fail to revolve. The show is based on the tarot, and these movements act as invocations to interpret, and to delve into the symbols at play. In the way of both movement and interpretation, the idea of resolution is repeatedly engaged and refused in kind. Review by Harriet Smith Hughes

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Kettle's Yard, Castle St, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Linderism

Glorification de l'Elue

Beyond the punk façade of the artist known just as ‘Linder’, there is an intricate weaver of narratives and miner of myths to be found. Kettle’s Yard’s sensory and expansive retrospective makes this apparent. Review by Clare Robson

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Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Sulaïman Majali: saracen go home

Sulaiman Majali: saracen go home, Collective, Edinburgh, installation photograph, 1 February — 29 March 2020

On stage is a single mic stand before a row of empty seats. A recording ushers us towards the sounds of the Middle East. But where are the actors? And what is this scene? Dispersed upon the stage are the scattered pieces of diasporic memory. Review by Elaine Y.J Zheng

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Dora Maar

Dora Maar at Tate Modern, 2019.

Tate Modern here highlights how vast, rich and varied Maar’s work was, over five decades, in striking curatorial choices. It powerfully repairs an injustice in the history of art. Moving chronologically from her first photographs to her experimental return to the dark room, the exhibition displays different phases of a sublime career, kick-started in an iconic place and time: Paris in the 1930s within the Surrealist movement. Review by Melissa Chemam

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Sung Tieu: In Cold Print

Recruitment Agreements Between Nations, 2015. Subnational Enterprise installation view at Dong Xuan Center, Berlin, 16 May - 13 June, 2015.

Sung Tieu’s new show at Nottingham Contemporary, ‘In Cold Print’ brings to light the physiological aspects of Cold War ideologies by re-contextualizing them in modern day warfare, looking at ideas of weaponry as silent, ghostly or in some way intangible. Review by Lucy Holt

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CAN Christina Androulidaki Gallery, Panagiotou Anagnostopoulou 42, Athina 106 73, Greece

Celia Daskopoulou

Untitled

In this extraordinary show, CAN Gallery focuses on paintings of men from the 1980s and 90s by Greek artist Celia Daskopoulou. Like many avant-garde Greek artists Daskopoulou left her conservative native country to study in Paris in the 1960s, returning to Athens in the 1970s where she developed her mature style. This largely focused on heavily stylised portraits of women that satirised traditional female depiction and roles in society. Review by William Summerfield

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Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Patrick Goddard: Trip to Eclipse

Patrick Goddard, Trip To Eclipse (2020), installation shot.

‘Trip To Eclipse’ is a new installation by Patrick Goddard, exhibited at Matt’s Gallery following his participation in the Blackrock Residency in 2016, a collaboration between the gallery and the Lydney Park Estate. The title is a reference to a 1990s clothing label, which was more popular amongst children and teens than the actual rave culture it proposed to represent. Think: bomber jackets and ultra-baggy jeans, graffiti and spliffs. Review by Chris Hayes

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Lauren Gault: C I T H R A

Lauren Gault, C I T H R A, 2020. Installation view. Commissioned by Gasworks.

Lauren Gault’s exhibition ‘C I T H R A’ at Gasworks, London, is a show of strange encounters. The installation continues the artist’s interest in the possibilities of materials, using ‘sculptural language as a connective tissue’ for her wider research. Review by Tess Charnley

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Live Art Development Agency, The Garrett Centre, 117 Mansford Street, London, E2 6LX

LADA Screens: selina bonelli

LADA presents a screening of (re)collecting (f)ears, a film documenting a number of performances by the artist selina bonelli. The event also features readings from (re)collecting (f)ears, a publication featuring artistic responses to the project, and a conversation between selina bonelli and Joseph Morgan Schofield (LADA).

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Blvd, Nottingham NG7 6BE

Shezad Dawood: Encroachments

Shezad Dawood, Encroachments. Installation view, New Art Exchange, 2020

Shezad Dawood’s exhibition is overrun with multi-coloured terrazzo. The walls are plastered with garish speckles, which seep into paintings, prints, plinths and even the exhibition guide. The terrazzo, designed by Dawood, gives the display a Pop-y veneer, strengthened by visual allusions to Robert Rauschenberg’s collages and Andy Warhol’s silkscreens, as well as tributes to the arcade game, Space Invaders. Review by Julia Schouten

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Jerwood Arts,171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/Photoworks Awards

Silvia Rosi, Jerwood/Photoworks Awards 2020 supported by Jerwood Arts and Photoworks. Installation view at Jerwood Space, London.

The Jerwood/Photoworks Awards is a significant opportunity for an early career artist to develop their work over the course of a year with the benefit of financial support and a program of mentoring. The 2020 winners are Silvia Rosi and Theo Simpson and their commissioned work is currently on view at Jerwood Arts. The award boasts its effort to encourage artists who engage with photography in an experimental way. Review by Katie McCain

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LOOCK Galerie, Potsdamer Strasse 63, DE 10785 Berlin

Christian Borchert: Familienporträts

Familienporträts by Christian Borchert at Loock, Berlin

Christian’s Borchert’s ‘Familienporträts’ pull the viewer in off the cold West Berlin street, into a position of a post-Cold War voyeur; peering into the domestic situations of individual families who lived through the DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik) and then what became of them after. Review by Nicola Jeffs

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