Pace Gallery, Quai des Bergues 15-17, 1201 Geneva

teamLab | Opera Turandot

Opera Turandot, at Grand Théâtre de Genève, Geneva © Magali Dougados, Courtesy Daniel Kramer, Grand Théâtre de Genève, and Pace Gallery

Pace Gallery is delighted to announce Existence in an Infinite Continuity, a solo exhibition of new work by teamLab. This exhibition marks the interdisciplinary art collective’s first presentation in Geneva and coincides with a landmark stage design and scenography takeover at the Grand Théâtre de Genève. From the press release - In case you missed it, Nadia Egan sits down for an exclusive interview with teamLab.

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Abingdon Studios, 14 Abingdon Street, Blackpool FY1 1DE

Rafał Zajko: SLOT

Installation view, Rafał Zajko: SLOT

Exposed pipes from the building’s radiators lead the visitor from the entrance, weaving upstairs and through walls to ‘Slot’, the first solo presentation by artist Rafał Zajko in the North of England, comprised of five wall-based sculptures and accompanying hand-painted murals. Review by Ryan Kearney

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Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke St, Oxford OX1 1BP

Ruth Asawa | Citizen of the Universe

Ruth Asawa, Citizen of the Universe, installation view at Modern Art Oxford

“During the last week I’ve been drawing,” writes John Berger in Confabulations, “asking myself whether natural forms – a tree, a cloud, a river, a stone, a flower – can be looked at and perceived as messages. Messages – it goes without saying – which can never be verbalized, and are not particularly addressed to us.” Ascending the stairs into Modern Art Oxford, one enters a strange forest. Lit from many angles, casting duplicate shadows, the distinctive hanging sculptures of American artist Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) float as if suspended in deep water. Written by Rowland Bagnall

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LAXART, California Route 2, 7000 Santa Monica Blvd, West Hollywood, CA 90038, United States

Takers | Nikita Gale

Installation Shot, 'Takers'

It is impossible not to be drawn into the fight that perpetually unfolds on the projection wall at the centre of the darkened gallery. The grunts and smacks of two men engaging in an unrelenting, no-holds-barred fist fight resonate throughout the very room they were recorded in. Onscreen, fists and limbs puncture drywall. The holes, still visible behind the screen, swiftly cast the gallery as both a film set and an art space. Review by Reuben Merringer

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Galeria Plan B Potsdamer Str. 77-87, 10785 Berlin, Germany

Adrian Ganea | Ghost Trade

Ghost

A magical forest world is the last thing you expect to find as you make your way through the industrial setting that houses Galeria Plan B. Yet, nestled behind the gallery’s front door, the mystic realm that is Adrian Ganea’s ‘Ghost Trade’ becomes a reality. With an extensive background in scenography for theatre and performance, the Romanian-born artist sets the stage for an enchanting musical dialogue between a cast of uncanny tree-like creatures. Review by Nadia Egan.

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Dundee Contemporary Arts, 152 Nethergate, Dundee DD1 4DY

Douglas Gordon | k.364

k.364

“I’m always thinking…when you go from Germany…something about those trees…” The disembodied voice is likely that of the violinist Roi Shiloah talking on a train bound from Berlin to Warsaw via Poznań with viola player, Avri Levitan and artist Douglas Gordon. “I don’t have any Holocaust complex, but when I see those trees…unbelievable…when it’s cold and snowing…those are the only moments I think about it…to be outside in the freezing weather…so cold.” Shiloah and Levitan, both Israelis of Polish descent, are heading to Warsaw’s Philharmonic concert hall to perform the lead duet in Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat major, also known as “k.364”, after which the exhibition is named. Review by Greg Thomas.

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PACE Gallery, 5 Hanover Square, London W1S 1HQ

Thunderbolt Disco | Robert Nava

Night and Day Separator

There is something visceral about being in the room with Robert Nava’s latest paintings, currently exhibited at PACE Gallery, London. The work is immediate. You can feel the techno mixes, by the likes of Macro Plex and LL Cool J, in lieu of heartbeats, to which each of the figures—benevolent, evil and ambivalent—has been painted by the artist in his Brooklyn studio. Review by Clara Nissim

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ALICE BLACK, 46 Mortimer St London, W1W 7RL

Thirst of the Tide | Rachael Louise Bailey

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Bailey’s practice is a form of artistic whistle-blowing. Pushing the boundaries of art’s engagement with ecology, her practice is rooted in a local context but has a worldwide reach embedded in the social, political, economic and environmental spheres she seeks to address and expose. Bailey stands in opposition to contemporary greenwashing. ‘Thirst of the Tide’ brings together iconic pieces from Bailey’s ‘the black stuff’ series as well as new, site-specific works. She relishes the exploration of materiality and is bemused by our anthropocentric dislocation from our roots. The departure point for the exhibition is the concept of strata - geologically, environmentally, sociologically and psychologically. From the press release.

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Addis Fine Art, 21 Eastcastle St, London W1W 8DD

PACE OF LIFE | NIGATU TSEHAY

Pace of Life Exhibition/Installation

Addis Fine Art London presents 'Pace of Life' by Nigatu Tsehay. A new body of work that explores the interrelations between human beings and the spaces they inhabit. The exhibition is a part of the 2022 edition of London Gallery Weekend. Born in Addis Ababa and currently working in Frankfurt, Nigatu’s works are inspired by his lived experience within different cultures and the shared humanity that he’s encountered. Rich with human forms, Nigatu likens his canvases to a suddenly paused film scene – an instant in time bearing the weight of existence. His works are replete with distorted characters who frequently gaze in disparate directions, hands and feet punctuating a forested twist of limbs. From the press release.

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Serpentine Galleries Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster | Alienarium 5

Metapanorama detail

Bettina Korek, CEO, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Artistic Director, Serpentine, say: “Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster is an artist synonymous with experimentation, whose career has spanned decades of research into sensorial and existential dimensions of human life. As such, we are honoured that she has accepted our invitation to create a bold, immersive environment that we hope will change the ways that those who experience it think, see and feel. It is with great anticipation that we look forward to inviting audiences to encounter her phenomenological ‘mise-en-espace,’ to quote the artist herself.”

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Sadie Coles HQ, 62 Kingly Street W1

Seth Price | Art Is Not Human

My Hand Is Already Dead crop

Seth Price has rarely shown in the UK; this exhibition marks his first solo gallery presentation in London since his film and video survey at the ICA London in 2017. Born in 1973 and based in New York, Price works in many media, experimenting with contemporary materials and themes to evoke a sense of “increasing abstraction, the alienated self, all the weird ways that material and immaterial go back and forth,” as he explained in a recent interview. From the press release.

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Chisenhale Gallery 64 Chisenhale Rd, Old Ford, London E3 5QZ

Rachel Jones | Say Cheeeeese

Say cheeeeese installation view

Rachel Jones’ latest body of expansive canvases at Chisenhale Gallery, London beams with colour and complexity. A continuation of her ongoing exploration of semi-visible teeth, Jones’ newest paintings feel as much like expressionistic landscapes as they do depictions of technicolour jaws. Review by Kate Kirby

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IMT Gallery Unit 2/210 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 9NQ

Thomson & Craighead | No Escape

See through

“They dream of a new life in orbit; a new life on the moon; on asteroids, and on the dead planet of Mars. They dream of leaving their mistakes behind and starting again. They dream and dream and dream but there is no escape. Back at Ground Zero, we live with their mistakes ever more divided, a little warmer every year.” - Thomson & Craighead (2022)

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Harlesden High Street, 57 High Street, London NW10 4NJ

Dream Rich | Hongxi Li

Dream rich, solo show

At the cornerstone of Plato's theory of forms - where the essence of a thing is what we know, and that essence is its form - we find the humble chair. We don't need all chairs to look the same to know they fit into the category of items we refer to as a "chair", which we understand as a stool to sit on. The essence of something is also its purpose. So when an exhibition takes up the chair and negates its chairness, is it still a chair? Review by Jillian Knipe.

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