Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

Newstalgia

Elisabeth Molin, Ate Chocolate, (edible monuments) 2018

‘Newstalgia’ is shifting common ways of memorialisation into question. It does this through exposing attempts to activate social and cultural habits that remember and question contemporary ways to fulfil civil duties – to re-evaluate economic, cultural and societal operations. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Plymouth College of Art, Tavistock Pl, Plymouth PL4 8AT

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency installation view

Simon Bayliss’ exhibition, Meditations in an Emergency, is an exhibition of multitudes, crossing from pottery and electronic music to watercolour landscapes, poetry and performative film. The show by is a marriage of the seemingly incongruous, such as the neon sign alternating SIMON BAYLISS / SIN ON GAY BLISS reflecting on the glazing of his pottery. It is a joining, as the words inscribed on the pot reads, of ‘high and low with one another’. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Campoli Presti, 223 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 0EL

Rochelle Feinstein: Rainbow Room / The Year in Hate

Rochelle Feinstein, Rainbow Room (diptych), 2018. Diptych, Acrylic, embroidery and collage on canvas

Bringing together a new body of work created this past year, the exhibition makes two opposing propositions, each one presented in one of the gallery’s two rooms. The propositions are based two formal devices: the rainbow and the calendar. Review by Edmée Lepercq

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Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1S 1BP

Sean Scully: Uninsideout

Sean Scully, What Makes Us, 2017

The show provides an interesting point of entry to the work of this Irish-born American-based painter. Split across two rooms, ‘Uninsideout’ asks us to focus on the musicality of Scully’s work; the artist is quoted as saying ‘one stripe is a note, many are a chord, all are played by hand.’ Review by Clare Robson

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Amy Sillman: Landline

Amy Sillman, Dub Stamp, 2018, a multi-part series of double-sided acrylic, ink, and silkscreen works on paper, 152.5 × 101.5 cm each

The fact that the show extends throughout all the galleries of the institution functions as a clear statement that the artist has disembarked in the UK – ‘Landline’ is her first institutional exhibition in the country. This also, however, allows visitors to view the breadth of Sillman’s artistic landscape: one where abstraction and figuration coexist, through her multifarious drawings, print works and pieces executed with oil and a variety of media. Review by Carolina Mostert

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Studio Voltaire, 1a Nelsons Row, London SW4 7JR

The Oscar Wilde Temple

Oscar Wilde Temple by McDermott & McGough, Studio Voltaire, London 3 October 2018 to 31 March 2019.

Referring to martyrdom’s queer capacity, McDermott & McGough’s ambitious installation ‘The Oscar Wilde Temple’ at Studio Voltaire promotes an awareness of cross-generational queer activism. Review by Ryan Kearney

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Museum Frieder Burda | Salon Berlin, Auguststraße 11-13 10117 Berlin

Candice Breitz: Sex Work

TLDR (Featured here: Connie, Nosipho Vidima)

The film feels more like a piece of entertainment than it should, and it left less of an impact on me than the interviews themselves. One, in which a woman describes a horrifying act of rape by a police officer, will linger with me for a long time. Review by Siobhan Leddy

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Survey

Installation View of Survey at Jerwood Space, London, 3 October - 16 December 2018.

An assembly of work from fifteen early career artists who have been nominated from across the UK, ‘Survey’ is an exhibition comprising a wide range of disciplines. From film, performance and drawing, to painting, ceramics and installation, it gives rising voices within the sector the opportunity to stand out and stand up. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Galleria Lorcan O'Neill Roma, Vicolo Dei Catinari, 3, 00186 Roma RM, Italy

Eddie Peake: People

Eddie Peake: People, 2018 installation view

As an artist whose brightly hued spray-painted canvases initially come across as playfully light-hearted, Peake also allows a psychological duress to permeate the paintings exhibited. Review by Ariane Belisle

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RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London, W1B 1AD

Disappear Here: On perspective and other kinds of space

Disappear Here: On perspective and other kinds of space RIBA exhibition designed by Sam Jacob studio

“Disappear Here is not a history of perspective”, immediately declares the introductory wall text. Instead, RIBA’s exhibition offers a selection of curiously, sometimes bewilderingly, diverse, subversive readings of the system of spatial representation. Review by Henry Broome

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Michael Jackson: On the Wall

Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II (Michael Jackson)

The religious aspects of the exhibition are divided. Some works stand as testament to Jackson’s enigmatic international appeal. One room contains footage from the 1992 Dangerous world tour, revealing delirious crowds, a mass euphoria even outstripping Beatlemania: while the Fab Four played to 55,000 people at Shea Stadium in 1965, Jackson’s concert in Bucharest is estimated to have been attended by nearly 100,000. And the numbers don’t stop there: more than 1,000,000 fans are said to have congregated outside Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, while the televised spectacle itself is said to have been watched by more than 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. “We’re more popular than Jesus,” said Lennon of the Beatles in 1966. One wonders where this places Jackson. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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CGP London, The Gallery by the Pool, 1 Park Approach, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA

The Everyday Political

The Everyday Political installation view 2018

As the exhibition attempts to showcase an emerging contemporary art scene in the North East, Lenihan and Meikle while critiquing the banal geographical rubric used by the current Great North Exhibition – this exhibition is not part of the official programme – the pair insightfully identify ‘restorative nostalgia’ and the appeal of the ‘off-modern’ as two subjects that fixate the cultural landscape of the region. Review by Piers Masterson

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Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London, NW1 5DA

Mary Corse

Mary Corse, installation view, Lisson Gallery London, May 2018

Mary Corse’s first major UK show at Lisson Gallery, London, is as much a scientific inquiry as it is art. Newtonian science extracts emotion from the situations it is used to examine, the same, by extension, could be said of its strange alter ego quantum mechanics. Review by Matthew Turner

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Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art (Modern One), 75 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DR

Jenny Saville: Trace

JENNY SAVILLE  Olympia, 2013 - 2014  Charcoal and oil on canvas, 217 x 290 cm copyright Jenny Saville.  Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian

Jenny Saville’s paintings have always explored the insistence of corporeal mass, the fleshiness of flesh...

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