Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Thomas Bock and Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate

James and Henry Barnard

The first UK-exhibition dedicated to the work of the Birmingham-born convict artist, Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855), at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, is paired with the concurrent exhibition, Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate. This was the the result of a three-year residency spent by the artist at HMP Grendon – Europe’s only entirely therapeutic prison. Despite widely differing careers they both viscerally remind us of the dangers of denying any person a sense of identity. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Cass Sculpture Foundation, New Barn Hill, Goodwood, West Sussex PO18 0QP

The Sleeping Procession

CASS Projects: The Sleeping Procession exhibition. Curated by Sean Steadman and Gabriel Hartley

‘The Sleeping Procession’, a bright and upbeat group exhibition curated by emerging artists Gabriel Hartley and Sean Steadman occupies the gallery with ease. It is a jovial gathering, inspired by the Foundation’s archive of maquettes which the pair have put in dialogue with works by their peers and a number of artists whose work they have found influential. Review by Rebecca Partridge

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Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre, Gibbet Hill Rd, Coventry CV4 7AL

Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

Installation view, Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

The internet and advertising provide us with a constant barrage of images. In the face of this mass it can be hard to find meaning. Clare Woods' current exhibition at Mead Gallery is a direct refusal of this position. She presents only a handful of works to allow us a clarity of vision which is incredibly refreshing. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Chiba City Museum of Art: 3 Chome-10-8 Chuo, Chiba, Chiba Prefecture 260-0013, Japan

Tsuyoshi Ozawa: Imperfection: Parallel Art History

Imperfection

Tsuyoshi Ozawa not only interrogates modern Japanese art history, illuminating the unique and sometimes odd pathways it has taken, he also questions the acts of looking and showing. He is distinct from Takashi Murakami, who proudly proclaimed the value of forgotten history by pushing anime-like figures to the forefront. Ozawa keeps an unstable and ambiguous position, enjoying the diverse and imaginative visions sustained by his perspicacity and sense of humour. Review by Kodama Kanazawa

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Michael Armitage: The Chapel

Michael Armitage, The Chapel, installation view at the South London Gallery, 2017.

Following on from his excellent show in summer 2017 at Turner Contemporary with this exhibition of eight new paintings, Michael Armitage stakes a strong claim to being the leading figurative painter of the group that has emerged from London art schools in the last decade. Review by Piers Masterson

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National Galleries of Scotland, 73 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DS

NOW | Susan Philipsz, Michael Armitage, Yto Barrada, Kate Davis, Hiwa K, Sarah Rose

Seven Tears, 2016

NOW is the second in a six-part series of exhibitions presented by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art exploring the work of international contemporary artists. It is dominated by a 5 room display of works by the artist Susan Philipsz alongside works by renowned artists Kate Davis, Sarah Rose, Hiwa K, Michael Armitage and Yto Barrada. Review by Rosie Priest

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014, USA

Laura Owens

Untitled, 2015 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York)

The Whitney Museum of American Art has historically positioned itself in the public imagination as an incontrovertible arbiter of taste, the sort of claim that makes its stale, self-consciously presentist choices all the more discouraging. As such, the Laura Owens retrospective currently on view feels less like the mid-career survey of a serious painter and more like an overblown Instagram backdrop, a pandering move that undercuts Owens’ contributions and reasserts the Whitney’s distance from artistic innovation. Review by Torey Akers

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Museumpark 18-20, 3015 CX Rotterdam, Netherlands

Academy of Tal R

Academy of Tal R Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

As seen in Tal R's mid-career retrospective, Academy of Tal R, currently at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, he tends to work in series and employs intermittently recurring motifs yet his subject matter, compositional arrangements and application of materials evidences an approach that is anything but doctrinaire. Review by John Gayer

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Rose Wylie: Quack Quack

 Rose Wylie, Installation view, Quack Quack, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London

Rose Wylie’s paintings have previously been dismissed as ‘childish’. Her forms are decisive, irreverent, lucid; facial expressions are often reduced to a mere few brushstrokes. In this way, her paintings are, in fact, childhood remembered and rendered exactly as it exists for us as adults – as hazy fragments, as depictions not just of events or places, but of how it felt to be there. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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Pace Gallery, 510 West 25th Street, New York NY 10001

Elizabeth Murray: Painting in the ‘80s

Installation view of Elizabeth Murray: Painting in the '80s 510 West 25th Street, New York

In the 1980s a new generation of painters had broken through. The pieces were big, the personas even bigger. Names like Fischl, Salle, and Schnabel became not just salient, but sexy. While this landscape hardly embraced women participants, innovators like Elizabeth Murray, the subject of an excellent retrospective currently on display at Pace’s 25th St. location in Chelsea, transcended dismissal through persistence.

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Turner Contemporary, Rendezvous, Margate CT9 1HG

Hans Arp: The Poetry of Forms

Installation view of Jean Arp: The Poetry of Forms at Turner Contemporary, Margate. 13 October 2017 - 14 January 2018.

In the first exhibition of Arp’s work in the UK since his death in 1966, Turner Contemporary exhibits a selective retrospective of the multi-linguist’s works and ideas spanning from early Dadaist pieces such as the poem ‘Kaspar ist tot’ to the sculpture, ‘Étoile’, a hollow melting star that marks his grave in Locarno. Review by Evie Ward

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Artist Interview: Lubaina Himid

Interview: Lubaina Himid

Lubaina Himid

Ahead of tonight's Turner Prize winner announcement, which she is odds on to win, Cleo Roberts, art historian and research associate at Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, interviewed Lubaina Himid to find out more about her practice, research process and the intricacies of her visual language.

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Matthew Marks Gallery, 523 W 24th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Gary Hume: Mum

Ripe

Matthew Marks is pleased to announce Gary Hume: Mum, the next exhibition in his gallery at 522 West 22nd Street. This body of work focuses on a range of subjects, but at its core is a suite of highly personal paintings about memory and loss. Hume’s mother is 86 years old and suffers from dementia. And while the ostensible subjects of many of the new paintings are flowers, their titles — Mourning, Spent, Blind — reflect Hume’s thoughts of her.

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