Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

MO Museum, Pylimo g. 17, Vilnius 01141, Lithuania

All Art Is About Us

Installation view, All Art is About Us exhibition, MO Museum, Vilnius.

The inaugural exhibition, ‘All Art is About Us’, is made up predominantly of painting, video installation and photography from the museum’s collection of Lithuanian art. Review by Gulnaz Can

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The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019

Sofia Mitsola, Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019, installation view

For its spring show, Jerwood Visual Arts has commissioned new bodies of work from three artists at pivotal points in their careers: Kitty Clark, Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom and Sofia Mitsola. This is the fourth iteration of Jerwood Solo Presentations, and the guidance notes explain that there is no curatorial theme uniting the chosen artists; these are three very different offerings, but each is powerful in its own way. Review by Anna Souter

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mother’s tankstation, 41- 43 Watling Street, Usher’s Island, Dublin, D08 NP48, Ireland

Lee Kit: Banal

Blue skied and clear

As you enter Dublin’s mother’s tankstation and Lee Kit’s ‘Banal’ you are greeted by Gnarls Barkley’s 2006 hit song ‘Crazy’. A search for the source of ‘I think you’re crazy’ (2017) reveals a pair of headphones overhead, dangled upside down and tantalisingly out of reach - and out of use. On the wall Kit has, through a plastic storage container, projected a video that has some of the song’s lyrics overlaid, with others missing. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome

Installation views: Art Now: Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome, 2018

In the single-room space Tate Britain has devoted to the current ‘Art Now’ exhibition, there’s a crooked forest made from crutches and open ring-binders, clustered in front of a wall with a large, cartoonish hole punched through it. The piece is Jesse Darling’s ‘St Jerome in the Wilderness’ (2018). Walking between the sticks and peering into the gap in the wall, you’re confronted with the slapstick tragedy of physical existence. ‘Brazen Serpent’ (2018), a walking-stick coiled to look like a snake, seems to follow you through the “trees”. In trying to protect or medicate ourselves, perhaps we’re in fact acknowledging our own fragility. You can’t avoid the threat implicit within contingency plans. Review by Adam Heardman

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Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 Duke Street, St James's, London SW1Y 6BN

Amie Siegel: Backstory

The Noon Complex, 2016, three-channel HD video installation, colour/sound, edition 2 of 5 + 2AP

Amie Siegel’s exhibition ‘Backstory’ at London’s Thomas Dane Gallery opens with an unassuming series of works on paper. ‘Body Scripts’ (2015) consists of framed pages from a novel by Italian novelist Alberto Moravia that was the inspiration for Jean-Luc Godard’s classic film ‘Contempt’ (1963). Using only pages that feature the female protagonist, the artist uses sea-blue paint to erase phrases and sentences that don’t directly refer to the character. The result is an architectural geometry that flows from frame to frame and creates a visual context for the actions of the protagonist. Review by Anna Souter

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Christine Ay Tjoe: Black, kcalB, Black, kcalB

Christine Ay Tjoe, Black, kcalB, Black, kcalB, White Cube Bermondsey, 28 November 2018 - 20 January 2019

Christine Ay Tyoe’s second exhibition at White Cube presents the artist in a darker, pensive, more Gothic mood than her more colourful debut here in 2016. Half the works shown are a series of aluminium etching plates on which the artist has drawn in black ink a bestiary of her familiar grotesques. Review by Piers Masterson

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Victoria Miro, 14 St George St, Mayfair, London W1S 1FH

Ilse D’Hollander

Untitled

In much the same way as Francesca Woodman though, whose early death at the age of just 22 has made her into something of a cult figure, D’Hollander’s paintings are cast in the shadow of her personal history. Review by Claire Phillips

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Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

Newstalgia

Elisabeth Molin, Ate Chocolate, (edible monuments) 2018

‘Newstalgia’ is shifting common ways of memorialisation into question. It does this through exposing attempts to activate social and cultural habits that remember and question contemporary ways to fulfil civil duties – to re-evaluate economic, cultural and societal operations. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Plymouth College of Art, Tavistock Pl, Plymouth PL4 8AT

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency installation view

Simon Bayliss’ exhibition, Meditations in an Emergency, is an exhibition of multitudes, crossing from pottery and electronic music to watercolour landscapes, poetry and performative film. The show by is a marriage of the seemingly incongruous, such as the neon sign alternating SIMON BAYLISS / SIN ON GAY BLISS reflecting on the glazing of his pottery. It is a joining, as the words inscribed on the pot reads, of ‘high and low with one another’. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Campoli Presti, 223 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 0EL

Rochelle Feinstein: Rainbow Room / The Year in Hate

Rochelle Feinstein, Rainbow Room (diptych), 2018. Diptych, Acrylic, embroidery and collage on canvas

Bringing together a new body of work created this past year, the exhibition makes two opposing propositions, each one presented in one of the gallery’s two rooms. The propositions are based two formal devices: the rainbow and the calendar. Review by Edmée Lepercq

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Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1S 1BP

Sean Scully: Uninsideout

Sean Scully, What Makes Us, 2017

The show provides an interesting point of entry to the work of this Irish-born American-based painter. Split across two rooms, ‘Uninsideout’ asks us to focus on the musicality of Scully’s work; the artist is quoted as saying ‘one stripe is a note, many are a chord, all are played by hand.’ Review by Clare Robson

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Amy Sillman: Landline

Amy Sillman, Dub Stamp, 2018, a multi-part series of double-sided acrylic, ink, and silkscreen works on paper, 152.5 × 101.5 cm each

The fact that the show extends throughout all the galleries of the institution functions as a clear statement that the artist has disembarked in the UK – ‘Landline’ is her first institutional exhibition in the country. This also, however, allows visitors to view the breadth of Sillman’s artistic landscape: one where abstraction and figuration coexist, through her multifarious drawings, print works and pieces executed with oil and a variety of media. Review by Carolina Mostert

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