Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

TACO!, 30 Poplar Place, Thamesmead, London SE28 8BA

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?, installation view, TACO!

The current exhibition ‘Can You Feel It?’ explores the polaric feelings of euphoria and loss which surround 90s rave culture and its legacy. Artist Joe Cheetham, known primarily for his works on canvas, has here created a gallery-spanning wall mural which depicts a number of beano-on-ecstasy style cartoon characters, straight from the pages of Viz magazine. Review by Amy Jones

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Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, No. 145, DLF South Court Mall, Shaheed Pankaj Juyal Marg, Saket District Centre, Saket, New Delhi, Delhi 110017, India

Arpita Singh: Six Decades of Painting

Whatever is Here

The Kiran Nadar Museum of Arts presents the first ever retrospective of one of India’s most significant female artists, Arpita Singh. Review by Pranamita Borgohain

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Kettle's Yard, Castle Street, Cambridge, CB3 0AQ

Oscar Murillo: Violent Amnesia

Oscar Murillo, Violent Amnesia, 2019. Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge

“No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” Oscar Murillo’s current exhibition at Kettle’s Yard starts with these words by John Donne. This quote is a testimony of the artist’s mourning for his friend, Nigerian curator and unique contributor to the art world, Okwui Enwezor, who died earlier this year. But it makes me think that if Murillo were an island, he would have been a floating island. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Mandy El-Sayegh: Cite Your Sources

Mandy El-Sayegh, Cite Your Sources (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019.

Verbal language dominates and hits you like a wave; pages from the Financial Times are pasted up the gallery walls and underfoot; silk-screened advertising copy, schematics and Arabic calligraphy are layered on top of maps, passport-photocopies, grids and each other. Review by India Nielsen

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Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Krymsky Val, 9 строение 32, Moskva, Russia, 119049

Pavel Pepperstein: The Human as a Frame for the Landscape

Pavel Pepperstein, The Human as a Frame for the Landscape, installation view, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, 2019

The work of Pavel Pepperstein is, to western audiences, often impenetrable — not least because it often relies upon references to in-jokes and Russian-Language text. Pepperstein is interested in exploding-out historical moments and psychedelic experiences and picking through the debris. He’s called it “the spiritual backstage”. Review by Lucy Holt

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MK Gallery, 900 Midsummer Blvd, Milton Keynes MK9 3QA

The Lie of the Land

The Crowning

Milton Keynes is quite unlike any other place in the UK. A new, modernist town built in the 1960s to provide somewhere to live for people who worked in London. A town built out of concrete, marble and glass. A town built on a grid. A few decades later the place became known as a haven for various subcultures; ravers, skateboarders and boy racers all flocked to the town, youthful rebellion disrupting the grid. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Bloc Projects, 71 Eyre Lane, Sheffield S1 4RB

Joy Labinjo: As We Were

Untitled

Six vividly-coloured paintings hang in the exhibition space at Bloc Projects, a small artist-led gallery in Sheffield presenting an entirely new body of work by British-Nigerian artist Joy Labinjo. Most focus on an individual or two against a bright, opaque background; the paintings are large, smooth and confident in their application, and bold and graphic in their style. Review by Clare Robson

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Regen Projects, 6750 Santa Monica Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90038, USA

Christina Quarles: But I Woke Jus’ Tha Same

Change'll Come (Eventually)

‘But I Woke Jus’ Tha Same’ is a solo exhibition featuring Christina Quarles’ new paintings and drawings in which she explores how bodies interact in social environments. At first glance, her command of a rich artistic language—gestural and controlled, textured and flat, biomorphic and angular—makes her work immediately intriguing. Review by Vivian Chun-Wei Lin

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Hauser & Wirth, Durslade Farm Dropping Lane, Bruton Somerset BA10 0NL

Matthew Day Jackson: Pathetic Fallacy

Installation view, Matthew Day Jackson, Pathetic Fallacy, Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 2019

“Our engagement with nature, to occupy it and to flatten it to a certain extent … That’s the beginning point,” says artist Matthew Day Jackson on his exhibition ‘Pathetic Fallacy’, the result of a months’ residency in Somerset. During his time in England, the American artist had what he described as a mind-blowing experience of the countryside and kept thinking about how space was organised around the human body, nature, architecture and sculpture. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 4PY

FOCUS: Agnes Martin

FOCUS: Agnes Martin. Installation view, Levy Gorvy, London, 2019.

This is an artist who spent her life in the pursuit of abstract painting: grids and stripes, minimal yet expressive abstractions, imperfect horizontal lines in soft, pastel shades and faint, pencil-drawn grids. A similarly meditative, light-bathed atmosphere pervades the film, and it is a revelation to see Martin’s artistic vision realised in the bread-and-butter reality of the physical landscape. Review by Clare Robson

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Locks Gallery, 600 S Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

Sarah McEneaney: Callowhill

Studio

Sarah McEneaney’s painting technique is deceptively simple, reminiscent almost of folk art in its deliberate flatness, bright colours, elevated viewpoint, and attention to surface detail. Review by Deborah Krieger

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tracey Emin A Fortnight of Tears

Tracey Emin, A Fortnight of Tears, White Cube Bermondsey, 6 February - 7 April 2019

The paintings in this exhibition splatter the flesh, blood and mucus palettes of Francis Bacon and Cy Twombly across Egon Schiele’s warped technical accuracy of human anatomy. It’s some of the best painting Emin has done for years and is enough to carry the less potent parts of the exhibition. The neon and the selfies seem to blare some loud but ineloquent kind of intimacy at you, and don’t come near the compositional mastery of the paintings and sculptures. Review by Adam Heardman

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Primary, 33 Seely Road Nottingham, NG7 1NU & New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham NG7 6BE

Hardeep Pandhal: Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME

Hardeep Pandhal, Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME (2019), Primary

Nottingham galleries, New Art Exchange and Primary present ‘Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME’, a split-site exhibition of recent and ongoing works by Hardeep Pandhal. A second generation British Sikh now based in Glasgow, Pandhal dissects continuing projects of cultural assimilation and the performance of heritage. Review by Amelia Seren Roberts

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SFMOMA, 151 Third St, San Francisco, CA 94103

Vija Celmins: To Fix the Image in Memory

Vija Celmins, Suspended Plane, 1966; oil on canvas

Best known for her photorealist drawings and paintings in monochrome or grey tones, Celmins’ work has always shown a fascination with what we see, how we see it, and the experience of seeing itself. ‘To Fix the Image in Memory’ presents some of Celmins’ most iconic works. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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