Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Cubitt, 8 Angel Mews, London N1 9HH

Hardeep Pandhal: Liar Hydrant

Hardeep Pandhal, Liar Hydrant Mood Board detail, Cubitt Gallery, 2018.

The video works layer lurid cartoons, psychedelic narratives and deadpan rap music; they are accompanied by production drawings and a sculpture. Edmée Lepercq reviews Hardeep Pandhal's solo exhibition at Cubitt.

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Actions. The image of the world can be different

Installation view, Rana Begum

Kettle's Yard in Cambridge re-opens following a multi-million pound redevelopment of its galleries and public spaces and takes this question, and its possible answers, as a starting point. It features the work of 38 practitioners whose works fill the galleries, the on-site historic house and a nearby church, as well as occupying space online and being emblazoned on the uniform of the front of house staff. This exhibition is expansive. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Maureen Paley, 21 Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Kaye Donachie: Silent As Glass

Kaye Donachie, Silent As Glass, exhibition view, Maureen Paley, London 2018

Over the course of her career, Donachie’s work has developed from group depictions of nymph-like youths in a variety of natural settings, including campfires and caves, and hinting at tribal undertones in warm earthy colours, to the caged, closely framed portraits of women in domestic surroundings, even if these are only suggested, we see today. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming

Installation view of Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming, Camden Arts Centre, 2018.

Rhythm defines Giorgio Griffa’s work. Throughout the Camden Arts Centre’s gallery spaces, from his earliest, late 1960s work to his more recent output, his bright, repeated gestures mark the raw canvases in sequences and patterns. The rhythmic quality is emphasised by the folds of his unstretched canvases, starkly visible, which segment the surfaces of the paintings into something like a score. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Thomas Bock and Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate

James and Henry Barnard

The first UK-exhibition dedicated to the work of the Birmingham-born convict artist, Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855), at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, is paired with the concurrent exhibition, Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate. This was the the result of a three-year residency spent by the artist at HMP Grendon – Europe’s only entirely therapeutic prison. Despite widely differing careers they both viscerally remind us of the dangers of denying any person a sense of identity. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Cass Sculpture Foundation, New Barn Hill, Goodwood, West Sussex PO18 0QP

The Sleeping Procession

CASS Projects: The Sleeping Procession exhibition. Curated by Sean Steadman and Gabriel Hartley

‘The Sleeping Procession’, a bright and upbeat group exhibition curated by emerging artists Gabriel Hartley and Sean Steadman occupies the gallery with ease. It is a jovial gathering, inspired by the Foundation’s archive of maquettes which the pair have put in dialogue with works by their peers and a number of artists whose work they have found influential. Review by Rebecca Partridge

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Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre, Gibbet Hill Rd, Coventry CV4 7AL

Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

Installation view, Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

The internet and advertising provide us with a constant barrage of images. In the face of this mass it can be hard to find meaning. Clare Woods' current exhibition at Mead Gallery is a direct refusal of this position. She presents only a handful of works to allow us a clarity of vision which is incredibly refreshing. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Chiba City Museum of Art: 3 Chome-10-8 Chuo, Chiba, Chiba Prefecture 260-0013, Japan

Tsuyoshi Ozawa: Imperfection: Parallel Art History

Imperfection

Tsuyoshi Ozawa not only interrogates modern Japanese art history, illuminating the unique and sometimes odd pathways it has taken, he also questions the acts of looking and showing. He is distinct from Takashi Murakami, who proudly proclaimed the value of forgotten history by pushing anime-like figures to the forefront. Ozawa keeps an unstable and ambiguous position, enjoying the diverse and imaginative visions sustained by his perspicacity and sense of humour. Review by Kodama Kanazawa

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Michael Armitage: The Chapel

Michael Armitage, The Chapel, installation view at the South London Gallery, 2017.

Following on from his excellent show in summer 2017 at Turner Contemporary with this exhibition of eight new paintings, Michael Armitage stakes a strong claim to being the leading figurative painter of the group that has emerged from London art schools in the last decade. Review by Piers Masterson

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National Galleries of Scotland, 73 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DS

NOW | Susan Philipsz, Michael Armitage, Yto Barrada, Kate Davis, Hiwa K, Sarah Rose

Seven Tears, 2016

NOW is the second in a six-part series of exhibitions presented by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art exploring the work of international contemporary artists. It is dominated by a 5 room display of works by the artist Susan Philipsz alongside works by renowned artists Kate Davis, Sarah Rose, Hiwa K, Michael Armitage and Yto Barrada. Review by Rosie Priest

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014, USA

Laura Owens

Untitled, 2015 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York)

The Whitney Museum of American Art has historically positioned itself in the public imagination as an incontrovertible arbiter of taste, the sort of claim that makes its stale, self-consciously presentist choices all the more discouraging. As such, the Laura Owens retrospective currently on view feels less like the mid-career survey of a serious painter and more like an overblown Instagram backdrop, a pandering move that undercuts Owens’ contributions and reasserts the Whitney’s distance from artistic innovation. Review by Torey Akers

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Museumpark 18-20, 3015 CX Rotterdam, Netherlands

Academy of Tal R

Academy of Tal R Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

As seen in Tal R's mid-career retrospective, Academy of Tal R, currently at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, he tends to work in series and employs intermittently recurring motifs yet his subject matter, compositional arrangements and application of materials evidences an approach that is anything but doctrinaire. Review by John Gayer

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Rose Wylie: Quack Quack

 Rose Wylie, Installation view, Quack Quack, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London

Rose Wylie’s paintings have previously been dismissed as ‘childish’. Her forms are decisive, irreverent, lucid; facial expressions are often reduced to a mere few brushstrokes. In this way, her paintings are, in fact, childhood remembered and rendered exactly as it exists for us as adults – as hazy fragments, as depictions not just of events or places, but of how it felt to be there. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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