Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London, NW1 5DA

Mary Corse

Mary Corse, installation view, Lisson Gallery London, May 2018

Mary Corse’s first major UK show at Lisson Gallery, London, is as much a scientific inquiry as it is art. Newtonian science extracts emotion from the situations it is used to examine, the same, by extension, could be said of its strange alter ego quantum mechanics. Review by Matthew Turner

Further reading +

Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art (Modern One), 75 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DR

Jenny Saville: Trace

JENNY SAVILLE  Olympia, 2013 - 2014  Charcoal and oil on canvas, 217 x 290 cm copyright Jenny Saville.  Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian

Jenny Saville’s paintings have always explored the insistence of corporeal mass, the fleshiness of flesh...

Further reading +

Mother's Tankstation, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Maria Farrar: Eaves Deep

Dresser

Though it appears brittle, the Greyhound is strong and quick, its structure contradicts its force. Similarly with Maria Farrar’s paintings, lines become not just convenient structure, but a directional thing-in-itself. Review by Alex Bennett

Further reading +

National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire, and Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire

The Course of Empire: The Savage State

Looking at some of Cole’s earliest American landscape paintings, made after his move to New York from Philadelphia in 1825, the contrast is arresting. The Edenic quality of his scenery is hard to miss. There’s a quiet stillness to paintings like ‘View of the Round-Top in the Catskill Mountains’ (1827), in which the landscapes seem both fresh and undisturbed; not only are they new to Cole – and “new to Art”, as he writes in his journal – but they seem somehow newly created, as if the painting’s mists were rising from a just-finished topography. Review by Rowland Bagnall

Further reading +

Handel Street Projects, 14 Florence Street, London N1 2DX

Graham Gussin: The Mary Jane Paintings

Graham Gussin: The Mary Jane Paintings installation view

Graham Gussin’s The Mary Jane Paintings are illegal. They aren’t illegal in the same way that the art market is increasingly criminal, such as how the sale of da Vinci’s Salvador Mundi was called ‘the biggest art fraud in history’ or how works of art featured heavily in the Panama Papers as vehicles for tax evasion and other financial crimes. Instead, they are directly illegal; made from hashish that has been ground down, mixed with linseed oil and applied to linen and paper. Review by Matthew Turner

Further reading +

Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art, Witte de Withstraat 50, 3012 BR Rotterdam, Netherlands

Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition

Irene Kopelman, 77 Colors of a Volcanic Landscape A, B, C (2016) and Puzzle Piece (2012) part of Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art 2018

Stepping into Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, lands one in an ambiguously sparse installation filled with plenty of air and light. Here it takes time to adjust to the presentation’s scope, as some of the works offer bare whispers of visual information that are delicately precise representations that cannot be grasped in a few milliseconds. Review by John Gayer

Further reading +

Plymouth Arts Centre, 38 Looe St, Plymouth PL4 0EB and Plymouth College of Art, Tavistock Pl, Plymouth PL4 8AT 

History Painting: Rose Wylie

History Painting: Rose Wylie installation view

It seems near impossible to refer to the style of a Rose Wylie painting without mentioning the word childlike. Even on canvas, brush-strokes and mixes of paint still carry the instinctive childlike motion of the impulsive hand that struck them there. Review by Eva Szwarc

Further reading +

Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford, England

America’s Cool Modernism

Le Tournesol (The Sunflower)

Above all, in America’s Cool Modernism at the Ashmolean Museum, the absence of human presence in the artworks betrays an anxiety towards the place of people in an increasingly mechanised world. I found myself thinking about the photographs of Detroit that surfaced several years ago, showing the derelict buildings and factories that remain in the wake of the city’s bankruptcy. Review by Rowland Bagnall

Further reading +

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Charlemont House, Parnell Square North, Dublin 1, D01 F2X9, Ireland

Amanda Dunsmore: Keeper

Amanda Dunsmore, John Hume, 2005; installation view, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

In light of seismic political events, and the failed attempts to square the circle that is the Irish Border, Amanda Dunsmore’s exhibition ‘Keeper’ in Dublin’s Hugh Lane seems increasingly vital and brings the Good Friday Agreement into sharper focus. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Rd, London NW3 6DG

Sadie Benning: Sleep Rock

Hotel Fashion

When I first saw Sadie Benning’s ground-breaking ‘cut and paste’ video work in the early 1990s, with their cool soundtracks and deadpan narrations, it was clear that here was an artist who was ahead of their time and whose influence can be seen in practices from Mark Leckey to Heather Phillipson. For their first solo exhibition in London, Benning presents new work that continues their interest in autobiography and found imagery which now finds form through a filmic sequence of paintings and collages. Review by Piers Masterson

Further reading +

Stephen Friedman Gallery 25-28 Old Burlington Street London W1S 3AN

Andreas Eriksson: Kria

installation view

Stephen Friedman Gallery is delighted to present Swedish artist Andreas Eriksson's third solo exhibition at the gallery: ‘Kria'. Living and working in Lidköping, Sweden, he is known for the unique way he examines nature and the history of painting to illustrate the quiet beauty that underscores everyday life.

Further reading +

The approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Evren Tekinoktay: Serpentine

Evren Tekinoktay,Serpentine, Installation view

The overall aesthetic of the current exhibition, ‘Serpentine’, is remarkably conservative. The collages appear to be simple cut-outs; I stare at them, and they freeze. The lines, corners and edges form sharp patterns through the gallery wall; and they are softened by the pale colours outlining and filling the shapes. Review by Carolina Mostert

Further reading +

Cubitt, 8 Angel Mews, London N1 9HH

Hardeep Pandhal: Liar Hydrant

Hardeep Pandhal, Liar Hydrant Mood Board detail, Cubitt Gallery, 2018.

The video works layer lurid cartoons, psychedelic narratives and deadpan rap music; they are accompanied by production drawings and a sculpture. Edmée Lepercq reviews Hardeep Pandhal's solo exhibition at Cubitt.

Further reading +