Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Towner Art Gallery, Devonshire Park, College Rd, Eastbourne BN21 4JJ

Phoebe Unwin: Iris

Phoebe Unwin, Iris. Installation view at Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne. 2018. Image Rob Harris. Courtesy Towner Art Gallery.

The fifteen, light-infused works that make up London-based painter Phoebe Unwin’s exhibition at Towner Art Gallery give the impression of the snatched in-between moments of life that work together to create memories. The exhibition’s title, ‘Iris’, takes its name from the artist’s late grandmother but it also nods to the workings of the eye as light, atmosphere and objects take their effect on our senses. Review by Clare Robson

Further reading +

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Abandoibarra Etorb., 2, 48009 Bilbo, Bizkaia, Spain

Gerhard Richter: Seascapes

Seascape

As you enter the top floor gallery that houses the exhibition: ‘Gerhard Richter: Seascapes’ at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, you would be forgiven for feeling a sudden melancholic jolt. Review by William Davie

Further reading +

Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold, Installation view, 6 June - 8 September 2019, Serpentine Galleries

As I walk through the Serpentine Gallery’s retrospective of her 50-year career I can’t get Faith Ringgold, the person, out of my mind. The works on display, despite many of them depicting horrific scenes of physical and social violence; the riots that took place during the civil rights era of 1950s and 60s America; gender inequality; the Black Power movement and the manipulation of black bodies in white consumer-capitalist culture, are permeated with the same warmth and affirmative energy that emanates from the artist in her interviews. This is an unusual brand of ‘political’ art; the works are critical, incisive and defiant, yet the tone remains warm and positive, even joyful - much like the artist herself. Review by India Nielsen

Further reading +

Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, Soho, London W1F 9JJ

Callum Innes: Keeping Time

Installation view, Callum Innes: Keeping Time

When entering Frith Street Gallery, there is an initial risk of misunderstanding Callum Innes’ work. A visitor could easily glance at the paintings here, determine them to be simple and flat, and they could walk away. However, Innes’ pieces function almost like impressionist works - only up-close do his markings and layers become apparent, and you suddenly become aware that each piece is an arrangement of layers and brushstrokes on a canvas, each possessing different finishes and textures. Review by Lois Morton

Further reading +

Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Rd, Bermondsey, London SE16 4DF

Dean Kenning: Psychobotanical

Dean Kenning, Psychobotanical, 2019, installation view

The centrepiece of Dean Kenning’s new show ‘Psychobotanical’ is ‘Untitled (Rubber Plant)’, a kinetic sculpture made of silicon. On a waist-high plinth, two perfectly white, tendrilled sculptures are motorised to interact with each other in a way which seems both random and imbued with human gesture – somewhere between the wavy wind-sock creatures you see outside MOT garages and a gallery-friendly ‘Day Of The Triffids’. Review by Lucy Holt

Further reading +

TACO!, 30 Poplar Place, Thamesmead, London SE28 8BA

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?, installation view, TACO!

The current exhibition ‘Can You Feel It?’ explores the polaric feelings of euphoria and loss which surround 90s rave culture and its legacy. Artist Joe Cheetham, known primarily for his works on canvas, has here created a gallery-spanning wall mural which depicts a number of beano-on-ecstasy style cartoon characters, straight from the pages of Viz magazine. Review by Amy Jones

Further reading +

Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, No. 145, DLF South Court Mall, Shaheed Pankaj Juyal Marg, Saket District Centre, Saket, New Delhi, Delhi 110017, India

Arpita Singh: Six Decades of Painting

Whatever is Here

The Kiran Nadar Museum of Arts presents the first ever retrospective of one of India’s most significant female artists, Arpita Singh. Review by Pranamita Borgohain

Further reading +

Kettle's Yard, Castle Street, Cambridge, CB3 0AQ

Oscar Murillo: Violent Amnesia

Oscar Murillo, Violent Amnesia, 2019. Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge

“No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” Oscar Murillo’s current exhibition at Kettle’s Yard starts with these words by John Donne. This quote is a testimony of the artist’s mourning for his friend, Nigerian curator and unique contributor to the art world, Okwui Enwezor, who died earlier this year. But it makes me think that if Murillo were an island, he would have been a floating island. Review by Gulnaz Can

Further reading +

Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Mandy El-Sayegh: Cite Your Sources

Mandy El-Sayegh, Cite Your Sources (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019.

Verbal language dominates and hits you like a wave; pages from the Financial Times are pasted up the gallery walls and underfoot; silk-screened advertising copy, schematics and Arabic calligraphy are layered on top of maps, passport-photocopies, grids and each other. Review by India Nielsen

Further reading +

Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Krymsky Val, 9 строение 32, Moskva, Russia, 119049

Pavel Pepperstein: The Human as a Frame for the Landscape

Pavel Pepperstein, The Human as a Frame for the Landscape, installation view, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, 2019

The work of Pavel Pepperstein is, to western audiences, often impenetrable — not least because it often relies upon references to in-jokes and Russian-Language text. Pepperstein is interested in exploding-out historical moments and psychedelic experiences and picking through the debris. He’s called it “the spiritual backstage”. Review by Lucy Holt

Further reading +

MK Gallery, 900 Midsummer Blvd, Milton Keynes MK9 3QA

The Lie of the Land

The Crowning

Milton Keynes is quite unlike any other place in the UK. A new, modernist town built in the 1960s to provide somewhere to live for people who worked in London. A town built out of concrete, marble and glass. A town built on a grid. A few decades later the place became known as a haven for various subcultures; ravers, skateboarders and boy racers all flocked to the town, youthful rebellion disrupting the grid. Review by Ryan Hughes

Further reading +

Bloc Projects, 71 Eyre Lane, Sheffield S1 4RB

Joy Labinjo: As We Were

Untitled

Six vividly-coloured paintings hang in the exhibition space at Bloc Projects, a small artist-led gallery in Sheffield presenting an entirely new body of work by British-Nigerian artist Joy Labinjo. Most focus on an individual or two against a bright, opaque background; the paintings are large, smooth and confident in their application, and bold and graphic in their style. Review by Clare Robson

Further reading +