Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstraße 7, 10963 Berlin

The Garden of Earthly Delights

Homo sapiens sapiens

Taking its point of departure and title from Hieronymus Bosch’s ‘Garden of Earthly Delights’ (1490-1510), the current exhibition at Gropius Bau brings together the wide-ranging work of twenty international artists. The state of the garden serves as a microcosmic starting point, from which expansive ideas and wider dialogues emerge about colonialism, systems of sharing, borders and structures of thought. With contributing artists including Yayoi Kusama, Pipilotti Rist, Hicham Berrada and more, the exhibition moves from the paradisiacal to the provocative, the reflective to the revolutionary, and shifts between global and individual lenses. Review by Eva Szwarc

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The Modern Institute, 14-20 Osborne St, Glasgow G1 5QN, Scotland

Simon Starling: ‘A-A’, B-B’’

Manual Transmission

Two exhibits across the European continent linking together a narrative built over three centuries. An eighth of a Venetian painting, half a car, two Noh masks, a photograph of a pedigree; between original and representation, masquerade and deception, ‘A-A’; B-B’’ reflects on the power of curation to alter audience perception. Review by Elaine Y.J Zheng

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Kudzanai-Violet Hwami: (15,952km) via Trans-Sahara Hwy N1

Kudzanai-Violet Hwami, Family Portrait, 2017 acrylic and oil on canvas 2 panels.

Each painting is thought of as an overlap of narratives, stories and representations of black bodies in many forms. In so doing, Hwami is addressing her ideas and ideals of her own family and her roots, as well as the legacies of colonialism. Review by Melissa Chemam

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Maurice and Paul Marciano Art Foundation, 4357 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90010, USA

Donna Huanca: Obsidian Ladder

Installation view of Donna Huanca: OBSIDIAN LADDER.

Donna Huanca’s ‘Obsidian Ladder’ is purposefully discomfiting, and almost too visceral and sensual to be absorbed fully in one go. Once you enter the cavernous main gallery of the Marciano Art Foundation, Huanca’s multimedia installation of paintings, sculpture, performance, sound, and scent threaten to overwhelm your senses. The combination makes for an unnerving, unsettling experience that ostensibly explores femininity and gender, but whose impact only comes across as such when you know the whole context of the work and can appreciate the importance of its site. Review by Deborah Krieger

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Irish Museum of Modern Art, Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Military Rd, Kilmainham, Dublin 8, Ireland

Kim Gordon: She bites her tender mind

Proposal For A Dance (still)

Kim Gordon first came to prominence in the mid-80s as a member of the noise band Sonic Youth - co-founded with her ex-husband Thurston Moore and active until 2011, when both the band and marriage dissolved. Since then Gordon has become a polymath: releasing music from several projects, embarking on an acting career, writing the acclaimed ‘Girl in a Band’ memoir on her years in Sonic Youth, and focusing on her visual art practice that took a backseat during her tenure with the band. It is this last category that sees us drawn to Dublin’s Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) to see Gordon’s latest exhibition ‘She bites her tender mind’. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014, USA

Whitney Biennial 2019

Tete d'Homme

The 2017 edition of the Whitney Biennial is remembered for the animated debate surrounding the inclusion of a controversial painting by Dana Schutz titled ‘Open Casket’ (2016). It spurred an open discussion about cultural appropriation, white privilege and freedom of creativity. It divided much of the art world and prompted a discussion panel with The Racial Imaginary Institute titled ‘Perspectives on Race and Representation.’ The painting ultimately remained. Despite the best intensions of curators Jane Panetta and Rujeko Hockley, this year’s Whitney Biennial wallows yet again in controversy. Review by Anaïs Castro

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Towner Art Gallery, Devonshire Park, College Rd, Eastbourne BN21 4JJ

Phoebe Unwin: Iris

Phoebe Unwin, Iris. Installation view at Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne. 2018. Image Rob Harris. Courtesy Towner Art Gallery.

The fifteen, light-infused works that make up London-based painter Phoebe Unwin’s exhibition at Towner Art Gallery give the impression of the snatched in-between moments of life that work together to create memories. The exhibition’s title, ‘Iris’, takes its name from the artist’s late grandmother but it also nods to the workings of the eye as light, atmosphere and objects take their effect on our senses. Review by Clare Robson

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Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Abandoibarra Etorb., 2, 48009 Bilbo, Bizkaia, Spain

Gerhard Richter: Seascapes

Seascape

As you enter the top floor gallery that houses the exhibition: ‘Gerhard Richter: Seascapes’ at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, you would be forgiven for feeling a sudden melancholic jolt. Review by William Davie

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold, Installation view, 6 June - 8 September 2019, Serpentine Galleries

As I walk through the Serpentine Gallery’s retrospective of her 50-year career I can’t get Faith Ringgold, the person, out of my mind. The works on display, despite many of them depicting horrific scenes of physical and social violence; the riots that took place during the civil rights era of 1950s and 60s America; gender inequality; the Black Power movement and the manipulation of black bodies in white consumer-capitalist culture, are permeated with the same warmth and affirmative energy that emanates from the artist in her interviews. This is an unusual brand of ‘political’ art; the works are critical, incisive and defiant, yet the tone remains warm and positive, even joyful - much like the artist herself. Review by India Nielsen

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Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, Soho, London W1F 9JJ

Callum Innes: Keeping Time

Installation view, Callum Innes: Keeping Time

When entering Frith Street Gallery, there is an initial risk of misunderstanding Callum Innes’ work. A visitor could easily glance at the paintings here, determine them to be simple and flat, and they could walk away. However, Innes’ pieces function almost like impressionist works - only up-close do his markings and layers become apparent, and you suddenly become aware that each piece is an arrangement of layers and brushstrokes on a canvas, each possessing different finishes and textures. Review by Lois Morton

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Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Rd, Bermondsey, London SE16 4DF

Dean Kenning: Psychobotanical

Dean Kenning, Psychobotanical, 2019, installation view

The centrepiece of Dean Kenning’s new show ‘Psychobotanical’ is ‘Untitled (Rubber Plant)’, a kinetic sculpture made of silicon. On a waist-high plinth, two perfectly white, tendrilled sculptures are motorised to interact with each other in a way which seems both random and imbued with human gesture – somewhere between the wavy wind-sock creatures you see outside MOT garages and a gallery-friendly ‘Day Of The Triffids’. Review by Lucy Holt

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TACO!, 30 Poplar Place, Thamesmead, London SE28 8BA

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?, installation view, TACO!

The current exhibition ‘Can You Feel It?’ explores the polaric feelings of euphoria and loss which surround 90s rave culture and its legacy. Artist Joe Cheetham, known primarily for his works on canvas, has here created a gallery-spanning wall mural which depicts a number of beano-on-ecstasy style cartoon characters, straight from the pages of Viz magazine. Review by Amy Jones

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