Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Lodos gallery, García Icazbalceta #30, Colonia San Rafael Mexico City, Mx. 06470

Korakrit Arunanondchai

Installation View

Lodos presents Korakrit Arunanondchai's first exhibition in Mexico and Latin America. The show features a single piece installation which houses his recent video 'Painting with History in a Room Filled With People With Funny Names 3.'

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Vito Schnabel Gallery, Via Maistra 37, 7500 St. Moritz, Switzerland

Walter Robinson: The Americans

Installation view, Walter Robinson, The Americans, Vito Schnabel Gallery, St. Moritz, 2017

"Robinson’s exploitations of pop imagery succeed by failing the Pictures Generation shibboleth of ironic detachment. In his paintings, the louche sexual glamour of penny dreadfuls and the temptations of booze and junk food are palpable—only the more so, nostalgically, now that the artist is abstemious. Robinson is a Manet of hot babes and a Morandi of McDonald’s French fries and Budweiser beer cans, magnetized by his subjects as he devotes his brush to generic painterly description." – Peter Schjeldahl, "A Man-About-Downtown Gets His Due," The New Yorker, September 26, 2016

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Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 & 11 Duke Street St, London SW1Y 6BN

Cecily Brown: Madrepora

Cecily Brown, Madrepora, 2016. Installation view Thomas Dane Gallery, London.

Powerful and erotic imagery is embedded within the painted skins of Cecily Brown's work. Piers Masterson reviews her solo exhibition 'Madrepora', Brown's first at Thomas Dane's St. James' gallery.

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Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, 6 Heddon Street, London W1B 4BT

Ayan Farah: Maps

Ayan Farah, Maps, installation view, Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London, 2016

Farah's paintings stitch together personal histories, techniques, materials and diverse frames of reference, all underscored by the history, geography and politics of ownership, gender, labour and production. Review by Anneka French

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Rue des Sablons 6, 1205 Genève

Yves Zurstrassen

Exhibition view, Yves Zurstrassen, Galerie Xippas, Geneva, Switzerland, 2017

Yves Zurstrassen’s work is always moving, going from lyrical abstraction to abstract expressionism and vice versa. The Belgian artist develops a singular creating process and uses a very particular technique that reflects the desire to go beyond temporality.

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James Fuentes, 55 Delancey Street, New York, NY 10002

Jessica Dickinson: ARE: FOR + remainders

Jessica Dickinson: ARE: FOR + remainders installation view 2017

Jessica Dickinson’s work in her current exhibition, ARE: FOR + remainders, currently on view at James Fuentes, New York, focuses on the sensations of time, light, and matter within shifting philosophical, perceptual and psychological states. Working with oil paint and various tools on a plaster-like ground, various additive and subtractive actions of countering speeds and pressures are layered, from repetitive marking to aggressive chiseling. These procedures draw their direction from a specific period and poetic sequence of events, where abrupt change is intertwined within daily time.

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Capitain Petzel, Karl-Marx-Allee 45, 10178 Berlin

Sarah Morris: Cloak and Dagger

Metropolis

The second solo exhibition by Sarah Morris at Capitain Petzel, Berlin, Cloak and Dagger, sees a new and recent films and paintings examine the fictional, internal and external architectural landscape inhabited by Fritz Lang who directed the film noir classic, Cloak and Dagger, from which the exhibition gets its title.

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Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 25 Arthur St, Edinburgh, EH6 5DA

You hardboiled     I softboiled

Installation view, You hardboiled I softboiled, Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 2017 (Valerie Norris, Music for Intelligent Young Ladies (2013), and, bedroom furniture (2013)).

In this intriguingly titled and intimately composed exhibition, ideas of how love and its stories might be practiced, sought and appropriated move between the published page and spoken word, and are heard through sound and audio. Love is also framed within filmed moments and presented in painted gestures; it is seen in close proximity and recognised across vast distances. The love stories described here are sensed in places, portraits, correspondences and spectres. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Bosse & Baum, Unit BGC, Bussey Building, 133 Rye Lane, SE15 4ST

Florence Peake: WE perform I am in love with my body

Florence Peake, installation view, WE Perform I am in love with my body, 2017, Bosse & Baum.

Florence Peake’s show at Bosse & Baum, ‘WE perform I am in love with my body,’ comes as close to dance – as close to performance – as you can get. The pieces are so connected with the body, physicality and movement that you just can’t get away from it. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Ydessa Hendeles: The Milliner’s Daughter

Ydessa Hendeles, detail from THE BIRD THAT MADE THE BREEZE TO BLOW (Aero-Car No. 500), 2011. Automaton sculpture with key, displayed in mahogany-and-glass vitrine, 511 x 253 x 369 cm.

In her solo show currently on at The Power Plant, Ydessa Hendeles performs the simultaneous roles of collector, curator and artist. ‘The Milliner’s Daughter’ is a complex exhibition showcasing Hendeles’ interest in fables and stories. Her work investigates how narratives, from cultural narratives to fairy tales, inform our individual and collective identities and structure our perceptions of the world. Emma Rae Warburton reviews

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

CONGLOMERATE: Station ID

CONGLOMERATE, Still from Desde el Jardin, directed by Sol Calero and Dafna Maimon, 2016.

An elaborate installation is the ‘absurdly complicated’ stage-set for the newest piece of ‘Gesamkunstwerk’ by Berlin-based artist collective CONGLOMERATE, presented at Tenderpixel as their first London-based project. The group comprises a core squadron of 5 artists and filmmakers including Sol Calero, Ethan Hayes-Chute, Derek Howard, Christopher Kline and Dafna Maimon, converging and disbanding at will in different cities and contexts in order to produce 30-minute ‘Blocks’ of programming that make a mess of traditional genres. Review by Alice Bucknell

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Turner Contemporary, Rendezvous, Margate, Kent CT9 1HG

Michael Armitage and Phyllida Barlow: Every Day is a New Day

Phyllida Barlow, installation view, Turner Contemporary

‘Every Day is a New Day’ is comprised of two solo shows, and as such comparisons are inevitable. Different as the work of Phyllida Barlow and Michael Armitage are – in medium, in scale, in cultural and social preoccupations – it is difficult to get away from the sense that one is being led through a critical narrative. Review by Benedict Hawkins

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Olga Korper Gallery, 17 Morrow Avenue Toronto M6R 2H9, Canada

Paterson Ewen

Installation view, Paterson Ewen, Olga Korper Gallery

Apart from a single lithographic print, the exhibition presents pieces that were all produced during the 1990s, and together they powerfully illustrate the artist’s interest in space, astronomy, cosmic events, and the phenomenal relationship between our physical world and the celestial environment that surrounds it. Review by Emma Rae Warburton

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