Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire OX20 1PP

Michelangelo Pistoletto

Terzo Paradiso/Third Paradise

Oscar Gaynor reviews a large scale exhibition of works by Michelangelo Pistoletto inserted into the opulent interiors and exteriors of Blenheim Palace.

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1F 9DY

Giuseppe Penone: Fui, Sarò, Non Sono (I was, I will be, I am not)

Installation view at Marian Goodman Gallery

The title of Giuseppe Penone’s show at Marian Goodman – ‘Fui, Sarò, Non Sono, or I was, I will be, I am not’ – plays off the theme of growth and change. Sculptures and drawings, mainly of trees, are twisted, moulded and developed throughout the space, assuming a new identity. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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Maureen Paley, 21 Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Olivia Plender

Exhibition view: Maureen Paley, London 2016. Empire City: The World on One Street, architectural model, 19.7 x 150 x 119.9 cm, 2009. Britannia Receiving Her Newest Institution, hand-embroidered banner and wooden beam, 252 x 149 cm, 2012.

Piers Masterson reviews a solo exhibition of works by Olivia Plender that bring together a number of perspectives on historical and contemporary political agendas.

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The Java Project, 252 Java Street, Brooklyn NY 11222

Ian Giles: Common Room

Common room, Installation view

For the length of his exhibition at The Java Project Ian Giles converts the gallery into a semi-functional space, a place for groups to meet and activities to be played out. The gallery which is housed within a studio complex will be utilised for a series of events including a one off Movie Club, artist critique groups and a closing event which will include Giles’ interactive performance Clay Meditation.

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Nama Āto: Japanese Outsider Art

Nama Āto: Japanese Outsider Art at Tramway, 2016

If Namo Āto proves anything, it’s that we need to see more work by artists with learning disabilities in mainstream contexts, whether it’s perceived as 'Outsider Art' or not. Review by Joe Turnbull

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London, SE1 0LN

Jerwood Drawing Prize 2016

Installation view, Jerwood Drawing Prize 2016, Jerwood Visual Arts

Phoebe Cripps reviews the Jerwood Drawing Prize 2016, the largest annual open exhibition for UK-based artists. The Prize celebrates the breadth of drawing practice and creates new dialogues about the continued relevance of drawing in an increasingly diverse and digitally-led age.

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Stills Centre for Photography, 23 Cockburn Street, Edinburgh EH1 1BP

Jo Spence

‘Jo Spence' The Polysnappers, Family, Fantasy & Photography, (1981). Installation view at Stills, 2016

Spence’s photographs remain shockingly relevant to current debates about care, education and a consideration of art’s autonomous or social function. Review by Victoria Horne

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L. Kanellopoulos Arts Centre, 37 Dragoumi str., 19200 Eleusis Greece

Latitudes | Humanscapes

Carlo Gianferro in Latitudes | Humanscapes

Eleusis 2021 European Capital of Culture – Candidate City in collaboration with Aeschylia Festival 2016 proudly presents the group exhibition Latitudes | Humanscapes curated by Dr. Kostas Prapoglou featuring the work of seven artists, photographers and cinematographers under the theme of contemporary Romania.

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Various locations, Bristol

Bristol Biennial 2016: In Other Worlds

Liquid Presence

Bristol Biennial 2016 presents thirteen new commissions on the theme of ‘In Other Worlds’. This otherness took many forms: human to non-human, present to future; from the city streets to the very air we breathe. A series of exhibitions, talks, events and satellite projects encourage encounters with, conversations on and explorations of an array of alchemically transformed locations across the city. Review by Kate Self

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The Modern Institute, Aird’s Lane, Glasgow

Nicolas Party: Three Cats

Three Cats, 2016 Pastel on canvas 135 x 150 x 7 cm 53.1 x 59.1 x 2.8 in

For his second solo exhibition at The Modern Institute, Nicolas Party has transformed the Aird’s Lane space into an interior populated with temporary walls and murals meticulously rendered to resemble marble and malachite in the manner of trompe l’oeil. This scenery creates a faux-classical setting to present Party’s new body of pastels on canvas.

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BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA

The Playground Project

http://www.balticmill.com

‘The Playground Project’ at BALTIC seeks to put the subversive back into play. The exhibition, first staged at Kunsthalle, Zürich, reconnects us with the playground’s historical connections to social activism and utopian thinking. Review by Elly Thomas

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Djanogly Gallery, Nottingham Lakeside Arts, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD

Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva: Making Beauty

Installation view of Fragility, 2015, Djanogly Gallery

Hadzi-Vasileva works across a range of mediums, from sculpture, installation and architectural intervention, to video, photography and sound. Her recent sculptural and sound works, some of which are still works-in-progress, elaborate on her exploration of the artistic possibilities of scientific research. Review by Cassie Davies

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Komplot, Chaussée de Forest, 90 Vorstse Steenweg, 1060 Brussels

Dreamworks

Composition with bench, flowers and mirror, wooden bench, Harry Potter Mirror of Erised cast-iron replica, recycled cardboard box, polystyrene, flowers, 2016

Fenêtreproject is the name of Paris-based artist and curatorial duo, Francesca Mangion and Dustin Cauchi. For their first show in Brussels, they set out to explore the role of economic immanence on hopes, expectations and aesthetics.

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Stuart Shave/Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

Nicolas Deshayes: Thames Water

Nicolas Deshayes, Thames Water, Modern Art, 1-24 September, exhibition view

'Thames Water' continues Deshayes' idiosyncratic use of industrial materials and processes by positioning cast iron sculptures that function as radiators around the perimeter of the gallery. Review by William Rees

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