Sean Kelley 475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Alec Soth | A Pound of Pictures

Niagara Falls, Ontario

Sean Kelly is delighted to announce A Pound of Pictures, Alec Soth’s fourth solo exhibition at the gallery. This new body of work brings together images Soth completed between 2018 and 2021. As is often his custom, Soth began A Pound of Pictures by taking a series of road trips, in this case on a quest to further explore a deeper connection between the ephemerality and physicality of photography as a medium.

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Somerset House, London

Beano: The Art of Breaking Rules | Somerset House

Beano: The Art of Breaking The Rules at Somerset House Landscape

First released in 1938 and still crafted weekly from its home in Dundee, Beano has always applied one simple rule - rules should be broken. Set to be a show like no other, this landmark exhibition explores both Beano’s and contemporary art’s unruliness and irreverence, through the eyes of extraordinary artists who embody the Beano spirit of rebellion.

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Dulwich Picture Gallery, Gallery Rd, London SE21 7AD

Helen Frankenthaler: Radical Beauty

Installation view Helen Frankenthaler: Radical Beauty

For many decades after its initial rise, the Abstract Expressionist movement remained synonymous with a distinctive iconography: cue the paint-splattered male, a tragic hero sprawled across the canvas. Although its cast is variously misleading...

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The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Interview with Yuri Pattison - Part Two

Yuri Pattison the engine (installation view), The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin, 2020-2021

December 2020 saw the opening of ‘the engine’, Yuri Pattison’s new exhibition in Dublin’s Douglas Hyde Gallery. This was six months later than originally planned due to the closure of cultural institutions in Ireland during the pandemic. Pattison's ‘the engine' features a new body of work highlighting the vast systems that create and shape the realities of modern existence. The elongated timeframe and continuing impact of the pandemic has resulted in two distinct conversations, which will be published as two distinct texts. Below is a transcript from the second of these phone interviews from 23 December 2020. Interview by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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The Modern Institute, 14-20 Osborne Street, Glasgow G1 5QN

Jesse Wine: Carve a Hole in the Rain for Yer

Meantime

After a fifteen-year commitment to ceramic sculpture, the New-York based British artist, Jesse Wine, has returned to an overarching concern with motion, composition and stasis, where the conviction found in his earlier works is overturned to make space for reflection. Segregated by bright curtains, spread around the Modern Institute, ‘Carve a Hole in The Rain for Yer’ invites a pause stirred by isolation and confinement. With this note of incompletion and self-questioning comes a distancing from the sculptural subject and a closer contemplation on the process of sculpture. Review by Elaine YJ Zheng

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HS Projects, 5 Howick Place, Westminster, London SW1P 1BH

Permindar Kaur: Home

HS Projects - Howick Place - Parmindar Kaur

Permindar Kaur’s exhibitions often create feelings of anxiety. Cuddly toys and nursery room furniture would be given abject twists, kid’s dolls and clothes sporting metal claws or daggers and razor wire cribs would speak to the most Freudian nightmares of threat in the domestic family space. The impact of Kaur’s installations is heightened by having the secluded scenes of English family life played out in an institutional gallery setting, with the subsequent unsettling collision of public and private arenas. Review by Piers Masterson

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Makina Books, London

Rebecca Tamás: Strangers: Essays on the Human and Nonhuman

Last summer, ‘Strangers: Essays on the Human and Nonhuman’ by the poet Rebecca Tamás had a swarm of anticipation around it. Her poetry collection ‘WITCH’ (2019) and her co- editorial role in ‘Spells: 21st Century Occult Poetry’ (2018) had already established the York St John University lecturer as a critically acclaimed writer, crafting a world of linguistic ritual and transformation around her. With these successes behind her, people were buzzing to read Tamás’ five new short prose essays. Through literary strangeness and its many mystic references, the book presents alternative modes of thinking—ways for us to feel reconnected with each other and the plains, wildflowers, seas and forests around us. While this book does, to some extent, hold a place in my heart specifically connected to the hotly political and momentous summer of 2020, it also marks a new standard for arts, literature and contemporary thought, which promotes a more inclusive future. Review by Nina Hanz

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Joya AiR, Parque Natural Sierra María-Los Vélez, Andalucia, Spain

Simon Linington: Bajo la Sierra Larga

Simon Linington: Bajo la Sierra Larga

Growing up on the Isle of Wight, Simon Linington was fascinated by the different coloured sands that made up the cliffs near his childhood home at Alum Bay. Here, new colourful strata would sometimes be dramatically revealed when parts of the cliff-face crumbled due to erosion. As a child, he would fill small glass bottles with layers of the sand, producing the typical tourist souvenirs that are still sold in the area today. These early experiences led Linington to an understanding of material and place as inseparably linked. Review by Anna Souter

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Bobinska Brownlee New River, Canonbury Street, London, N1 2US

Interview with Rae Hicks

New Town

‘Anomaly’ expands and builds on Hicks’ previous preoccupation with the everyday, which he suggests has taken on a different tone since lockdown. His paintings (made in lockdown one) and sculptures (made in lockdown two), feature the same symbols over and over: sun, sky, pylons and city. But the works feel as if they are reiterating a new kind of feeling. There is a suggestion that these idealised structures and symbols around us are in fact what leads us to being susceptible to conspiracy theories; the tight order of our surroundings are settings ripe for myth and ignorance. Interview by Alexander Harding

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Institute of Contemporary Arts, The Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5AH

Interview with Eve Stainton

Dykegeist

Eve Stainton’s dance performances transport audiences to brilliantly enigmatic, sensorial worlds. Anyone lucky enough to have caught ‘Rubby Sucky Forge’ at The Place, London in Autumn 2020 will have experienced a much needed detour from reality—three dancers melting, sparring and succumbing to each other in a futuristic stage ecology of metal and slippery projected visuals.Eve’s upcoming performance ‘Dykegeist’ at the ICA is sure to be just as estranging and endearing. Interview with Louisa Doyle

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Hauser & Wirth Publishing

Luchita Hurtado

Luchita Hurtado and Matt Mullican overlooking the Arizona landscape, 1961

Hurtado’s conversations with Obrist stay true to her character and reveal many of her most admirable traits to the reader. We learn that she was humble and hilarious: at the admirable age of 97, she kept the menu of the Serpentine opening night dinner as a keepsake. She explained to Obrist, “you have to understand, this is one of the happiest days of my life. This will help me remember this wonderful evening once I’m old.” Review by Maximiliane Leuschner

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Bbeyond, online

Recorded Action Web (R-A-W)

R -A-W - Bbeyond - Marina Barsy Aaner - Isil Sol Vil

Bbeyond is dedicated to performance art in all its variety. Established in 2001, the Belfast organisation chooses to complement its regional support of Northern Irish artists with a commitment to fostering dialogue between international communities. Its newest exhibition is ‘Recorded Action Web’ or ‘R-A-W’, which celebrates the organisation’s 20th anniversary. Curated by Sandra Breathnach Corrigan, this online series of performance works continues the organisation’s tradition of international collegiality, featuring artists from a wide variety of countries, including the Ukraine, Spain, Belgium, Germany, and, of course, Ireland. Review by Tom Lordan

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Hauser & Wirth, London

Charles Gaines: Multiples of Nature, Trees and Faces

Numbers and Faces: Multi - Racial/Ethnic Combinations Series 1: Face #11, Martina Crouch (Nigerian Igbo Tribe/White) (detail)

Charles Gaines is a Los Angeles based artist and lecturer who applies systematic and rule-based methods to his unique artistic practice. Gaines’ first solo exhibition in the United Kingdom is currently on view at Hauser & Wirth in London. Due to the ongoing global crisis, Gaines’ show is limited to online viewing. However, it should not be overlooked, as it confronts ideas of race and identity, and raises questions surrounding representation. Across Hauser & Wirth’s galleries on Savile Row are continuations of two ongoing series: ’Numbers & Faces: MultiRacial/Ethnic Combination Series 1’ (1978-) and ‘Numbers & Trees: London Series 1’ (1986-). Gaines’ artistic approach sees systematic colouring combined with overlapping images within a sequenced grid. Review by Sheena Carrington

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