Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, 6 Heddon Street, London W1B 4BT

Painting with Light: The Photography of Ming Smith

Ming Smith, Trio in Gambela, Ethiopia, (1973/2003), archival pigment print, 40.6 x 50.8 c

Smith's photographic style is candid street photography, expressive rather than direct documentation. Embedded within her photographs is emotion, feeling, and life enhanced by the precise colour and light that forms each composition. Review by Sheena Carrington

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Black Lives Matter: A Statement of Support

Black Lives Matter. A Statement of Support. ‘this is tomorrow’ stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. We are saddened by the pain and anger we have seen erupt since the killing of George Floyd, and numerous other black people, by police and other state forces. Part of this frustration comes from the continuing refusal of power structures to create lasting change and represent the society that we would all like to live in: one that is fair, respectful, equal, kind and places no person above the law. When thinking about our editorial approach we are committed to continuing to cover as wide a range of voices of possible but to also build on that by working even harder to cover work that highlights the ongoing fight that marginalised people and groups face. Lastly we would like to more concretely state that we reject racism, fascism in any form, as well as condemning all police and state brutality.

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Nothing gentle will remain: Interviews with Paul Maheke and Naïmé Perrette

Naïmé Perrette, Have you felt that vertigo, when you no longer know what is close?, digital collage, from Tree Landing, with texts by Sara Gianini, 2020

'Nothing gentle will remain' is an online publication that invites artists and audiences to speculate on how we gather together, both now and in the future. The projects’ curators discuss what it means to make work about collective gathering during these unprecedented times with contributing artists Paul Maheke and Naïmé Perrette. Interviewed by Titus Nouwens, Nora Kovacs and William Rees

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Josh Lilley, 40 - 46 Riding House Street, London W1W 7EX

Tom Anholt: Notes on Everything

Tom Anholt, installation view

Anholt is as much a raconteur as a painter. There are not many contemporary artists, or writers for that matter, who can set a scene better. Figures plucked from his reverie traipse across the canvas in technicolour pyjamas like lost sleepwalkers in scenery that resembles a psychedelic underworld. Review by Ted Targett

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Camden Art Centre, Arkwright Rd, London NW3 6DG

The Botanical Mind Online

O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix (screen 1)

‘The Botanical Mind: Art, Mysticism and The Cosmic Tree’ was originally intended to be an in-house group exhibition at Camden Art Centre. Instead, the spread of COVID-19 and the closure of public gallery spaces saw the show move to the digital realm and become ‘The Botanical Mind Online’. The exhibition is hosted at botanicalmind.online, which serves as both the main space to read about the themes and topics of the show, and the central repository for a number of digital offerings, from videos, sound recordings, and podcasts to texts. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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The Tetley, Hunslet Road, Leeds LS10 1JQ

Taus Makhacheva: Hold Your Horses

Taus Makhacheva, ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) Spa, 2018.

When The Tetley gallery in Leeds opened Taus Makhacheva’s exhibition ‘Hold Your Horses’, the world was still aggressively galloping forward. No one knew that in a month’s time the pandemic stasis would impose the idiom’s meaning on life as we know it. Yet, the works included in the exhibition explore several themes that seem to be critical at this point. Review by Jaroslava Tomanova

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The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, Charing Cross, London WC2N 5DN

Backlit: On Visiting The National Gallery, London from Home

Room 11 at The National Gallery, London

Since the lockdown announcement on the 23rd March, galleries and museums across the UK have been emphasising the scope and availability of their digital collections, encouraging the public to engage with high-resolution reproductions of their artefacts online. Considering the work of art in the age of digital reproduction may not be a new phenomenon. And yet, the enthusiasm with which many institutions have been vocalising the accessibility of their archives on the Internet raises the volume on several important questions regarding the significance, if any, of the artwork as a physical, encounterable object, and the responsibility of museums to ensure that their collections are available online. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Odeon of Herodes Atticus, Dionysiou Areopagitou, Athina 105 55, Greece

Dionisis Kavallieratos: Disoriented Dance / Misled Planet

Installation view Disoriented dance / Misled planet, Pitchers

Oh, it feels good to be back looking at art. Standing in the open air of this historic site, Dionisis Kavallieratos’s ‘Disoriented Dance / Misled Planet’ feels like exactly the right show to be seeing at this moment. It’s playful, gentle on the mind and easy on the eye, contemporary, but riffing on ancient themes, challenging, but not too much so. Review by William Summerfield

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Cruising the Dead River: David Wojnarowicz and New York’s Ruined Waterfront

Cover of Cruising the Dead River: David Wojnarowicz and New York's Ruined Waterfront, 2019

In Fiona Anderson’s ‘Cruising the Dead River: David Wojnarowicz and New York’s Ruined Waterfront’ she examines the dilapidated and abandoned piers and warehouses on the waterfront of 1970s/80s New York, considering these places not only as those of queer space but also of queer time; the cruising that occurred within them as preservationist, an activism against the demolishment of queer histories - an archiving of sorts. Review by Tess Charnley

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John Hansard Gallery, 142-144 Above Bar St, Southampton SO14 7DU

David Blandy: How to Fly | How to Live

David Blandy, How to Fly

The current Covid-19 pandemic has thrown the art world into a fight for relevancy that, as galleries and museums have had to close their doors, reveals the limits of their techie expertise. Many face new challenges, but the technophilic, literate, and adept are of course out there. David Blandy is one such case, and two new video works by Blandy, commissioned by John Hansard Gallery, reflect on the current crisis. Review by Stan Portus

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Lundahl & Seitl, online

Symphony of a Missing Room

Symphony of a Missing Room, 2020

The app 'Symphony of a Missing Room' attempts to frame the museum as a site of collective imagination, a palimpsest that stores the voices of its visitors past and present. Based on a guided tour artists Lundahl & Seitl have been staging in galleries for the past 10 years, it allows you to participate in an immersive artwork at home with a friend. Review by Kirsty White

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Galerie Lelong & Co. and P·P·O·W (online)

Irrigation Veins: Ana Mendieta and Carolee Schneemann, Selected Works 1966-1983

Ana Mendieta, Volcán , 1979. Colour photograph, 20.3 x 25.4 cm

Proposed by Carolee Schneemann in the last year of her life, ‘Irrigation Veins: Ana Mendieta & Carolee Schneemann, Selected Works 1966 – 1983’ is a compelling exhibition of two canonical artists who sought to explore their embodied relationship to the land and its history through the body as material. Considering their inclusions in influential essays by Lucy Lippard and Gloria Feman Orenstein, as well as exhibitions at A.I.R. Gallery, the first artist-run gallery for women artists in the United States, it is remarkable that Mendieta and Schneemann have never been placed in direct dialogue. Review by Aileen Dowling

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