Gió Marconi, Via Alessandro Tadino, 20, 20124 Milano

Wade Guyton: Siamo arrivati, in forma abbreviata

iPhones, cameras, computers, consumer-grade Epson printers… American artist Wade Guyton’s practice surrounds the digital universe of our daily lives. Guyton’s process-based approach consists of an apparently simple method, focused on an authorial use of technology. The limitations of a large-format Epson UltraChrome inkjet printer create stutters and miss-fires on his large-scale canvases challenging the notions of painting and photography. Review by Marialuisa Pastò

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Kunstraum, 21 Roscoe St, London EC1Y 8PT

Merike Estna: fragments from the shattered toe

Merike Estna, fragments from the shattered toe, Kunstraum, London, 2017.

Not only do Merike Estna's paintings have colourful, thick lines running erratically across large-scale surfaces, she also makes painting itself seem as playful and effortless as a 1990s computer game. Review by Brenda Guesnet

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

3-Phase

Nicola Singh, Sweet Spot, 2017 – installation view. Commissioned for 3-Phase, a partnership between Jerwood Charitable Foundation, WORKPLACE and Eastside Projects.

For this second edition of '3-Phase', artists Larry Achiampong, Mark Essen and Nicola Singh have been selected by an independent panel to develop and present new works through three exhibition moments. Following the first at Jerwood Space, the artists will exhibit at WORKPLACE Gallery in Gateshead and Eastside Projects in Birmingham in 2018. Review by Giulia Ponzano

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DenFrie, Oslo Pl. 1, 2100 København Ø, Denmark

Hans Op de Beeck: Staging Silence II

Staging Silence II, video still

The subject matter of Staging Silence II, a video work by internationally acclaimed Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck, consists of miniature dioramas depicting deserted scenarios that are built by anonymous hands, working with meticulous precision. There is no plot, no storyline, only empty scenes, where something might happen.

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Bonington Building, Nottingham Trent University, Dryden St, Nottingham NG1 4GG, UK

Sara MacKillop: One Room Living

One Room Living, installation view

One Room Living presents a series of works and interactions that reference the wide variety of spatial uses that directly surround Bonington Gallery – analysing not only the gallery’s site and situation, but also how the wider institution’s function is represented across a multitude of spaces.

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Torbjørn Rødland: The Touch That Made You

Torbjørn Rødland, Bathroom Tiles, 2011-13

In Torbjørn Rødland’s photography activity is stalled. Chemistry is cauterised and left to breathe and rest, surfaces and nubile skins are luminous and lustful, viscosities slip and collaborate. Review by Alex Bennett

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Plymouth Arts Centre, Peninsula Arts, KARST, Plymouth College of Art, The Council House, Plymouth

We The People Are The Work

More Than A Pony Show, Matt Stokes.

A partnership between Plymouth’s major visual arts venues, 'We The People Are The Work' is comprised of five new commissions installed across the city. With each involving varying degrees of collaboration with the city’s inhabitants, at the core of the work is how each artist navigates the complexities of ‘social engagement’. Review by Rowan Lear

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Bergen Kunsthall, Rasmus Meyers allé 5, 5015 Bergen, Norway

Magali Reus: Hot Cottons

Hot Cottons, Installation view

Hot Cottons is Dutch artist Magali Reus’ first solo exhibition in Scandinavia, and her largest solo exhibition to date. The artist creates sculptural objects that are seemingly recognizable, often appropriating the symbolism of ordinary objects from our immediate surroundings. Throughout, there is a flourish of mechanisation relocated to the hand-touched. The result is objects that appear with an unclear, unsteady identity; between the commonplace and the hyper real.

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The Rotunda, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, 1934 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38104, USA

Lisa Hoke: Pie In The Sky

Pie In The Sky, installation view

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art is proud to present New York-based sculptor Lisa Hoke as the third artist in the museum’s Rotunda Projects series. Her installation Pie in the Sky, designed especially for the Brooks’ rotunda, will be completed Wednesday, October 25. Museum visitors are invited to watch Hoke create this dazzlingly colourful and richly textural abstract installation—of plastic cups, cardboard boxes, paper flyers, drink cartons, and molded Styrofoam, all suspended from the rotunda’s dome

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Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, New York, NY 10011

Hayv Kahraman: Re-weaving Migrant Inscriptions

Hayv Kahraman: Re-weaving Migrant Inscriptions installation view 2017

In Re-weaving Migrant Inscriptions at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, Hayv Kahraman’s material treatment of characters is important – pale, nude bodies and homogeneous features contextualize them in the annals of visual history, but while their faces look opaque, their bodies, suspended in the negative space of raw linen, feel ghostly, merely outlining the promise of a form. Review by Torey Akers

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Peles Empire, Karl-Marx-Straße 58, 12043 Berlin, Germany

Shannon Bool: Cathedral/Castle

Installation view

At Peles Empire, Berlin, Shannon Bool’s works address the power of visual representation and manages to challenge authority by means of re-appropriation and exposure to forms once more unfamiliar. Review by Joan Lee

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

States of America

Lee Friedlander, Mt Rushmore, South Dakota, 1969, gelatin-silver print.

Nottingham Contemporary’s ‘States of America’ sweeps across the shifting social and political landscape of the USA between the 1960s and early 1990s, capturing the rise of popular culture and suburbia, declining city centres, the Civil Rights Movement, wealth disparity, urban life and the fading American Dream. Viewed through the lens of seventeen different photographers, we are offered a necessarily prismatic picture of American culture that is particularly compelling given current events. Review by Hannah Newell

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