LADA

LADA Screens: Katherine Araniello

A compilation of greatest hits by the extraordinary artist Katherine Araniello who died in February 2019. Katherine’s work used performance, video and subversive humour in response to the mundane, social awkwardness and the negative representation of disability.

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Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Geta Brătescu: The Power of the Line

Geta Brătescu, Jocul formelor (Game of Forms), 2010, Collage, drawing on paper, 4 parts, 45 x 60 cm

Hauser & Wirth, working closely with the artist before her death and with Ivan Gallery, has put together a museum-quality exhibition of this remarkable artist’s work. The show draws together pieces from the last decade, a period in which Brătescu’s practice focused on working with the line as a structuring principle. Review by Anna Souter

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Hauser & Wirth, Durslade Farm Dropping Lane, Bruton Somerset BA10 0NL

Matthew Day Jackson: Pathetic Fallacy

Installation view, Matthew Day Jackson, Pathetic Fallacy, Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 2019

“Our engagement with nature, to occupy it and to flatten it to a certain extent … That’s the beginning point,” says artist Matthew Day Jackson on his exhibition ‘Pathetic Fallacy’, the result of a months’ residency in Somerset. During his time in England, the American artist had what he described as a mind-blowing experience of the countryside and kept thinking about how space was organised around the human body, nature, architecture and sculpture. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham, NG1 2GB

Elizabeth Price: FELT TIP

Elizabeth Price, KOHL (still), 2018

Elizabeth Price’s solo show at Nottingham Contemporary brings together three new works. Each departs from a moment in late 20th century British history: a period marked by the collapse of the organized Left, the systematic dismantling of union power, and the programmatic reconstitution of the working class. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 4PY

FOCUS: Agnes Martin

FOCUS: Agnes Martin. Installation view, Levy Gorvy, London, 2019.

This is an artist who spent her life in the pursuit of abstract painting: grids and stripes, minimal yet expressive abstractions, imperfect horizontal lines in soft, pastel shades and faint, pencil-drawn grids. A similarly meditative, light-bathed atmosphere pervades the film, and it is a revelation to see Martin’s artistic vision realised in the bread-and-butter reality of the physical landscape. Review by Clare Robson

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Kadist, 19bis/21 rue des Trois Frères, Paris, 75018, France

Affective Utopia

Reynier Leyva Novo, A Thousand and One Times Revolution, 2009-2018, exhibition view Affective Utopia, KADIST, Paris.

Imagining utopia seems to have become the principal task of artists as of late, any speculative, social practice is quickly branded as such. So much so that the title of Kadist’s latest exhibition ‘Affective Utopia’ almost washes past unnoticed. Review by Jessica Saxby

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Locks Gallery, 600 S Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

Sarah McEneaney: Callowhill

Studio

Sarah McEneaney’s painting technique is deceptively simple, reminiscent almost of folk art in its deliberate flatness, bright colours, elevated viewpoint, and attention to surface detail. Review by Deborah Krieger

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FACT, 88 Wood Street, Liverpool, L1 4DQ

Ericka Beckman & Marianna Simnett

Marianna Simnett films (Blood and The Udder)

Ericka Beckman and Marianna Simnett show the human female to be a rebellious creature, a feisty character, courageously challenging the dogma and stereotypical norms of her world. However, they do this in very contrasting ways and herein lies the intrinsic value of this exhibition. Review by Samantha Browne

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone: Webb-Ellis, Richard Whitby

The Lost Ones by Richard Whitby as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone exhibition at Jerwood Space

‘Going, Gone’ is the latest installment of the Jerwood/FVU Awards, and brings us two newly-commissioned films by winning artists Richard Whitby and Webb-Ellis. This year’s work ‘takes Britain’s declared exit from the European Union as a starting point for reflection on other collective experiences of transition and loss. Review by Jack Head

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tracey Emin A Fortnight of Tears

Tracey Emin, A Fortnight of Tears, White Cube Bermondsey, 6 February - 7 April 2019

The paintings in this exhibition splatter the flesh, blood and mucus palettes of Francis Bacon and Cy Twombly across Egon Schiele’s warped technical accuracy of human anatomy. It’s some of the best painting Emin has done for years and is enough to carry the less potent parts of the exhibition. The neon and the selfies seem to blare some loud but ineloquent kind of intimacy at you, and don’t come near the compositional mastery of the paintings and sculptures. Review by Adam Heardman

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NS

Rose English: Form, Feminisms, Femininities

Rose English, Plato's Chair, Vancouver, 1983, Gelatin silver print, 69 x 69 cm

Two lovers lie in bed sleeping. Their duvet is a ploughed field, fabric folds replaced with the undulating peaks and troughs of soil furrows. An air of the uncanny pervades ‘Bed in Field’ (1971), a series of photographs of British performance artist Rose English and her partner of the time tucked into a pastoral landscape. Review by Lotte Johnson

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Eastside Projects, 86 Heath Mill Lane, Birmingham, B9 4AR

The Range

Eastside Projects, The Range, 2018, Photo: Stuart Whipps

Curated by artist Rehana Zaman, ‘The Range’ features new work by six artists, including Ain Bailey, Adam Farah and Beverley Bennett, following close to a year of mostly digital correspondence amongst the group. Internet culture provides much of the source material for their shared exploration and humour, as well as the show’s title, which makes reference to a ‘Little Britain’ sketch and the popular Twitter thread it inspired. Review by Divya Osbon

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Primary, 33 Seely Road Nottingham, NG7 1NU & New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham NG7 6BE

Hardeep Pandhal: Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME

Hardeep Pandhal, Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME (2019), Primary

Nottingham galleries, New Art Exchange and Primary present ‘Paranoid Picnic: The Phantom BAME’, a split-site exhibition of recent and ongoing works by Hardeep Pandhal. A second generation British Sikh now based in Glasgow, Pandhal dissects continuing projects of cultural assimilation and the performance of heritage. Review by Amelia Seren Roberts

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Nederlands Fotomuseum, Gebouw Las Palmas, Wilhelminakade 332, 3072 AR Rotterdam

Rein Jelle Terpstra: Robert F. Kennedy Funeral Train – The People’s View

Copyright William F. Wisnom Sr, Tullytown (PA), 8 June 1968, from Rein Jelle Terpstra, The People's View (2014-2018)

Rein Jelle Terpstra’s ‘The People’s View’ looks back at one of 1968’s most memorable moments to gather Americans together in disbelief: the funeral train of Democratic Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy, which travelled from New York City to Washington DC, on 8 June 1968. Review by Nicola Jeffs

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