Annka Kultys Gallery, 472 Hackney Rd, Unit 3, 1st Floor, London E2 9EQ

Signe Pierce: Faux Realities

Installation view 2017, Signe Pierce, Annka Kultys

“This is where it all started,” Signe Pierce points toward a lone print of a silhouetted palm tree that has somehow managed to wrangle free from the infinite scroll of neon-soaked imagery expanding across the walls of Annka Kultys Gallery for her ‘Faux Realities’ exhibition. Review by Alice Bucknell

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Tschabalala Self

Tschabalala Self, Tramway 2017

American artist Tshabalala Self's work is concerned with the iconographic significance of the black female body in contemporary culture, its fantasies and misrepresentations and their concurrent emotional, physical and psychological impacts. Review by Alex Hetherington

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ALMA ZEVI, Salizzada San Samuele, 3357, 30124 Venice, Italy

John Smith: Films in Sheep’s Clothing

John Smith, Films in Sheep's Clothing, Om, 1986, ALMA ZEVI, 2017

In an increasingly earnest art world, visitors to Alma Zevi’s gallery off the main sway of the Grand Canal can take relief in the comedic value of mistranslation and mistaken identity. John Smith’s films - showcased for the first time in Italy in Zevi’s solo exhibition – are arranged into an artful, tightly curated presentation, and span Smith’s forty-year involvement at the frontline of British conceptual film-making. Review by Olivia Paterson

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Hales Gallery, Tea Building, 7 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA

Carolee Schneemann: More Wrong Things

Carolee Schneemann, More Wrong Things, 2017, Hales London

Recently awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Carolee Schneemann is best known for her innovations in feminist and performance art. Yet Schneemann’s decades-spanning multimedia practice has also consistently questioned the personal and cultural politics of violence and mourning, which the eloquent recent works in the exhibition continue to examine. Review by Carlos Kong

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The Kitchen, 512 W 19th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

That I am reading backwards and into for a purpose, to go on

Installation view, That I am reading backwards and into for a purpose, to go on, The Kitchen

Initially I see and hear numerous bodies on screen; speaking, gesturing, rolling, walking, running, returning and repeating. But the space I inhabit, is absent of any consciously performing bodies. This exhibition is not ‘of’ performance, rather it invites thought on how performance and the performer can be positioned to challenge current inequality, oppression and false-truths. Cicely Farrer reviews

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Staging Series

SIREN, 2017. Louisa Martin. Co-choreographed with and performed by Masumi Saito.

The third event, Louisa Martin’s ‘Siren’ (2017), combined orchestrated sounds, light interventions and an energetic dance co-choreographed and performed by Masumi Saito. The final instalment of the programme, ‘Rushes, Sketches and Schemes’, could not have been more different. Christian Nyampeta presented a live audio-visual session, featuring excerpts and rushes from an ongoing project called ‘Our Common Ghost’ (2015 - present), exploring themes of community, identity and erasure. Henry Broome reviews

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CHEWDAY'S,139 Lambeth Walk, London SE11 6EE

Mathis Gasser: The Dark Forest

Mathis Gasser, The Dark Forest, installation view

Mathis Gasser transfers on to his canvas a digital diagram from the online forum deviantart.com charting all spacecraft featured throughout the history of science fiction, in novels, comics, video games. As such, they are adapted to a type of navigation that can only be theorised and never actually practised. They are the purest form of vessel, and so embody the concept of a ship. Review by Carolina Mostert

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VITRINE, London, 15 Bermondsey Square, London SE1 3UN

Kate Cooper: Ways to Scale

Kate Cooper, Ways to Scale, Installation View 2017

The narrative aspect of the image is ambiguous, with much of what’s happening not revealed by the framing, but nonetheless we can find a young red-haired woman dressed in pristine white to match the white medical environment, some unidentified tech and the tendrils of a jellyfish. Tessa Norton reviews

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Grand Union, Minerva Works, 158 Fazeley St, Birmingham B5 5RS

Seecum Cheung: The Dutch Window

Seecum Cheung, The Dutch Window, 2017.

In a time when saboteurs lurk at home and gossips snipe from afar, some reach for the shutters and draw them fast. Better to be kept in the dark, it’s presumed, than to risk the prying of the ill-intentioned. Britain pulls down the blinds. The Channel has rarely felt wider. Kit Webb reviews Seecum Cheung's 'The Dutch Window'.

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

You Are Looking At Something That Never Occurred

You Are Looking at Something That Never Occurred, 2017. Installation view at Zabludowicz Collection.

With a title taken from an interview with Jeff Wall by Lucas Blalock, ‘You are Looking at Something that Never Occurred' is yet another attempt aiming to challenge the idea that photography identifies with reality and objectivity. Review by Aris Kourkoumelis

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Jürgen Partenheimer: Lichtschwarm

Jürgen Partenheimer, Lichtschwarm, White Cube Bermondsey, 28 April - 18 June 2017

Jürgen Partenheimer's works hover in a peculiar location. Somewhere specifically approximate. In his first London exhibition, ‘Lichtschwarm’ (Light Swarm), Partenheimer presents his continuing and illusive conversation between art of itself and of its circumstances. Jillian Knipe reviews

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Sprüth Magers, Oranienburger Straße 18, 10178 Berlin

Pamela Rosenkranz: She Has No Mouth

Installation view, Pamela Rosenkranz: She Has No Mouth

The Swiss artist Pamela Rosenkranz is interested in the invisible phenomena that affect the material world. Behind a sensual aesthetic, her work is subtly subversive. Rosenkranz often draws from consumer research, notably the effect of toxoplasmosis, a parasite said to infect 30% of the world population and researched for influencing a series of human behaviours, including fear, spending habits, physical attraction and most relevant to the concept of her inaugural solo exhibition at Sprüth Magers Berlin, human fondness for cats. Review by Anaïs Castro

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Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Mat Collishaw: Thresholds

Thresholds, early test visualisation

In the context of Photo London, the artist has brought together the vanguard of Victorian visual technology with current developments in virtual reality programming. Review by Cleo Roberts

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