Banner Repeater, Hackney Downs Network Rail, Platform 1 Dalston Ln, London E8 1LA

De-Leb

De-Leb at Banner Repeater installation view

The exhibition presents a set of possible borders, or more precisely, gives us a kit of instruments to delineate the fitful, slippery and serpentine edges of technology so we can keep control of the data hidden within the substrata of our bodies. The show is more of a virus than an art exhibition, one that sets out to disrupt the control systems that invisibly ensnare us all. Review by Matthew Turner

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Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford, England

America’s Cool Modernism

Le Tournesol (The Sunflower)

Above all, in America’s Cool Modernism at the Ashmolean Museum, the absence of human presence in the artworks betrays an anxiety towards the place of people in an increasingly mechanised world. I found myself thinking about the photographs of Detroit that surfaced several years ago, showing the derelict buildings and factories that remain in the wake of the city’s bankruptcy. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Charlemont House, Parnell Square North, Dublin 1, D01 F2X9, Ireland

Amanda Dunsmore: Keeper

Amanda Dunsmore, John Hume, 2005; installation view, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

In light of seismic political events, and the failed attempts to square the circle that is the Irish Border, Amanda Dunsmore’s exhibition ‘Keeper’ in Dublin’s Hugh Lane seems increasingly vital and brings the Good Friday Agreement into sharper focus. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Rd, London NW3 6DG

Sadie Benning: Sleep Rock

Hotel Fashion

When I first saw Sadie Benning’s ground-breaking ‘cut and paste’ video work in the early 1990s, with their cool soundtracks and deadpan narrations, it was clear that here was an artist who was ahead of their time and whose influence can be seen in practices from Mark Leckey to Heather Phillipson. For their first solo exhibition in London, Benning presents new work that continues their interest in autobiography and found imagery which now finds form through a filmic sequence of paintings and collages. Review by Piers Masterson

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Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstraße 7, 10963 Berlin

Covered in Time and History: The Films of Ana Mendieta

Sweating Blood

Ana Mendieta remains a significant artistic figure of the 1970s and 1980s because of her radical practice encompassing performance, gender and geo-political identity. The extensive self-documentation of her performances (which were often enacted alone) on primarily Super 8 film has allowed for her works to survive to this day. Review by Joan Lee

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Stephen Friedman Gallery 25-28 Old Burlington Street London W1S 3AN

Andreas Eriksson: Kria

installation view

Stephen Friedman Gallery is delighted to present Swedish artist Andreas Eriksson's third solo exhibition at the gallery: ‘Kria'. Living and working in Lidköping, Sweden, he is known for the unique way he examines nature and the history of painting to illustrate the quiet beauty that underscores everyday life.

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Yto Barrada: Agadir

Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View with performers Nick Armfield, Rory Francis, Tallulah Bond and Jonny Lavelle, Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View, The Curve, Barbican Centre, 7 February - 20 May 2018

Commissioned by the Barbican as part of the ‘Art of Change’ programme, Moroccan-born artist Yto Barrada has taken over the Curve gallery with a display of loss, separation and re-emergence. Referencing the novel ‘Agadir’ by Mohammed Khaïr Eddine, the artist reworks the spinal layout of the gallery as a fragmented timeline. Using photography, film, performance and collage, Barrada guides us through a history of colonialism, political subversion and the failure of a Modernist architectural utopia, all wrapped up in an event – an earthquake – that all but destroyed the city in fifteen seconds in 1960. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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The Koppel Prpject Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Natur Blick

Installation view, Natur Blick, The Koppel Project

In ‘Natur Blick’, scanning - the instinctive visual movement of the human eye, a gesture co-opted by modern technology - is the subject of the work of ten contemporary artists. Review by Olivia Aherne

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Roman Road, 69 Roman Road, London E2 0QN

Alix Marie: La Femme Fontaine

Alix Marie: La Femme Fontaine, installation view, Roman Road, London, 5 April - 20 May 2018.

Water declares itself the primary medium of Alix Marie’s ‘La Femme Fontaine’ – its presence in the gallery is inescapable. Running through long, clear tubes, it finds its way into every corner of the space. It scales the high walls only to come back to the ground. It trickles audibly into shining silver bowls and the splashing carries and echoes. It spills on to the floor, collecting in shallow puddles. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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The approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Evren Tekinoktay: Serpentine

Evren Tekinoktay,Serpentine, Installation view

The overall aesthetic of the current exhibition, ‘Serpentine’, is remarkably conservative. The collages appear to be simple cut-outs; I stare at them, and they freeze. The lines, corners and edges form sharp patterns through the gallery wall; and they are softened by the pale colours outlining and filling the shapes. Review by Carolina Mostert

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Castlefield Gallery, 2 Hewitt Street Manchester, M15 4GB

Ruth Barker & Hannah Leighton-Boyce

Ruth Barker, Victory, 2013, Her whole self, 2018

Set against the backdrop of the centenary celebrations of the suffragette movement, Castlefield Gallery's exhibition – which is co-commissioned with the University of Salford Art Collection – is the result of Ruth Barker and Hannah Leighton-Boyce's year-long research and production residencies. Throughout 2017, the two artists exchanged ideas from their respective locations in Salford and Glasgow; each delving into the long-standing archives of either the University of Salford Art Collection or the Glasgow Women's Library in order to formulate new visual narratives. Review by Selina Oakes

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Parc de la Villette, 211 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 75019 Paris, France

Interview: Will Ryman on his commission for Parc de la Villette

Will Ryman, La Villette, Heads

New York-based sculptor Will Ryman recently unveiled his first large-scale European presentation of work in La Villette, an expansive urban public park located in the northeast of Paris. Three sculptures, ‘Pac-Lab’, ‘Heads’ and ‘Sisyphus’ (all 2018), have been commissioned as part of the interdisciplinary Festival 100%. Made first in clay and then fabricated in painted resin and bronze respectively, the sculptures have a theatrical bent, something the artist is keen to connect to personal experiences of making processes, histories and audience dialogue. Anneka French speaks to the artist.

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Met Breuer, 945 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now)

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) at the Met Breuer, 2018

Like Life, current on view at the Met Breuer, is a sweeping paean to historical contemporaneity, but where crowded chaos or a pandering sense of prurience could easily reign, co-curators Sheena Wagstaff and Luke Syson manage to imbue the eerie magic of mimesis with an academic bent that won’t intimidate fair-weather tourists. Review by Torey Akers

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Huxley-Parlour, 3-5 Swallow St, Mayfair, London W1B 4DE

Jocelyn Lee: The Appearance of Things

The Bath

It would be hard for anyone, man or woman, to walk into the Jocelyn Lee’s exhibition at Huxley-Parlour and not feel surrounded by the regenerative power of nature and its symbiotic connection to the female body. Of course, these themes have walked hand-in-hand since the earliest forms of visual art, but Lee manages to shed a new light on this age-old allegory in her photography by capturing the physical world in all its transience and fragility. Review by Kristina Foster

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