Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AJ

ARTIST ROOMS Gerhard Richter

 ARTIST ROOMS Gerhard Richter, installation view, 2015

The first ARTIST ROOMS exhibition at Plymouth Museum presents a relatively minimal but carefully selected range of works which bring to light much of Gerhard Richter’s artistic complexity. Review by Edith Doove

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CIRCA Projects, John Joyce Building, Saltmeadows Road, Gateshead NE8 3AH

Mario Pfeifer: Approximation in the digital age to a humanity condemned to disappear

 Mario Pfeifer: Approximation in the digital age to a humanity condemned to disappear, installation view at CIRCA Projects, 2015

‘Approximation in the digital age to a humanity condemned to disappear’, seems like a prophetic title, steeped in a type of dystopian rhetoric; in fact it is a much more specific, contemplative description of the dissolution of smaller cultural identities, irreverently ignored and ousted by globalised industry and capital. Review by Josh Wilson

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Jacob Lewis Gallery, 521 West 26th Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10001

Matthew Weinstein: É Lobro

Matthew Weinstein, É Lobro, film still, 2015

In Weinstein’s ‘É Lobro’ there are references to the voyeuristic gaze, the coy flirtations of a beautiful but non-emotive female character, and the delicious precision of Death bathed in precious metal. Review by Shana Beth Mason

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Emily Jacir: Europa

Installation view, Emily Jacir: Europa (Nothing Will Happen (eight normal Saturdays in Linz), 2003) Whitechapel Gallery, London 30 September 2015 - 3 January 2016

The exhibition opens with a photograph of Palestinian translator and scholar Wael Zuaiter. It shows his body awkwardly slumped on a street in Rome, following his assassination by Israeli Mossad agents in 1972. Siobhan Leddy reviews this complex research project.

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Royal Academy, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei, Video Recorder, 2010. Marble, 43 x 19 x 19 cm

It is the first room that captures the imagination in Ai Weiwei’s striking, frequently spectacular exhibition. To reach it, first you must pass through a thicket of reconstructed trees, each clamped into place by rusting iron girders in the RA courtyard. A counter to these snarling, twisted, fairy tale forms, the opening room eschews theatricality to thrilling effect. Edward Ball reviews

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Sprüth Magers, 7A Grafton St, London W1S 4EJ

Thomas Demand: Latent Forms

Thomas Demand, LATENT FORMS, Installation View, Sprueth Magers London, 13 October - 19 December, 2015

Latent Forms marks a stark departure from Demand's distinctive photographic style. Although three-dimensional architectural models remain his subjects, he has neither constructed them nor photographed them to look like real places. Review by Aris Kourkoumelis

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Kunsthalle Wien, Museumsplatz 1 1070 Vienna, Austria

Political Populism

Political Populism, Installation View

'Political Populism' is the extremely populist title for an exhibition which aims to critically question this phenomenon through artistic means. The exhibition is not designed to present a picture of the cultural and historical development of populist tendencies but instead gathers over twenty international artists’ works and showcases them according to diverse topics.

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London, WC2N 4HE

All the Revolving Cells

All the Revolving Cells, Installation View

'All the Revolving Cells' at Tenderpixel considers how to create a wider set of relations where nature is understood as a historical and material conditioning of social life.

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Leeds Art Gallery, The Headrow, Leeds, West Yorkshire LS1 3AA

British Art Show 8

Anthea Hamilton, Ant Farms, 2015

Every five years the British Art Show, now in its eighth edition, tours four venues throughout the UK. The scale of the exhibition is colossal, the curatorial impetus similarly large in that it seeks to gauge the current climate of contemporary British art. Review by Fiona Haggerty

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