Viewing articles tagged with 'Dublin'

Mother’s Tankstation, 31-43 Watling St, Usher's Island, The Liberties, Dublin 8, D08 NP48, Ireland

Niamh O’Malley: Placeholder

Park shapes

The first work you encounter on entering mother’s tankstation to see Niamh O’Malley’s ‘Placeholder’ is ‘Gather’ (2019), a balance of strength and delicacy with its coloured glass cuboids that are pierced and supported by a steel bar. This is the only ‘old’ work in this new exhibition and it is hardly old at all having been shown late last year in O’Malley’s ‘handle’ in Dublin’s RHA. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Gabriel Kuri: spending static to save gas

spending static to save gas, 2020, installation view

There is a comforting routine to visiting exhibitions in Dublin’s Douglas Hyde Gallery - you enter the foyer and walk past the main desk to the top of the staircase, which gives a sweeping preview of the work as you descend into the gallery’s main space, your foot hitting the same spot each time. This comfort has been removed by Gabriel Kuri’s radical structural intervention ‘spending static to save gas’ (2020), featured in his exhibition of the same name. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin

Derek Jarman: PROTEST!

The Garden

The vast scale of work on show is what grips you first when entering ‘PROTEST!’, the Derek Jarman retrospective at Dublin’s Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA). It spans the entirety of IMMA’s West Wing, comprising 11 rooms, a number of alcoves and two long, connecting corridors. The show displays works from the four decades of Jarman’s career, beginning in the late-50s, as he entered King’s College London, through to the ‘90s and his untimely death in 1994 from an AIDS-related illness aged just 52. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

Tai Shani: Tragodía

Tai Shani, Tragodia, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. Photograph by Kasia Kaminska

Blue is the first thing that greets you at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. An inviting blue covers the gallery’s exterior windows, providing privacy to those inside. Beyond the blue, as it does on the visible spectrum of light, lies violet. This warm shade of lavender wraps itself around the internal walls and dominates the gallery floor via a large and continuous sculpture in the same hue. Beyond violet on the visible spectrum lies ultraviolet, the invisible, the mystical. In Tai Shani’s ‘Tragodía’ this movement through colour is represented by a virtual reality play which requires special eyewear to view. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Royal Hibernian Academy, Gallagher Gallery, 15 Ely Place, Dublin 2, Ireland

SUBSET: Micro Vs. Macro

SUBSET: Micro Vs. Macro

While there are a number of strands to the on-going topic of the climate that require action, fundamentally at their core is a need for behavioural change. This topic forms the core of ‘Climate’ - a three-part project from SUBSET, which is an anonymous collective of artists known for their arresting street murals. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Irish Museum of Modern Art, Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Military Rd, Kilmainham, Dublin 8, Ireland

Kim Gordon: She bites her tender mind

Proposal For A Dance (still)

Kim Gordon first came to prominence in the mid-80s as a member of the noise band Sonic Youth - co-founded with her ex-husband Thurston Moore and active until 2011, when both the band and marriage dissolved. Since then Gordon has become a polymath: releasing music from several projects, embarking on an acting career, writing the acclaimed ‘Girl in a Band’ memoir on her years in Sonic Youth, and focusing on her visual art practice that took a backseat during her tenure with the band. It is this last category that sees us drawn to Dublin’s Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) to see Gordon’s latest exhibition ‘She bites her tender mind’. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

staring forms: Miranda Blennerhassett, Aleana Egan, Andreas Kindler von Knobloch, Tanad Williams

staring forms, installation image, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Mid-way through ‘A Game of Chess’, the second section of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem ‘The Waste Land’, come the words that have lent themselves to the title of ‘staring forms’, a new group exhibition in Dublin’s Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. In these lines Eliot references the ancient (and violent) Greek myth of King Tereus and the sisters Philomela and Procne, all three of whom were turned into birds by the gods. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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dlr Lexicon, Haigh Terrace, Moran Park, Dún Laoghaire, Ireland

Paul Hallahan & Lee Welch: And the tide was way out

Paul Hallahan & Lee Welch: And the tide was way out, dlr Lexicon, 2019

In ‘And the tide was way out’ we are presented with two distinct approaches by the artists to painting, and while they converge in two works at the centre of the main gallery space, their divergence dominates the duo exhibition. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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mother’s tankstation, 41- 43 Watling Street, Usher’s Island, Dublin, D08 NP48, Ireland

Lee Kit: Banal

Blue skied and clear

As you enter Dublin’s mother’s tankstation and Lee Kit’s ‘Banal’ you are greeted by Gnarls Barkley’s 2006 hit song ‘Crazy’. A search for the source of ‘I think you’re crazy’ (2017) reveals a pair of headphones overhead, dangled upside down and tantalisingly out of reach - and out of use. On the wall Kit has, through a plastic storage container, projected a video that has some of the song’s lyrics overlaid, with others missing. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Irish Museum of Modern Art, Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Military Rd, Kilmainham, Dublin 8, Ireland

Wolfgang Tillmans: Rebuilding the Future

Wolfgang Tillmans, Rebuilding the Future, 26 October 2018 – 17 February 2019, Installation view IMMA, Dublin, 2018

Tillmans’ selection and presentation of his work is unique to each setting and here we see the choice to present, for the first time in a number of years, the early-career hospital operating theatre ‘I’ and ‘II’ from 1994, in the setting of a former hospital; indicating the work’s sensitivity and ability to respond to its environment and shape the narrative. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Charlemont House, Parnell Square North, Dublin 1, D01 F2X9, Ireland

Amanda Dunsmore: Keeper

Amanda Dunsmore, John Hume, 2005; installation view, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

In light of seismic political events, and the failed attempts to square the circle that is the Irish Border, Amanda Dunsmore’s exhibition ‘Keeper’ in Dublin’s Hugh Lane seems increasingly vital and brings the Good Friday Agreement into sharper focus. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5 - 9 Temple Bar, Dublin 2, Ireland

Katrina Palmer: The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier

Katrina Palmer, The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier, 2018, Installation view, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Her two-tone and inverted printing, combined with these notations, help turn the map into a celestial chart for navigating the tale. Along with this map, Palmer presents a pair of audio recordings, featuring a ‘silent’ reading room within the gallery, circus tunes, sampled music, as well as a dual voice recording. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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mother's tankstation limited, 41-43 Watling Street, Usher's Island, Dublin 8, D08 NP48, Ireland

Yuri Pattison: Sunset Provision

Yuri Pattison: Sunset Provision, installation view at mother's tankstation limited, 2016

Yuri Pattison’s first solo exhibition in Ireland springs from a longstanding examination of the refractive impact of automation on time, loneliness, and the demands of productivity housed in an emergent co-working culture driven by and contingent on technological success.

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Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2

Gretchen Bender

Gretchen Bender, Total Recall, 1987

‘Total Recall’ works best when thought as a kind of collage: forcing irreconcilable images alongside one another, it creates the imperative towards a narrative, or at least the sense of one. Review by Rebecca O’Dwyer

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