Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Thomas Bock and Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate

James and Henry Barnard

The first UK-exhibition dedicated to the work of the Birmingham-born convict artist, Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855), at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, is paired with the concurrent exhibition, Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate. This was the the result of a three-year residency spent by the artist at HMP Grendon – Europe’s only entirely therapeutic prison. Despite widely differing careers they both viscerally remind us of the dangers of denying any person a sense of identity. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Chelsea Space, 16 John Islip St, London SW1P 4JU

Ian Giles: After BUTT

Installation view, Ian Giles: After BUTT. Image courtesy Ian Giles and Chelsea Space, copyright Rob Harris

When does a cultural artefact – a magazine, a film, an artwork – cease to be considered what we might call ‘contemporary’ and enter the realm of the historical? A minute ago? Yesterday? The turn of the millennium? Once its creator/s have passed away? Not until it starts to have what might be called a legacy? Helena Haimes reviews ‘After BUTT’ by Ian Giles, new film currently showing at London’s Chelsea Space.

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Pump House Gallery, Battersea Park, London SW11 4NJ

Sriwhana Spong: a hook but no fish

Sriwhana Spong, a hook but no fish installation view, 2017.

Sophie Risner reviews a presentation of work by Sriwhana Spong which takes the work of twelfth century female mystic named Hildegard von Bingen as its central reference point.

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Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice installation view

Susan Philipsz’s work has often been described as a form of ‘sound sculpture’ that you hear long before you see it. The exact significance behind A Single Voice is not perfectly clear. Philipsz has pointed out that the apocalyptic story of Aniara holds just as much relevance today as when the poem was first written in 1956 (arguably more), and the mournful quality of the deconstructed violin combined with the player’s stark isolation as she accompanies an invisible, inaudible orchestra through her headphones, could almost be read as a last chilling goodbye to the human race as it peters into extinction. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Hauser & Wirth London, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Monika Sosnowska: Structural Exercises

Installation view, Monika Sosnowska. Structural Exercises, Hauser & Wirth London,  1 December 2017 to 10 February 2018

Monika Sosnowska is known for turning space into her canvas and the exhibition of new work by the artist currently on show at Hauser & Wirth’s space in Savile Row is no different. Titled ‘Structural Exercises,’ it is both a display of sculptures and an immersive installation – large scale structures extend in space so ambitiously as to transcend the boundaries between each other. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre, Gibbet Hill Rd, Coventry CV4 7AL

Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

Installation view, Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

The internet and advertising provide us with a constant barrage of images. In the face of this mass it can be hard to find meaning. Clare Woods' current exhibition at Mead Gallery is a direct refusal of this position. She presents only a handful of works to allow us a clarity of vision which is incredibly refreshing. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Chiba City Museum of Art: 3 Chome-10-8 Chuo, Chiba, Chiba Prefecture 260-0013, Japan

Tsuyoshi Ozawa: Imperfection: Parallel Art History

Imperfection

Tsuyoshi Ozawa not only interrogates modern Japanese art history, illuminating the unique and sometimes odd pathways it has taken, he also questions the acts of looking and showing. He is distinct from Takashi Murakami, who proudly proclaimed the value of forgotten history by pushing anime-like figures to the forefront. Ozawa keeps an unstable and ambiguous position, enjoying the diverse and imaginative visions sustained by his perspicacity and sense of humour. Review by Kodama Kanazawa

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Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke St, Oxford OX1 1BP

Hannah Ryggen: Woven Histories

Ethiopia / Etiopia

Six years before her death in 1970, Ryggen became the first female artist to represent Norway at the Venice Biennale, and, in more recent years, has been the subject of several important retrospectives. As the relationship between politics and the public continues to find its twenty-first century feet, the uncompromising boldness of Ryggen’s tapestries, seen in her current exhibition, Woven Histories, at Modern Art Oxford, and their gentle interrogation of questions concerning nationality, identity, inequality and storytelling seem all too strangely close to home. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Ilona Sagar: Correspondence O

Still from Correspondence 0, Ilona Sagar 2017.

Like conducting an autopsy of her own subject matter, Ilona Sagar projects her film ‘Correspondence O’ on to a split screen, cut down the middle and opened out. The rest of the room is dark like an operating theatre after hours with its monitors left running, which continue to project the sterile blues and desaturated tones most often associated with hospitals. Review by Matthew Turner

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Michael Armitage: The Chapel

Michael Armitage, The Chapel, installation view at the South London Gallery, 2017.

Following on from his excellent show in summer 2017 at Turner Contemporary with this exhibition of eight new paintings, Michael Armitage stakes a strong claim to being the leading figurative painter of the group that has emerged from London art schools in the last decade. Review by Piers Masterson

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London, SE1 0LN

Jerwood/Photoworks Awards

Alejandra Carles-Tolra, Untitled, 2017, from the series Where We Belong.

Over the last year, the artists have been creating a new body of work with the award’s support. The results are diverse, touching on femininity, belonging, nature and death. Yet, despite their differences, an underlying premise surfaces - each work is charged with a desire to escape contemporary life, either by creating fictions or by returning to our pasts. Review by Sophie Ruigrok

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014, USA

Laura Owens

Untitled, 2015 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York)

The Whitney Museum of American Art has historically positioned itself in the public imagination as an incontrovertible arbiter of taste, the sort of claim that makes its stale, self-consciously presentist choices all the more discouraging. As such, the Laura Owens retrospective currently on view feels less like the mid-career survey of a serious painter and more like an overblown Instagram backdrop, a pandering move that undercuts Owens’ contributions and reasserts the Whitney’s distance from artistic innovation. Review by Torey Akers

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Stanley Picker Gallery, Kingston University, London Kingston School of Art, Grange Road, Kingston upon Thames KT1 2QJ

P!CKER, PART II Céline Condorelli: Prologue

Céline Condorelli, ‘Prologue' (2017), installation view, Stanley Picker Gallery at Kingston University London.

Condorelli’s prologue is merely the latest episode in a continuous process of exchange and renewal, where the legacy of a project – in this case both Lustig Cohen’s show, and Condorelli’s own show at P! last year – is archived, mined and reworked, forming new projects, new exhibitions, and new ways of understanding the contexts within which we work. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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The Geffen Contemporary At MOCA, 152 N Central Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90012, USA

Adrián Villar Rojas: The Theater of Disappearance

MOCA presents Adrián Villar Rojas: The Theater of Disappearance, a site-specific installation inside The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA’s warehouse space. Villar Rojas (b. 1980, Rosario, Argentina) has built a singular practice by creating environments and objects that seem to be in search of their place in time. Villar Rojas’s interventions beckon viewers to consider fragments that exist in a slippery space between the future, the past, and an alternate reality in the present. With his post-human artworks, Villar Rojas posits the question: What happens after the end of art?

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