Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London, NW1 5DA

Mary Corse

Mary Corse, installation view, Lisson Gallery London, May 2018

Mary Corse’s first major UK show at Lisson Gallery, London, is as much a scientific inquiry as it is art. Newtonian science extracts emotion from the situations it is used to examine, the same, by extension, could be said of its strange alter ego quantum mechanics. Review by Matthew Turner

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves

Installation Image of Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves at Whitechapel Gallery

Entering Katja Novitskova’s ‘Invasion Curves’ at Whitechapel Gallery is like stepping into the set of a science fiction film. Metallic wires, flashing lights, giant eggs and a human brain occupy the gallery space. Surrounding this landscape, floating sheets of Perspex and resin hang from the ceiling and display phrases such as ‘the right to harvest resources’, ‘we are at an inflection point’, and the title ‘invasion curves’. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Mother's Tankstation, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Maria Farrar: Eaves Deep

Dresser

Though it appears brittle, the Greyhound is strong and quick, its structure contradicts its force. Similarly with Maria Farrar’s paintings, lines become not just convenient structure, but a directional thing-in-itself. Review by Alex Bennett

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The Bower 'Ladies', Unit 1, Brunswick Park, Camberwell, London, SE5 7RH

Frances Scott: Diviner

Diviner

Made from seemingly hours painstakingly trawling through the South West Film and Television Archive based in Plymouth, Frances Scott’s exquisite film work, ‘Diviner’, marks the inaugural outing for newly opened exhibition and event space, The Bower. We are presented with an opulent 23 minute-long work which uses the short documentary, ‘Diviner Water in Luppitt’ (1976), as a locus for a broader sociological investigation. As a diviner might predict the future or locate water, Scott’s acute dexterity to hone the archive both realises and relinquishes the agency within; here her ability to re-appropriate the past negotiates a space for the present day to find shelter. Review by Sophie Risner

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National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire, and Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire

The Course of Empire: The Savage State

Looking at some of Cole’s earliest American landscape paintings, made after his move to New York from Philadelphia in 1825, the contrast is arresting. The Edenic quality of his scenery is hard to miss. There’s a quiet stillness to paintings like ‘View of the Round-Top in the Catskill Mountains’ (1827), in which the landscapes seem both fresh and undisturbed; not only are they new to Cole – and “new to Art”, as he writes in his journal – but they seem somehow newly created, as if the painting’s mists were rising from a just-finished topography. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Handel Street Projects, 14 Florence Street, London N1 2DX

Graham Gussin: The Mary Jane Paintings

Graham Gussin: The Mary Jane Paintings installation view

Graham Gussin’s The Mary Jane Paintings are illegal. They aren’t illegal in the same way that the art market is increasingly criminal, such as how the sale of da Vinci’s Salvador Mundi was called ‘the biggest art fraud in history’ or how works of art featured heavily in the Panama Papers as vehicles for tax evasion and other financial crimes. Instead, they are directly illegal; made from hashish that has been ground down, mixed with linseed oil and applied to linen and paper. Review by Matthew Turner

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Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, Norfolk Road, Norwich NR4 7TJ

Brian Clarke: The Art of Light

Brian Clarke: The Art of Light at the Sainsbury Centre, supported and organised in association with HENI

Stained glass artist Brian Clarke can remember when the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts was merely a sketch on the back of a napkin. The napkin belonged to architect Norman Foster, and the sketch utilised a unique approach - integrating building with landscape - using the style of structural expressionism. Considering this integration, it would seem fitting that the ‘finally-celebrated’ artist should take advantage of the centre’s grand windows. Review by Paul Black

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Tramway, 25 Albert Dr, Glasgow G41 2PE

Laida Lertxundi: WORDS, PLANETS

 WORDS, PLANETS (still)

In a discussion about his work the late Chilean experimental filmmaker, Raúl Ruíz, said that his ‘films would have to be seen many times, like objects in the house, like a painting…’, that ‘landscape is used as a story’ and that he sought to draw upon ‘connections between film, installation, writing, theatre’ that in his extensive body of works, including the theoretical text ‘Poetics of Cinema’, made between 1963 and 2010, could be described as a nesting of stories, residing within each other, and of stories co-existing; of narratives, often fragmented and elliptical, and their layering together. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Paul Maheke: A fire circle for a public hearing

Paul Maheke, A place you only go through (2018). Produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery and Vleeshal Center for Contemporary Art, Middelburg

When A Fire Circle For A Public Hearing opened at Chisenhale Gallery last April, it was quite frustrating to learn that Paul Maheke was not going to perform live for the whole duration of the exhibition. Despite being completely absent from the stage, Maheke’s body is still present through a video work that plays on a continuous loop. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Josh Lilley Gallery, 44 – 46 Riding House St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 7EX

Brian Bress: Another Fine Mess

Brian Bress: Another Fine Mess installation view

Brian Bress has long been casting characters, almost always himself in costume, into videos carefully composed with subtle pathos. In these, the modes have grown more sophisticated with focus on the narrow confines of portraiture of tightly framed figures, their goofy attitude streamlined into more elegant displays with the scale of each character’s body relative to our own. Review by Alex Bennett

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Paradise Works, East Philip Street, Salford, Manchester, M3 7LE

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs installation view

Alongside his artistic practice, Nick Jordan has spent a number of years filming mental health training videos for the University of Manchester’s hospital teaching unit, encountering many cases of ‘disorder’ as a result. This latest body of work, presented at Paradise Works, on the border between Manchester and Salford, responds to one kind of psychosis in particular: a manifestation of schizophrenia known as ‘thought broadcasting’, whereby patients believe that their thoughts are being transmitted and heard by others. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art, Witte de Withstraat 50, 3012 BR Rotterdam, Netherlands

Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition

Irene Kopelman, 77 Colors of a Volcanic Landscape A, B, C (2016) and Puzzle Piece (2012) part of Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art 2018

Stepping into Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, lands one in an ambiguously sparse installation filled with plenty of air and light. Here it takes time to adjust to the presentation’s scope, as some of the works offer bare whispers of visual information that are delicately precise representations that cannot be grasped in a few milliseconds. Review by John Gayer

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Yorkshire Sculpture Park, West Bretton, Wakefield WF4 4LG

Giuseppe Penone: A Tree in the Wood

Luce e ombra (detail)

The use of wood, twigs and leaves in his work seems to recall Penone’s artistic output of the 60s and 70s, as part of the Italian art movement ‘Arte Povera’ (Poor Art), which placed an emphasis on the use of throwaway materials. However, today, Penone does not shy away from monumentalizing mediums. Review by Kristina Foster

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