Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Interview with Henry Hudson

20:24:38 - 20:24:39 pm

The British-American artist Henry Hudson is known for his ‘Jungles': a colourful collection of plasticine works that have been exhibited around the world. And while he has an upcoming exhibition in India showcasing exactly that, he’s also venturing outside of his comfort zone. Recently, he has been exploring other mediums; ceramics, oil and iPad paintings, some of which will be on display at another exhibition in Vienna this fall. I joined Hudson at his East London studio to discuss what he’s been up to during lockdown and the pandemic-inspired works that are currently in progress. Interview by Shelby Wilder

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Kiasma, Mannerheiminaukio 2, 00100 Helsinki, Finland

Liisa Lounila: Shadow Zone

7BPM

There’s a stillness in Liisa Lounila’s moving image works that inspires an urge to slow-down, to sit-down and to stay put, for a while. ‘Shadow Zone’, a collection of Lounila’s works from 2008 to 2020, challenges the viewer to observe the slight nuances in a seemingly repetitive world. Though spanning over a decade, the pieces selected remain relevant today; reflecting on broad themes such as the environment and consumerism, while providing a space in which to reinvigorate our relationship with the screen and digital media. Review by Selina Oakes

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Interview with Cooking Sections

CLIMAVORE: On Tidal Zones. Cooking Sections. Site specific. 2016

Cooking Sections is a collaboration between London-based Daniel Fernández Pascual and Alon Schwabe, who started working together in 2012 while studying at the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London. The duo describe themselves as ‘spatial practitioners,’ and use a combination of art, architecture and landscape design to comment on the systems that organise the world. Interview by Kirsty White

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Intersticio London, 469 Bethnal Green Road, E2 9QH London

Adrenaline Querubín featured in Where Water Rumbles, Metalloids

Intervention piece by Esther Gatón

Intersticio London and its inaugural exhibition, ‘Where Water Rumbles, Metalloids’ allowed curator Cristina Herráiz and artist Esther Gatón to “deform the inherited ways of working and showing”. Speaking with Emma O'Brien, their discussion ranged from an analysis of societal discourse in the context of Covid-19, the notion of an altered normality and the role artists play in rethinking strategies in order to drive forward the changes we need to see in the world at large.

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Schinkel Pavillon, Oberwallstraße 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany

John Miller: An Elixir of Immortality

Installation view, An Elixir of Immortality, John Miller, photo: Andrea Rossetti

The first retrospective of John Miller’s work in Germany, ‘An Elixir of Immortality’ provides a comprehensive overview spanning from the 1980s to the present. Exhibited at Schinkel Pavillon is a divergent and at times incongruous body of work, including sculpture, video and painting. Miller refuses to be pigeonholed or swiftly pinned down, punctuating his work with a beat of wry humour along the way. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, 6 Heddon Street, London W1B 4BT

Painting with Light: The Photography of Ming Smith

Ming Smith, Trio in Gambela, Ethiopia, (1973/2003), archival pigment print, 40.6 x 50.8 c

Smith's photographic style is candid street photography, expressive rather than direct documentation. Embedded within her photographs is emotion, feeling, and life enhanced by the precise colour and light that forms each composition. Review by Sheena Carrington

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Josh Lilley, 40 - 46 Riding House Street, London W1W 7EX

Tom Anholt: Notes on Everything

Tom Anholt, installation view

Anholt is as much a raconteur as a painter. There are not many contemporary artists, or writers for that matter, who can set a scene better. Figures plucked from his reverie traipse across the canvas in technicolour pyjamas like lost sleepwalkers in scenery that resembles a psychedelic underworld. Review by Ted Targett

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The Tetley, Hunslet Road, Leeds LS10 1JQ

Taus Makhacheva: Hold Your Horses

Taus Makhacheva, ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) Spa, 2018.

When The Tetley gallery in Leeds opened Taus Makhacheva’s exhibition ‘Hold Your Horses’, the world was still aggressively galloping forward. No one knew that in a month’s time the pandemic stasis would impose the idiom’s meaning on life as we know it. Yet, the works included in the exhibition explore several themes that seem to be critical at this point. Review by Jaroslava Tomanova

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Odeon of Herodes Atticus, Dionysiou Areopagitou, Athina 105 55, Greece

Dionisis Kavallieratos: Disoriented Dance / Misled Planet

Installation view Disoriented dance / Misled planet, Pitchers

Oh, it feels good to be back looking at art. Standing in the open air of this historic site, Dionisis Kavallieratos’s ‘Disoriented Dance / Misled Planet’ feels like exactly the right show to be seeing at this moment. It’s playful, gentle on the mind and easy on the eye, contemporary, but riffing on ancient themes, challenging, but not too much so. Review by William Summerfield

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John Hansard Gallery, 142-144 Above Bar St, Southampton SO14 7DU

David Blandy: How to Fly | How to Live

David Blandy, How to Fly

The current Covid-19 pandemic has thrown the art world into a fight for relevancy that, as galleries and museums have had to close their doors, reveals the limits of their techie expertise. Many face new challenges, but the technophilic, literate, and adept are of course out there. David Blandy is one such case, and two new video works by Blandy, commissioned by John Hansard Gallery, reflect on the current crisis. Review by Stan Portus

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Cao Fei: Blueprints

Cao Fei, Nova, 2019, Video

On the wall of a lobby, against a deep red velvet backdrop, a prophetic message welcomes the visitor: ‘In our splendid universe, motion pictures mirror our reality’. In Cao Fei’s ‘Blueprints’, different worlds merge and flip. Combining theatrical sets, photography, moving images, and her first VR work, the artist traces patterns of reality, teleporting visitors through distant territories and histories. Focusing on the district of Jiuxianqiao in Beijing, where the first Chinese computer was invented, the exhibition offers local perspectives of contemporary technological developments in China, mapping feelings that resonate globally. Review by Giulia Civardi

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External Pages

Legacy Russell: BLACK MEME

BLACK MEME, video on website, Legacy Russell, External Pages - externalpages.org

You are browsing the internet at different speeds, across temporalities. You take a deep dive in the realm of ‘BLACK MEME’, encountering material you are surrounded by every day. A journey curated by Legacy Russell. Review by Clara Nissim

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Kerlin Gallery, Anne's Ln, Dublin 2, D02 A028, Ireland

Samuel Laurence Cunnane

Cunnane produces striking images of the built environment, brand new and abandoned buildings, plants, the sea, the lie of the land, a frosty morning, a cloud of mist, Siobhán sitting in the back seat of a car (her face half hidden behind clenched-up fists), a bruised arm and a burning truck. His pictures show that he possesses an extraordinary capacity to see the remarkable and the mundane in the things around him, as well as a knack for embodying such contradictory characteristics in his work. Review by John Gayer

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