Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Workplace, The Old Post Office, 19-21 West Street Gateshead, Tyne & Wear NE8 1AD

Emily Hesse: The Taste of this History: A Church in my Mouth

Emily Hesse The, Shedding: The Glass Ceiling, 2018, Collage on found photograph, 43.25 x 57.5 x 3 cm

Hesse’s questioning of her own proximity to the notional centre of the art is illustrated by the circle drawn on the gallery floor that the pin hangs above - is she inside or outside the circuit of acceptance? The artist can be heard reading from her book ‘Black Birds Born from Invisible Stars’ which details touchingly her frequently disenchanting encounters with art institutions. Review by Piers Masterson

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MCA Denver, 1485 Delgany Street, 80202, USA

Tara Donovan: Fieldwork

Untitled (Mylar), 2011, Mylar and hot glue, Dimensions variable, Site-specific installation

On a physical and material level, but most crucially on a metaphysical and referential plane, Donovan's works multiply, fold and expand beyond the sum of their parts. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 Duke Street, St James's, London SW1Y 6BN

Amie Siegel: Backstory

The Noon Complex, 2016, three-channel HD video installation, colour/sound, edition 2 of 5 + 2AP

Amie Siegel’s exhibition ‘Backstory’ at London’s Thomas Dane Gallery opens with an unassuming series of works on paper. ‘Body Scripts’ (2015) consists of framed pages from a novel by Italian novelist Alberto Moravia that was the inspiration for Jean-Luc Godard’s classic film ‘Contempt’ (1963). Using only pages that feature the female protagonist, the artist uses sea-blue paint to erase phrases and sentences that don’t directly refer to the character. The result is an architectural geometry that flows from frame to frame and creates a visual context for the actions of the protagonist. Review by Anna Souter

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Christine Ay Tjoe: Black, kcalB, Black, kcalB

Christine Ay Tjoe, Black, kcalB, Black, kcalB, White Cube Bermondsey, 28 November 2018 - 20 January 2019

Christine Ay Tyoe’s second exhibition at White Cube presents the artist in a darker, pensive, more Gothic mood than her more colourful debut here in 2016. Half the works shown are a series of aluminium etching plates on which the artist has drawn in black ink a bestiary of her familiar grotesques. Review by Piers Masterson

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Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London SE5 7RW

Evy Jokhova: Weighed down by stones

Totem XII, 2018, MDF, paint, castor wheels, Perspex, acoustic felt, stone collection, motion sensors, computer, headphones, 60 x 60 x 152 cm (detail)

At Lily Brooke, Evy Jokhova’s latest installation ‘Weighed down by stones’ is archaeological, concerning the weight of the past upon the present and the possibility of returning to it. Review by Jacob Charles Wilson

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ICA,The Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5AH

Metahaven: VERSION HISTORY

Metahaven, Eurasia (Questions on Happiness) 2018. Installation view of Metahaven: VERSION HISTORY at Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, 3 October - 13 January 2019

For ‘Version History’, their current exhibition at the ICA in London, the collective have brought together three recent films and a digital essay to reflect on the loss of truth that arises from our collective immersion in digital technologies. Review by Bernard Hay

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Victoria Miro, 14 St George St, Mayfair, London W1S 1FH

Ilse D’Hollander

Untitled

In much the same way as Francesca Woodman though, whose early death at the age of just 22 has made her into something of a cult figure, D’Hollander’s paintings are cast in the shadow of her personal history. Review by Claire Phillips

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Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, St James's, London SE14 6AD

Kris Lemsalu: 4Life

Kris Lemsalu, Holy Hell O (2018).

For her first solo exhibition in London, ‘4LIFE’, multidisciplinary artist Kris Lemsalu transforms the upstairs galleries at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art into a supernatural realm, occupied with otherworldly, absurdist characters that guide you through stages of birth, life and death. Review by Julia Schouten

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Vanessa Billy: Future Perfect

Vanessa Billy, Future Perfect, installation view

Post-apocalyptic in tone, this set of interconnected works further develops themes of nature and transformation, concerns at the core of Billy’s practice. Consisting of new pieces and site specific interventions, the exhibition speculates on a future where science has radical consequences on the environment and living species within it.

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Plymouth College of Art, Tavistock Pl, Plymouth PL4 8AT

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency installation view

Simon Bayliss’ exhibition, Meditations in an Emergency, is an exhibition of multitudes, crossing from pottery and electronic music to watercolour landscapes, poetry and performative film. The show by is a marriage of the seemingly incongruous, such as the neon sign alternating SIMON BAYLISS / SIN ON GAY BLISS reflecting on the glazing of his pottery. It is a joining, as the words inscribed on the pot reads, of ‘high and low with one another’. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Campoli Presti, 223 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 0EL

Rochelle Feinstein: Rainbow Room / The Year in Hate

Rochelle Feinstein, Rainbow Room (diptych), 2018. Diptych, Acrylic, embroidery and collage on canvas

Bringing together a new body of work created this past year, the exhibition makes two opposing propositions, each one presented in one of the gallery’s two rooms. The propositions are based two formal devices: the rainbow and the calendar. Review by Edmée Lepercq

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Humber Street Gallery, 64 Humber St, Hull HU1 1TU

Jamie Reid: XXXXX: Fifty Years of Subversion and the Spirit

Jamie Reid: XXXXX: Fifty Years of Subversion and the Spirit installation view

Raised as a socialist and a druid and initiated into political activism at a young age, Jamie Reid blames his parents for his rebellious streak; which at the age of 71, shows no sign of abating. The self-described anarchist uses iconoclastic collages and seditious ransom note-style idioms to marshal a cultural insurgence against the status quo; while his kaleidoscopic paintings reject materialism and individualism through a meditative connection with nature. Review by Christopher Little

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Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, Via Chiese, 2, 20126 Milano MI, Italy

Mario Merz: Igloos

Mario Merz, "Igloos", exhibition view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, 2018

Curated by Vicente Todolí, Pirelli HangarBicocca Milan is currently presenting the iconic Igloos of Mario Merz (1925–2003) - a key figure of Arte Povera, and considered to be one of the most important post-war Italian artists; the exhibition brings together his most iconic oeuvre of work, the igloos, which date from 1968 until the end of the artist’s life. Review by Paul Black

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Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1S 1BP

Sean Scully: Uninsideout

Sean Scully, What Makes Us, 2017

The show provides an interesting point of entry to the work of this Irish-born American-based painter. Split across two rooms, ‘Uninsideout’ asks us to focus on the musicality of Scully’s work; the artist is quoted as saying ‘one stripe is a note, many are a chord, all are played by hand.’ Review by Clare Robson

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