Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Humber Street Gallery, 64 Humber St, Hull HU1 1TU

Aniara Omann: Equanipolis

Installation view, 2019. Aniara Omann, Equanipolis. Courtesy of Humber Street Gallery and the artist, 2019. Photo by Jules Lister.

In ‘Equanipolis', Aniara Omann has created two distinct yet coherent spaces. The Glasgow-based artist uses sculpture, textiles and animatronics to–in the tradition of science fiction–imagine the forms which might populate a version of our future where, according to the gallery’s information, “the boundary between symbol and material is blurred”. Review by Lucy Holt

Further reading +

New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham NG7 6BE

John Akomfrah: Mimesis: African Soldier

The Journey, Mimesis: African Soldier

The opening titles to John Akomfrah’s ‘Mimesis: African Soldier’ (2018) state that “six million colonial subjects fought and served in the Great War” and that three-hundred and fifty-thousand died in Europe. Akomfrah’s three-screen installation interweaves archival footage with new material that commemorates those conscripted into the First World War by colonial powers, to fight for a cause not their own. Review by Joshua Lockwood-Moran

Further reading +

mother's tankstation London, 58 - 64 Three Colts Ln, Bethnal Green, London E2 6GP

Yuri Pattison: to-do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶

Yuri Pattison, installation view, to do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶, mother’s tankstation London, Chip Scale Atomic Clock promotional video (Super SloMo waifu2x rework), padlock nightlights

Layers of time, economic systems and environments tightly interconnect in Yuri Pattison’s new exhibition. ‘to-do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶’ explores the narratives embedded in time-based technologies and the very fabric of reality. A combination of existing and newly-made works shows the connection between seemingly unrelated worlds, by turning to the ineffable world of toxins, waves and frequencies. Review by Giulia Civardi

Further reading +

Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Nam June Paik

TV Garden. 1974-1977 (2002) Single-channel video installation with live plants and colour television monitors

Early photographs of Paik at his studio in New York City show him smiling, like a kid in a sweet shop, in a room filled with clutter. The antique technology that blankets the floor arguably appears as rubbish to most. However, to Paik, broken-down technological devices were inspiration. Review by Sheena Carrington

Further reading +

The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield WF1 5AW

Christina Quarles: In Likeness

 Christina Quarles install shots, copyright Nick Singleton

Entering Christina Quarles’ first European exhibition at The Hepworth Wakefield, the viewer is greeted with a number of large-scale paintings and an architectural intervention, which includes a window revealing further works. Quarles’ arresting paintings depict female bodies that stretch, contort and intertwine. They are ambiguous and only barely legible as bodies, found somewhere in the liminal space between depiction and abstraction. Review by Joshua Lockwood-Moran

Further reading +

Central Pavilion, Arsenale, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2019: Jon Rafman: Dream Journal

Dream Journal 2016-2019, 58. Esposizione Internazionale d'Arte - La Biennale di Venezia, May You Live In Interesting Times

The feature film ‘Dream Journal’ presented at the Venice Biennale is the result of three years of exploration into 3D simulated environments (2016-2019). Throughout an extremely dense 94 minutes, Rafman radically experiments with imaginary worlds populated by a plethora of obscene biotech mutants. CGI reveals the dark vitality of techno-materialism that melds post-human forms with chimerical beasts, monstrous insects and Japanese sexual perversions. Review by Piotr Bockowski

Further reading +

Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Susan Hiller: Ghost / TV

Susan Hiller, Ghost / TV, 2019, installation view.

At the time of Susan Hiller’s death earlier this year, she was working on a new show for Matt’s Gallery, the tiny Bermondsey gallery with which she had a decades-long working relationship. The resulting show has come about in collaboration with Hiller’s son, Gabriel Coxhead. Review by Lucy Holt

Further reading +

Belvedere 21, Arsenalstraße 1, 1030 Wien, Austria

Monica Bonvicini: I CANNOT HIDE MY ANGER

Monica Bonvicini. I CANNOT HIDE MY ANGER

Placed in the pavilion designed by Karl Schwanzer, Monica Bonvicini takes over the impressive open-plan ground floor of the Belvedere 21. Bonvicini’s pieces redirect the viewer’s experience towards a performative space that welcomes the outside world, touching on questions of politics and society. Using institutional ways of conditioning her subject, the artist highlights the impact of societal structures. Through her work, Bonvicini reflects on the relationships between this space and the viewer. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +

EMMA – Espoo Museum of Modern Art, Ahertajantie 5, 02100 Espoo, Finland

Tatsuo Miyajima: Sky of Time

Tatsuo Miyajima: Sky of Time, 2019. Sky of Time exhibition 9.10.2019 - 8.3.2020. EMMA -Espoo Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Ari Karttunen/EMMA.

For most of us, numbers allow us to quantify distances, volumes, time and more. The fact that the precise (or imprecise) use of these abstract entities also carries tangible consequences is also commonly known. Few, though, recognise their creative potential. There are only a handful of visual artists who use numbers in their work and Tatsuo Miyajima is one of those rare individuals. Review by John Gayer

Further reading +

Tintype, 107 Essex Rd, Canonbury, London N1 2SL

Michelle Williams Gamaker: Distant Relative

Still from THE ETERNAL RETURN, 2019, 17mins, HD Video, black and white, sound

In January 2018, Michelle Williams Gamaker travelled across the pond to Los Angeles, California and reached a new level of obsessive fandom. Dressed in a brown taffeta cocktail dress, Jackie O-style sunglasses and gold sparkly stilettos, she made the trek through the 300-acre Forest Lawn Memorial Park - ‘cemetery to the stars’ - to locate the grave of Indian-born, Hollywood studio era film star Sabu. Despite her efforts to connect with the star, for whom Williams Gamaker has a deep affinity, she was eventually discovered by security and ordered to leave, although not without first putting up a good fight. ‘... it’s just that I’m a distant relative,’ she protested. Review by Alex White

Further reading +

PEER, 97 & 99 Hoxton Street, London N1 6QL

OUT OF SHAPE

Out of Shape at PEER – Kate Howard, Pop Pop Pop Pop, 2019 (foreground); Kate Howard, Hysterical Prosthetic, 2019 (background left); Greta Davies, Gothic Door, 2019 (right); Greta Davies Studio Window, 2019 (background right).

It is an important moment for PEER as it is enters its fourth year of collaborating with Acme – a career programme enabling young artists to establish themselves and their approaches towards their future profession. This year the exhibition consists of large installations by three women graduates from London based MA courses – Greta Davies, Kate Howard and Marylyn Molisso. Their work touches on notions of experience, temporality and embodiment, as it interweaves with the gallery spaces, as well as the physical presence of other objects. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +

Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St, Denver, CO 80202, United States

Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation

Francesca Woodman, Portrait of a Reputation, installation view, MCA Denver

‘Portrait of a Reputation’ at the Museum of Contemporary Art highlights the body’s exceptional ability to make connections with the world. The body acts as a mediator between the self and our environment allowing us to move, to create bonds, to express our feelings, and most importantly, to experience the world. Viewers are allowed to create an experience for themselves through their presence, while simultaneously experiencing the past life of artist, Francesca Woodman. Review by Kandice Cleveland

Further reading +

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, West Bretton, Wakefield WF4 4LG

Holly Hendry: The Dump is Full of Images

Holly Hendry, Slacker, 2019.

Holly Hendry’s new exhibition at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park features three pieces: ‘Amulet’, ‘Borgorgysmus’, and, clinking quietly and hugely in the centre of the room, the 7.5m-long ‘Slacker’. ‘Slacker’ is Hendry’s first moving sculpture, and as the exhibition’s centrepiece it presents a remarkable evolution of her thinking around the tensions between inside and outside, value and waste, viscera and machinery. Each of the three pieces of the exhibition reveal their innards, unearth things bodily and fabricated, in what comprises a rich exploration of the act of making, and the stuff that arises in the process. Review by Harriet Smith Hughes

Further reading +

The New Art Gallery Walsall, Gallery Square, Walsall WS2 8LG

Amalia Pica: Private & Confidential

Amalia Pica, Private & Confidential, 20 September 2019 - 2 February 2020, The New Art Gallery Walsall

Walking into ‘Private & Confidential’ the viewer is first overwhelmed by masses of laminated A4 sheets, covering every wall of the gallery. This is the first time that ‘Joy in Paperwork, The Archive’ (2016) has been exhibited in its entirety in the UK. Created whilst Amalia Pica, an Argentian artist based in London, was applying for UK citizenship in 2016, the archive consists of sheets sprawling with authoritarian stamps that become abstracted and subverted – no longer (de)legitimising paperwork but adorning it. Review by Emily Hale

Further reading +