Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Patrick Goddard: Trip to Eclipse

Patrick Goddard, Trip To Eclipse (2020), installation shot.

‘Trip To Eclipse’ is a new installation by Patrick Goddard, exhibited at Matt’s Gallery following his participation in the Blackrock Residency in 2016, a collaboration between the gallery and the Lydney Park Estate. The title is a reference to a 1990s clothing label, which was more popular amongst children and teens than the actual rave culture it proposed to represent. Think: bomber jackets and ultra-baggy jeans, graffiti and spliffs. Review by Chris Hayes

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Lauren Gault: C I T H R A

Lauren Gault, C I T H R A, 2020. Installation view. Commissioned by Gasworks.

Lauren Gault’s exhibition ‘C I T H R A’ at Gasworks, London, is a show of strange encounters. The installation continues the artist’s interest in the possibilities of materials, using ‘sculptural language as a connective tissue’ for her wider research. Review by Tess Charnley

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Blvd, Nottingham NG7 6BE

Shezad Dawood: Encroachments

Encroachments, Production stills, 2019

Shezad Dawood’s exhibition is overrun with multi-coloured terrazzo. The walls are plastered with garish speckles, which seep into paintings, prints, plinths and even the exhibition guide. The terrazzo, designed by Dawood, gives the display a Pop-y veneer, strengthened by visual allusions to Robert Rauschenberg’s collages and Andy Warhol’s silkscreens, as well as tributes to the arcade game, Space Invaders. Review by Julia Schouten

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LOOCK Galerie, Potsdamer Strasse 63, DE 10785 Berlin

Christian Borchert: Familienporträts

Familienporträts by Christian Borchert at Loock, Berlin

Christian’s Borchert’s ‘Familienporträts’ pull the viewer in off the cold West Berlin street, into a position of a post-Cold War voyeur; peering into the domestic situations of individual families who lived through the DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik) and then what became of them after. Review by Nicola Jeffs

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Spike Island, 133 Cumberland Rd, Bristol BS1 6UX

Pacita Abad: Life in the Margins

Life in the Margins (2020) Installation view, Spike Island, Bristol

The riot of full-bodied exuberance currently filling the spaces of Spike Island sits in welcome contrast to this colourless English January. Dividing up the space of the gallery, hang twenty or so large quilted canvases that froth with vivid colour, dense paintwork, and detailed needlework by Filipina-American, Pacita Abad (1946–2004). Review by Lizzie Lloyd

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SPACE Ilford, 10 Oakfield Road, Ilford, IG1 1ZJ

Lindsey Mendick: Regrets, I’ve Had a Few

Lindsey Mendick: Regrets, I've Had A Few, 2019. Mixed media installation including: ceramics, paint and fabric.

Many of the works comprising Lindsey Mendick’s exhibition are the culmination of a series of ceramic workshops she led for Ilford-based over 65 year-olds, including over 70 ceramic sculptures – ranging from Dorothy Gale-style red stilettos and a bird bath, elaborately decorated vases and colourful crockery, fabric clad angel figurines and anthropomorphic animals at sail in a fictional sea – together with painted wall murals, fabric banners, and sculptural display structures. The show marks the grand opening of the new SPACE Studios in Ilford situated in the rear of the Town Hall. Review by Tyler Woolcott

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Southard Reid, 7 Royalty Mews, London W1D 3AS

Prem Sahib: Descent II. Cul-de-Sac

Prem Sahib, Archive, 2019, wood, painted steel, acrylic, archival material belonging to Kamaljit Sahib.

Sheena Carrington reviews the second of a three part exhibition by Prem Sahib titled 'Descent', a project with an overarching narrative that explores socio-political architectures and acts of resistance.

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Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin

Derek Jarman: PROTEST!

The Garden

The vast scale of work on show is what grips you first when entering ‘PROTEST!’, the Derek Jarman retrospective at Dublin’s Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA). It spans the entirety of IMMA’s West Wing, comprising 11 rooms, a number of alcoves and two long, connecting corridors. The show displays works from the four decades of Jarman’s career, beginning in the late-50s, as he entered King’s College London, through to the ‘90s and his untimely death in 1994 from an AIDS-related illness aged just 52. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Vivian Suter: Tintin’s Sofa

Vivian Suter, Tintin’s Sofa, installation view, Camden Arts Centre.

The dramatic arrangement of works suggests the organic and vegetal profusion of a complex living system such as a rainforest. This is a deliberate echo of the rainforests which surround Vivian Suter’s lakeside studio in Guatemala – a place that plays a fundamental role in the making and meaning of the artist’s work, and which leaves its physical traces on her paintings. Review by Anna Souter

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Kohta, Teurastamo, Työpajankatu 2, 00580 Helsinki, Finland

Lili Dujourie

Ballade - Althea

Lili Dujourie’s exhibition at Kohta briefly touches on three different decades of the Belgian artist’s career. Given the works generally subdued character and their limited number, they are remarkably cogent and confirm Dujourie’s intellectual restlessness. The selection here draws attention to Dujourie’s resolve to experiment and keep experimenting with different media and intellectual approaches. At Kohta, the proof of this encompasses a sculptural installation, a black and white video and a group of small paper-based sculptures. Review by John Gayer

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Galeria Le Guern, Katowicka 25, 03-932 Warszawa, Poland

Alicja Gaskon: Dividing Lines

Dividing Lines, installation

Inspired by her recent trip to the North Korean border, Warsaw-based artist Alicja Gaskon presents ‘Dividing Lines’: a physical and conceptual representation of the most prominent boundaries through history. From North Korea to the Berlin Wall, and more recently, Trump’s wall, Gaskon’s inquiry accentuates the absence of ethical consideration within the rationale of national preservation. Review by Elaine Y.J Zheng

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

Tai Shani: Tragodía

Tai Shani, Tragodia, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. Photograph by Kasia Kaminska

Blue is the first thing that greets you at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. An inviting blue covers the gallery’s exterior windows, providing privacy to those inside. Beyond the blue, as it does on the visible spectrum of light, lies violet. This warm shade of lavender wraps itself around the internal walls and dominates the gallery floor via a large and continuous sculpture in the same hue. Beyond violet on the visible spectrum lies ultraviolet, the invisible, the mystical. In Tai Shani’s ‘Tragodía’ this movement through colour is represented by a virtual reality play which requires special eyewear to view. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Frans Hals Museum, Groot Heiligland 62; Haarlem, Netherlands

Marianna Simnett: My Broken Animal

The Needle and the Larynx (video still)

I must treat everything as a given. As such, it seems necessary to accept that Marianna Simnett’s exhibition at the Frans Hals Museum feels like two distinct shows packaged into one on purpose. In taking this rupture seriously, the question would then be, why? What does the two-in-one form do here? With the first body comprised of two works from 2016 and the second of four from 2019, a separation along the lines of the chronological is a start. Review by Isabelle Sully

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Museum of Cycladic Art, Neofitou Douka 4, Athens 106 74, Greece

Lynda Benglis: In the Realm of the Senses, Presented by NEON

Lynda Benglis: In the Realm of the Senses, Installation view copyright Panos Kokkinias Courtesy NEON

I’ve never seen Lynda Benglis’s work look more relevant than scattered around an opulent Neo-Classical mansion in the shadow of the Acropolis. The Stathatos Mansion is a slave to taste and style, determinedly emulating the great villas of the past, and Benglis’s sculpture is its total opposite. It’s bold, it’s bombastic, even vulgar at times, and unlike Neo-Classicism, never conventional, not even for a second. Review by William Summerfield

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