Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

The Fruitmarket Gallery, 45 Market St, Edinburgh EH1 1DF

Jac Leirner: Add It Up

Jac Leirner, Add It Up, installation view The Fruitmarket Gallery 2017.

Leirner’s works frequently organise and repurpose slight ephemera into a surprising coalescence. Whilst the career-wide spectrum of activity on display successfully demonstrates the consistent concerns within her oeuvre, the volume of works within this cross-section seems at odds with their essential simplicity, which at times is perhaps diluted in the two satiated galleries. Review by Nathan Anthony

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Talbot Rice Gallery, University of Edinburgh, South Bridge, Edinburgh EH8 9YL

Stephen Sutcliffe: Sex Symbols in Sandwich Signs

Stephen Sutcliffe, Sex Symbols in Sandwich Signs (2017). Installation view.

Stephen Sutcliffe’s exhibition at Talbot Rice Gallery opens a moving image season showcasing recent work by three highly-regarded practitioners noted for the referential density of their work, through an ever-closing margin between documentary and fiction and manifested through exuberant styles. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Centro de Cultura Contemporânea de Castelo Branco, Campo Mártires da Pátria, S/N (Devesa) 097, 6000 Castelo Branco, Portugal

Cristina Rodrigues

Installation view, Cristina Rodrigues

Cristina Rodrigues’ retrospective at Centro de Cultura Contemporânea in Castelo Branco sits well in the historic Portuguese town that boasts of a rich and varied textile heritage. While reviving the declining age-old tradition, Rodrigues brings into the mix a cross-cultural confluence that bring to the fore diverse contemporary concerns. Review by Ambika Rajgopal

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The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield, West Yorkshire WF1 5AW

Howard Hodgkin: Painting India

Installation image of Howard Hodgkin: Painting India, 1 July - 8 Oct 2017 at The Hepworth Wakefield.

In his paintings of India – great, gestural strokes of colour – Howard Hodgkin sought to show the fleeting moments and conversations that form an impression of a place. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome

Installation view at the Whitechapel Gallery, Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome (7 June - 10 September 2017)

‘The Trickle-Down Syndrome’ is a large-scale installation, which consists of five interconnected yet individual rooms, inspired both by 1930s backdrops of Hollywood director Busby Berkeley and the Surrealist works of Max Ernst. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Bermondsey Square, London

Lucy Tomlins: Pylon and Pier

Lucy Tomlins, Pylon and Pier, 2017. SCULPTURE AT Bermondsey Square.

In between the glass-fronted perimeters of Bermondsey Square, on the tiled ground, stands an empty plinth. This robust hexagon, coated a light beige to match the innocuous colour scheme of the commercial properties, could well be a part of the developer’s vision. It is sympathetic to the clusters of metal octadecahedron inevitably installed to add interest and dynamism to an otherwise anaesthetised square. Cleo Roberts reviews.

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Kavi Gupta, 835 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago, IL 60607

Glenn Kaino: Sign

 Installation view of Sign, 2017

In his upcoming exhibition, Sign, at Kavi Gupta, Chicago, Glenn Kaino directly challenges the signifiers of colonial action: objects which encode the terms of traversal, demarcate ownership, and crystallize territory into the social contract. Maps, flags, signs, and peace agreements all have one thing in common, they are symbolic markers of man’s assertion of his ownership of his world.

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Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London, SE5 7RW

Eva Gold: A Bead of Sweat, Stilled

Drawing on a broad framework of cinematic references, for her upcoming exhibition at Lily Brooke, Eva Gold presents an installation comprising several individual sculptures. Situated within a broader exploration of filmic spaces, Gold here extends her analysis of the cinematic landscape as memory site.

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Trajal Harrell: Hoochie Koochie, A performance exhibition

The Return of La Argentina, Trajal Harrell: Hoochie Koochie, A performance exhibition, Barbican Art Gallery, London

Enter into the Barbican’s gallery space, and an audience is huddled around a trio of young male dancers in loose, draped clothing, shuffling on tiptoe and making gentle reaching arm movements. Evie Ward reviews Trajal Harrell: Hoochie Koochie, A performance exhibition.

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Chewday's, 139 Lambeth Walk, London, SE11 3EE

Bryan Dooley: Public Death

Bryan Dooley, NP, 2016 [detail]

Public Death is the theatrical result of Bryan Dooley's research into dormant patents, currently owned by Google, designed to move data farms out to sea. Dooley’s installation plays on themes of circulation, cultural signification, technological progress, and inevitable disaster.

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ

Yuri Pattison: user, space

Yuri Pattison, user, space (2016). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2016. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Courtesy of the artist; mother's tankstation limited, Dublin; Helga Maria Klosterfelde, Berlin; and Labor, Mexico.

A long table surrounded by Ikea-style chairs runs through the centre of the gallery, while in one corner, a separate environment for relaxing houses oversized cushions and shelves of plants. And everywhere, there is the physical manifestation of tech: wires, adapters, servers, computers, and cameras, creating a cacophony of noise that hums throughout the installation. Review by William Rees

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Victoria Miro Mayfair, 14 St George Street, London W1S 1FE

Kara Walker: Go to Hell or Atlanta, Whichever Comes First

 Go to Hell or Atlanta, Whichever Comes First, Installation view

The facelessness interrupts personal empathy, forcing the viewer to observe from a distance. There is no possibility for intervention, we are powerless and we have failed. Benjamin Murphy responds to Kara Walker's current exhibition at Victoria Miro Mayfair.

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Barbican, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop

 Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop 9 October 2015 - 10 January 2016

The spine of the exhibition is ‘Revolution’ - a 30-minute video displayed on five monitors throughout the gallery and accompanied by a live choreographed performance. This mash up of dancers in a studio performing strong, synchronised choreography, Kool FM DJs jamming to Drum & Bass and Peake family home videos dictates the throbbing, erratic rhythm that permeates the space. Review by Alex Borkowski

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