Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Libita Clayton: Quantum Ghost

Libita Clayton, Quantum Ghost, 2019. Installation view.

For Libita Clayton’s first UK solo show the artist presents ‘Quantum Ghost’, an interlinked two-part encounter with the politics inherent to her familial heritage and the journey it took to give agency to its legacy. Review by Sophie Risner

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Ghislaine Leung: CONSTITUTION

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery evades concise summation. Description becomes easily lost in particularities, or overlooks specific works altogether. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, 521 W 21st St #1, New York, NY 10011, USA

Laura Lima : I hope this finds you well.

Nomad

Brazilian artist Laura Lima’s work has infamously flouted even the most provisional classifications art discourses run on today, let alone the traditional ones. Based in Rio de Janeiro, and initially spurred on by interests in law and philosophy, Lima continues to cultivate a body of work that builds on post-relational art concerns and the aesthetic, if not political, principles espoused by the fallout of the Brazilian Neo-Concrete Movement, in both theory and practice. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 118 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen

Cecilia Vicuna: About to Happen, February 1 – March 31, 2019, installation view, Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. Photos: Constance Mensh

Cecilia Vicuña’s first major solo exhibition presents a delicate balancing act between the large- and small-scale, and between works that are explicitly political and those that are more personal. Combining textiles, video, found objects, wood, paper, poetry, and more, ‘About to Happen’ is grounded in the artist’s dedication to her craft and to her advocacy, often making the most impact with the most intimate, fragile works. Review by Deborah Krieger

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Kohta, Teurastamo inner yard, Työpajankatu 2B, building 7, 3rd floor, 00580 Helsinki, Finland

Britta Marakatt-Labba: History in Stitches

Britta Marakatt-Labba:Untitled (2018-19), textile, embroidery

How strange to step from snow-filled streets and the twilight of a late winter afternoon in Helsinki into Kohta’s radiant space and find oneself confronted by scenes executed in similarly atmospheric and subdued tones. Looking reveals an unfamiliar world, fashioned by Britta Marakatt-Labba’s unique cultural background and artistic approach. Review by John Gayer

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Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

Raqs Media Collective, Not Yet At Ease, 2018. Modular padded structure with fabric ceiling, padded stools. Six videos displayed on four monitors and two projections, six channel audio. Dimensions variable.

‘Spinal’, Raqs Media Collective's exhibition at Frith Street Gallery, features the installation ‘Not Yet At Ease’. It reflects on the mental state created by the discomfort and exploitation of First World War soldiers of Asian heritage. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

Mariana Castillo Deball: Finding Oneself Outside

Mariana Castillo Deball, Nuremberg Map of Tenochtitlan, 2013. Installation view: Preis der Nationalgalerie fur Junge Kunst, Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum fur Gegenwart, Berlin, 2013.

Mexican-born, Berlin-based multimedia artist Mariana Castillo Deball’s practice interrogates the junctures between fields of knowledge as disparate as archaeology, anthropology, material culture, art and history. More specifically, Castillo Deball’s works probe into the hows and whys of objects transformed – (re-)activated, granted agency, even fetishized – into art objects, with all due implications. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NJ

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83 installation view

The sun-soaked palette of Rauschenberg’s home on Captiva Island in Florida, where he settled in 1970, is injected into works like Lipstick (Spread) (1981), with its crimson umbrella and smear of bubble-gum pink. Umbrellas find their way back into another highlight of the show, Untitled (Spread) (1982), where two open parasols like blooming sunflowers bring harmony to a reel of collaged pictures of the American flag, shipping containers and lithe athletes. Review by Claire Phillips

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M100, Søndergade 26, Kld. 5000 Odense C. Denmark

Louise Sparre: Vibrant

Louise Sparre, view of the front room

Louise Sparre’s solo exhibition ‘Vibrant’ is like a journey into the body. It begins with works that refer to the body’s surface, such as ‘Adaption’ and ’Fabric Object’, which respectively relate to the skin and the vagina as border areas between outer world and inner body. Text by Mette Kjærgaard Præst

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Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2PH

Jeff Koons

Gazing Ball (Rubens Tiger Hunt)

There’s a frustrating quote from Jeff Koons in the catalogue accompaniment to a new exhibition of his artwork at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. “I’ve tried to make work,” it says, “that any viewer, no matter where they came from […] would have to say that on some level “Yes, I like it.” If they couldn’t do that, it would only be because they had been told they were not supposed to.” Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Emmie McLuskey: these were the things that made the step familiar

these were the things that made the step familiar, Collective, 2019

The eight large scale screen print collages, audio works, printed matter and gymnastic ‘furniture' that make up Glasgow-based artist Emmie McLuskey's installation at Collective look at the shared poetics of the filmmaker and choreographer by analysing, describing and recording the body, through its interactions and its gestures, between rest and motion. Review by Alex Hetherington

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25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Cécile B. Evans: AMOS’ WORLD

Cecile B. Evans, AMOS' WORLD, Tramway (2019).

‘AMOS’ WORLD’ is a highly staged, three-part, telepathic and narcissistic TV soap opera, strewn with the vernacular of a therapy session and the persuasive mantras of the executive suite, the property developer and the city planner. Review by Alex Hetherington

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