Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Paradise Works, East Philip Street, Salford, Manchester, M3 7LE

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs installation view

Alongside his artistic practice, Nick Jordan has spent a number of years filming mental health training videos for the University of Manchester’s hospital teaching unit, encountering many cases of ‘disorder’ as a result. This latest body of work, presented at Paradise Works, on the border between Manchester and Salford, responds to one kind of psychosis in particular: a manifestation of schizophrenia known as ‘thought broadcasting’, whereby patients believe that their thoughts are being transmitted and heard by others. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art, Witte de Withstraat 50, 3012 BR Rotterdam, Netherlands

Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition

Irene Kopelman, 77 Colors of a Volcanic Landscape A, B, C (2016) and Puzzle Piece (2012) part of Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art 2018

Stepping into Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, lands one in an ambiguously sparse installation filled with plenty of air and light. Here it takes time to adjust to the presentation’s scope, as some of the works offer bare whispers of visual information that are delicately precise representations that cannot be grasped in a few milliseconds. Review by John Gayer

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Yorkshire Sculpture Park, West Bretton, Wakefield WF4 4LG

Giuseppe Penone: A Tree in the Wood

Luce e ombra (detail)

The use of wood, twigs and leaves in his work seems to recall Penone’s artistic output of the 60s and 70s, as part of the Italian art movement ‘Arte Povera’ (Poor Art), which placed an emphasis on the use of throwaway materials. However, today, Penone does not shy away from monumentalizing mediums. Review by Kristina Foster

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New College, Oxford, Holywell St, Oxford OX1 3BN

Emily Young

Midnight Head

Born into a family of writers, artists and politicians, British Sculptor Emily Young found an affinity to sculpting from an early age; influenced by her grandmother, the sculptor Kathleen Scott, a colleague of Auguste Rodin and widow of the explorer Captain Scott of the Antarctic. Review by Paul Black

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The Bluecoat, School Ln, Liverpool L1 3BX

Emma Smith: Euphonia

Emma Smith: Euphonia installation view

Gradually, our eyes make way for our ears: we attune ourselves to an aural experience rather than the anticipated visual encounter. Harmonies and melodic rhythms all glide – and bounce – their way across the installation. Review by Selina Oakes

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Cabinet Gallery, 132 Tyers St, Lambeth, London SE11 5HS

Ed Atkins: Olde Food

Ed Atkins Installation view, Olde Food, Cabinet, London, 22 April - 2 June 2018

Olde Food has a surface but no nourishing inner content; credits to a film are shown that never started nor did it ever have a core narrative or story; a soaked and constantly crying man looks for sympathy from the viewer, without the capacity to learn there is none forthcoming. Review by Matthew Turner

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IMT Gallery, 2, 210 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9NQ

Maggie Roberts: Glimmer Breach

Maggie Roberts: Glimmer Breach Installation view

Roberts is tapping into the current zeitgeist around post-human or extra-human forms of intelligence via specific texts, fauna and digital tools. Whilst there are many artists working with and around these now, along with Roberts, it is her method of ‘fictioning’ and the open-ended, discursive nature of her work that elevates her current exhibition, Glimmer Breach, at IMT Gallery. Review by Lauren Velvick

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Edel Assanti, 74A Newman St, Fitzrovia, London W1T 3DB

Noémie Goudal: Telluris

Noemie Goudal: Telluris installation view

Noémie Goudal’s photographs are full of unsettled contradiction. The product of constructions, they lie between truth and fiction, the ancient and the new, managing to be both unified and fragmented, existing in a state of instability. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Plymouth Arts Centre, 38 Looe St, Plymouth PL4 0EB and Plymouth College of Art, Tavistock Pl, Plymouth PL4 8AT 

History Painting: Rose Wylie

History Painting: Rose Wylie installation view

It seems near impossible to refer to the style of a Rose Wylie painting without mentioning the word childlike. Even on canvas, brush-strokes and mixes of paint still carry the instinctive childlike motion of the impulsive hand that struck them there. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Transfer Gallery, 1030 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life installation view

Contrary to the exhibition’s title, which suggests a state of stasis, Holberton’s work oscillates between analogue and digital, animate and inanimate, in order to destablise the notion of these binaries, and explore the possibility of a third space. Review by Grace Storey

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Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Charlemont House, Parnell Square North, Dublin 1, D01 F2X9, Ireland

Amanda Dunsmore: Keeper

Amanda Dunsmore, John Hume, 2005; installation view, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

In light of seismic political events, and the failed attempts to square the circle that is the Irish Border, Amanda Dunsmore’s exhibition ‘Keeper’ in Dublin’s Hugh Lane seems increasingly vital and brings the Good Friday Agreement into sharper focus. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Rd, London NW3 6DG

Sadie Benning: Sleep Rock

Hotel Fashion

When I first saw Sadie Benning’s ground-breaking ‘cut and paste’ video work in the early 1990s, with their cool soundtracks and deadpan narrations, it was clear that here was an artist who was ahead of their time and whose influence can be seen in practices from Mark Leckey to Heather Phillipson. For their first solo exhibition in London, Benning presents new work that continues their interest in autobiography and found imagery which now finds form through a filmic sequence of paintings and collages. Review by Piers Masterson

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Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstraße 7, 10963 Berlin

Covered in Time and History: The Films of Ana Mendieta

Sweating Blood

Ana Mendieta remains a significant artistic figure of the 1970s and 1980s because of her radical practice encompassing performance, gender and geo-political identity. The extensive self-documentation of her performances (which were often enacted alone) on primarily Super 8 film has allowed for her works to survive to this day. Review by Joan Lee

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Yto Barrada: Agadir

Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View with performers Nick Armfield, Rory Francis, Tallulah Bond and Jonny Lavelle, Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View, The Curve, Barbican Centre, 7 February - 20 May 2018

Commissioned by the Barbican as part of the ‘Art of Change’ programme, Moroccan-born artist Yto Barrada has taken over the Curve gallery with a display of loss, separation and re-emergence. Referencing the novel ‘Agadir’ by Mohammed Khaïr Eddine, the artist reworks the spinal layout of the gallery as a fragmented timeline. Using photography, film, performance and collage, Barrada guides us through a history of colonialism, political subversion and the failure of a Modernist architectural utopia, all wrapped up in an event – an earthquake – that all but destroyed the city in fifteen seconds in 1960. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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