Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

De La Warr Pavilion, Marina, Bexhill-on-Sea TN40 1DP

Simon Patterson: Safari: an exhibition as expedition

Simon Patterson, rehearsal of Seascape, 2017, with Bexhill Sailing Club

Simon Patterson’s ‘An Exhibition As Expedition’ takes you on a discursive and peripatetic journey, one which is immaterially played out in the mind of the visitor as they traverse the De Le Warr Pavilion. While doing this the artist sets out to undermine traditional bodies of 'stable' knowledge such as maps, museums and archives. Suggesting that meanings, not just in the world of art, are always in a state of shape shifting flux and that truth is just another strange sub-genre of fiction. Review by Matthew Turner

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Scotland Pavilion, Chiesa di Santa Caterina, Fondamenta Santa Caterina, 30121, Cannaregio

Venice Biennale 2017: Rachel Maclean: Spite Your Face

Installation view, Rachel Maclean, Spite Your Face, 2017.

The large portrait format screen in place of the altar of the deconsecrated church creates an ambience of a religious service and the audience are made to sit in pews. Maclean's previous work has taken Old Testament stories retelling them as contemporary fables that poked fun at cults and fads. 'Spite Your Face' presents the story of Pinocchio – one of those children's tales that having only known from the cleaned up Disney version is far darker than I assumed. Review by Piers Masterson

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Estonia Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, San Samuele Square, San Marco 3199, 2nd floor, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2017: Katja Novitskova: If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes

Katja Novitskova, If Only You Could See What I've Seen with Your Eyes, exhibition view at the Estonian Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, 57th Venice Bienniale

Outside the entrance of the Estonian Pavilion in the 57th Venice Biennale, the phrase ‘If only you could see what I’ve seen with your eyes’ is printed on a poster in glowing red type. Katja Novitskova’s exhibition title originates from the 1982 post-apocalyptic film ‘Blade Runner’ and points toward several themes that run throughout the exhibition. Review by Ashley Janke

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Turner Contemporary, Rendezvous, Margate, Kent CT9 1HG

Michael Armitage and Phyllida Barlow: Every Day is a New Day

Phyllida Barlow, installation view, Turner Contemporary

‘Every Day is a New Day’ is comprised of two solo shows, and as such comparisons are inevitable. Different as the work of Phyllida Barlow and Michael Armitage are – in medium, in scale, in cultural and social preoccupations – it is difficult to get away from the sense that one is being led through a critical narrative. Review by Benedict Hawkins

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Klein Sun Gallery, 525 W 22nd St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Ji Zhou: Real Illusion

Ji Zhou, Greenhouse 2, 2017, archival pigment print, 110 x 250 cm

Moving between imagined and inhabited geographies, the artist suggests that our grasp on the tangible world is a tendentious fiction. Review by Tausif Noor

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Vienna Secession Friedrichstraße 12, 1010 Vienna

Alex Da Corte

Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view

For his first major solo exhibition in Europe, Alex Da Corte has created a new work for the Vienna Secession.

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Olga Korper Gallery, 17 Morrow Avenue Toronto M6R 2H9, Canada

Paterson Ewen

Installation view, Paterson Ewen, Olga Korper Gallery

Apart from a single lithographic print, the exhibition presents pieces that were all produced during the 1990s, and together they powerfully illustrate the artist’s interest in space, astronomy, cosmic events, and the phenomenal relationship between our physical world and the celestial environment that surrounds it. Review by Emma Rae Warburton

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Victoria Miro Gallery, 16 Wharf Road, London N1 7RW

Isaac Julien: “I dream a world” Looking for Langston

Installation view, Isaac Julien: "I dream a world" Looking for Langston

Julien’s visually arresting installation is luminous and large-scale, a combination of text, documentation and photography. Most notable are the sizeable prints of well-dressed, handsome characters from his film. However, to stop at that would mean to miss the self-determinism of his subject and process. Review by Joan Lee

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Gary Tatintsian Gallery, Serebryanicheskaya naberezhnaya 19, Art House, Moscow 109028

Peter Halley

In his latest exhibition, at Gary Tatintsian Gallery, Moscow, Peter Halley examines the complexity and scale of urban structures unique to his native New York as well as diagramming the city’s systems of movement and communication.

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Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby Street, Vancouver BC V6Z 2H7

Elad Lassry

Fringe

The first major exhibition of Los Angeles-based multidisciplinary artist Elad Lassry in Canada.

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Annka Kultys Gallery, 472 Hackney Rd, Unit 3, 1st Floor, London E2 9EQ

Signe Pierce: Faux Realities

Installation view 2017, Signe Pierce, Annka Kultys

“This is where it all started,” Signe Pierce points toward a lone print of a silhouetted palm tree that has somehow managed to wrangle free from the infinite scroll of neon-soaked imagery expanding across the walls of Annka Kultys Gallery for her ‘Faux Realities’ exhibition. Review by Alice Bucknell

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