Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

narrative projects, 110 New Cavendish Street, Fitzrovia, London W1W 6XR

Rachel Lowe: SPLIT

Rachel Lowe, Split, 2020, 4 channel video projection, sound

Eighty black and white slides, created from found photographs of assorted different women, are projected chronologically so as to suggest the life of one individual woman. Having removed the central section, where the female subject should be, from each photograph, the re-assembled images now possess a vertical seam running down their centres. The physical incision enacted upon the images does not remove the woman's presence entirely, leaving the fictional "Elizabeth" of the title, somehow present and absent at the same time. Find out more about Rachel Lowe: SPLIT at narrative projects.

Further reading +

Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Julijonas Urbonas: Planet of People

A Planet of People, Collective, 2020

Julijonas Urbonas is an artist, a designer, the former head of an amusement park, a researcher, and the founder of the Lithuanian Space Agency - an organisation dedicated to the investigation of imaginary celestial architectural projects. For his exhibition at Collective, Urbonas has created a new iteration of ‘Planet of People’: an evolving participatory installation that explores what would happen if, instead of humans colonising existing planets, there was a planet made entirely of human bodies. Review by Clare Robson

Further reading +

Mother’s Tankstation, 31-43 Watling St, Usher's Island, The Liberties, Dublin 8, D08 NP48, Ireland

Niamh O’Malley: Placeholder

Park shapes

The first work you encounter on entering mother’s tankstation to see Niamh O’Malley’s ‘Placeholder’ is ‘Gather’ (2019), a balance of strength and delicacy with its coloured glass cuboids that are pierced and supported by a steel bar. This is the only ‘old’ work in this new exhibition and it is hardly old at all having been shown late last year in O’Malley’s ‘handle’ in Dublin’s RHA. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave, Seattle, WA 98104, USA

Agnieszka Polska: Love Bite

What the Sun Has Seen (still)

What if the sun spoke back to the world? Agnieszka Polska’s videos ‘The New Sun’ and ‘What the Sun Has Seen’ (both 2017) conjure this ecological encounter at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle, exhibited for the first time in the U.S. in the exhibition ‘Love Bite’ and curated by Amanda Donnan. Review by Laurel V. McLaughlin

Further reading +

ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Cameron Rowland: 3 & 4 Will. IV c.73

Caption information below

Cameron Rowland’s first solo exhibition in the UK, ‘3 & 4 Will. IV c.73’, uses the provenance of objects, language, and laws, to underscore the artist’s research into the afterlife of slavery. Making various references to cultural theorists such as Saudiya Hartman, the work supports the contention that the abolition of slavery was a nonevent. Review by Sarah Hughes

Further reading +

Charleston House, Firle, Lewes East Sussex BN8 6LL

Shani Rhys James: tea on the sofa, blood on the carpet

Shani Rhys James: tea on the sofa, blood on the carpet, Charleston, 1 February - 19 April 2020

Welsh artist Shani Rhys James’ portraits are brutally honest and emotionally charged. Many of the paintings in the exhibition draw on Rhys James’ childhood memories or explore her uneasy relationship with her mother. In ‘Blue Top’ (2013), the woman is depicted in early middle age, looming large above her small daughter, while in ‘Glass of Water’ (2017), she lies hunched against her pillows after suffering a stroke late in life. In both large paintings, the woman’s dark eyes stare out from the canvas – pupils which, on closer inspection, resolve from black into impasto swirls of purple, blue and green. Review by Anna Souter

Further reading +

John Hansard Gallery, 142-144 Above Bar St, Southampton SO14 7DU

Larry Achiampong: When the Sky Falls

Larry Achiampong, When the Sky Falls, installation image, John Hansard Gallery, 2020.

‘When the Sky Falls’ presents works that explores the concept of Sanko-time, a term coined by Achiampong that is taken from the Ashanti word ‘sankofa’. ‘Sankofa’ is associated with the proverb: "It is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten.” Achiampong’s work is centred on such revisitations, using moments in his past to reflect upon the realities faced by African diasporic communities as a result of colonialism and its enduring legacies. Review by William Rees

Further reading +

The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Gabriel Kuri: spending static to save gas

spending static to save gas, 2020, installation view

There is a comforting routine to visiting exhibitions in Dublin’s Douglas Hyde Gallery - you enter the foyer and walk past the main desk to the top of the staircase, which gives a sweeping preview of the work as you descend into the gallery’s main space, your foot hitting the same spot each time. This comfort has been removed by Gabriel Kuri’s radical structural intervention ‘spending static to save gas’ (2020), featured in his exhibition of the same name. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

Bosse & Baum, Unit BGC, Ground Floor, Bussey Building, 133 Rye Lane, SE15 4ST

Candida Powell-Williams: The Gates of Apophenia

Candida Powell-Williams, Gates of Apophenia, installation view, Bosse & Baum, 2019.

Candida Powell-Williams’ installation, at Bosse & Baum in South London, feels like a series of frustrated movements: you move into, through, and around; there are loops that fail to revolve. The show is based on the tarot, and these movements act as invocations to interpret, and to delve into the symbols at play. In the way of both movement and interpretation, the idea of resolution is repeatedly engaged and refused in kind. Review by Harriet Smith Hughes

Further reading +

Kettle's Yard, Castle St, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Linderism

Glorification de l'Elue

Beyond the punk façade of the artist known just as ‘Linder’, there is an intricate weaver of narratives and miner of myths to be found. Kettle’s Yard’s sensory and expansive retrospective makes this apparent. Review by Clare Robson

Further reading +

Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Dora Maar

Dora Maar at Tate Modern, 2019.

Tate Modern here highlights how vast, rich and varied Maar’s work was, over five decades, in striking curatorial choices. It powerfully repairs an injustice in the history of art. Moving chronologically from her first photographs to her experimental return to the dark room, the exhibition displays different phases of a sublime career, kick-started in an iconic place and time: Paris in the 1930s within the Surrealist movement. Review by Melissa Chemam

Further reading +

Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Sung Tieu: In Cold Print

Recruitment Agreements Between Nations, 2015. Subnational Enterprise installation view at Dong Xuan Center, Berlin, 16 May - 13 June, 2015.

Sung Tieu’s new show at Nottingham Contemporary, ‘In Cold Print’ brings to light the physiological aspects of Cold War ideologies by re-contextualizing them in modern day warfare, looking at ideas of weaponry as silent, ghostly or in some way intangible. Review by Lucy Holt

Further reading +

CAN Christina Androulidaki Gallery, Panagiotou Anagnostopoulou 42, Athina 106 73, Greece

Celia Daskopoulou

Untitled

In this extraordinary show, CAN Gallery focuses on paintings of men from the 1980s and 90s by Greek artist Celia Daskopoulou. Like many avant-garde Greek artists Daskopoulou left her conservative native country to study in Paris in the 1960s, returning to Athens in the 1970s where she developed her mature style. This largely focused on heavily stylised portraits of women that satirised traditional female depiction and roles in society. Review by William Summerfield

Further reading +

Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Patrick Goddard: Trip to Eclipse

Patrick Goddard, Trip To Eclipse (2020), installation shot.

‘Trip To Eclipse’ is a new installation by Patrick Goddard, exhibited at Matt’s Gallery following his participation in the Blackrock Residency in 2016, a collaboration between the gallery and the Lydney Park Estate. The title is a reference to a 1990s clothing label, which was more popular amongst children and teens than the actual rave culture it proposed to represent. Think: bomber jackets and ultra-baggy jeans, graffiti and spliffs. Review by Chris Hayes

Further reading +