Viewing articles tagged with 'Sound'

Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Libita Clayton: Quantum Ghost

Libita Clayton, Quantum Ghost, 2019. Installation view.

For Libita Clayton’s first UK solo show the artist presents ‘Quantum Ghost’, an interlinked two-part encounter with the politics inherent to her familial heritage and the journey it took to give agency to its legacy. Review by Sophie Risner

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Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

Raqs Media Collective, Not Yet At Ease, 2018. Modular padded structure with fabric ceiling, padded stools. Six videos displayed on four monitors and two projections, six channel audio. Dimensions variable.

‘Spinal’, Raqs Media Collective's exhibition at Frith Street Gallery, features the installation ‘Not Yet At Ease’. It reflects on the mental state created by the discomfort and exploitation of First World War soldiers of Asian heritage. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Emmie McLuskey: these were the things that made the step familiar

these were the things that made the step familiar, Collective, 2019

The eight large scale screen print collages, audio works, printed matter and gymnastic ‘furniture' that make up Glasgow-based artist Emmie McLuskey's installation at Collective look at the shared poetics of the filmmaker and choreographer by analysing, describing and recording the body, through its interactions and its gestures, between rest and motion. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London SE5 7RW

Evy Jokhova: Weighed down by stones

Totem XII, 2018, MDF, paint, castor wheels, Perspex, acoustic felt, stone collection, motion sensors, computer, headphones, 60 x 60 x 152 cm (detail)

At Lily Brooke, Evy Jokhova’s latest installation ‘Weighed down by stones’ is archaeological, concerning the weight of the past upon the present and the possibility of returning to it. Review by Jacob Charles Wilson

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Plymouth, UK

The Atlantic Project: After the Future

Echoic Candy (4-Bar)

Over the course of three weeks, a variety of unusual sites throughout Plymouth have been transformed into exhibition spaces, from pedestrianised streets and dilapidated buildings to shop-front windows, as part of The Atlantic Project: After The Future, a pilot biennial for the South West region. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Paul Maheke: A fire circle for a public hearing

Paul Maheke, A place you only go through (2018). Produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery and Vleeshal Center for Contemporary Art, Middelburg

When A Fire Circle For A Public Hearing opened at Chisenhale Gallery last April, it was quite frustrating to learn that Paul Maheke was not going to perform live for the whole duration of the exhibition. Despite being completely absent from the stage, Maheke’s body is still present through a video work that plays on a continuous loop. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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The Bluecoat, School Ln, Liverpool L1 3BX

Emma Smith: Euphonia

Emma Smith: Euphonia installation view

Gradually, our eyes make way for our ears: we attune ourselves to an aural experience rather than the anticipated visual encounter. Harmonies and melodic rhythms all glide – and bounce – their way across the installation. Review by Selina Oakes

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5 - 9 Temple Bar, Dublin 2, Ireland

Katrina Palmer: The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier

Katrina Palmer, The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier, 2018, Installation view, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Her two-tone and inverted printing, combined with these notations, help turn the map into a celestial chart for navigating the tale. Along with this map, Palmer presents a pair of audio recordings, featuring a ‘silent’ reading room within the gallery, circus tunes, sampled music, as well as a dual voice recording. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Museo Rufino Tamayo, Paseo de la Reforma 51, Bosque de Chapultepec, Bosque de Chapultepec I Secc, 11580 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans, Museo Tamayo, installation view, 2018

The achievement of Wyn Evan’s show at the Museo Tamayo is to take an architectural space; equal parts gallery and auditorium, and to bring these identities together. On one side is the visual allure of the neon, a medium which seems to endlessly delight, on the other, is the music of nature and humanity; a concert exists between them. Review by Elliott Burns

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Margaret Salmon: Circle

Installation view, Margaret Salmon: Circle, Tramway, Glasgow, 2018

American Glasgow-based artist Margaret Salmon’s filmic, atmospheric and carefully rendered installation, sensitive to the nuances of people, the subtleties of places and objects (and her relationships to them) is housed in Tramway’s immense principal space. It renders the space quieter than normal, in half-light – a place for a rare, esoteric experience. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Lydia Ourahmane: The you in us

Lydia Ourahmane, In the Absence of our Mothers (2018). Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

A golden tooth is unassumingly mounted on a pin, sticking out of the wall. A cabinet with documents is standing next to it. In the middle hangs an x-ray. It takes another moment to realise a low humming is coming from the floorboards. It finds resonance with the room, with the bodies in it, and creates a feeling of being ‘within’ something latently present. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Hestercombe Gallery, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton, Somerset TA2 8LG

Odyssean: Topographies

Natasha Rosling and Vilma Luostarinen, Edible Coastlines, 2018.

Beginning high up in the Orkney Isles and journeying to the South West of England, ‘Odyssean: Topographies’ is a cognitive, visual and, at times, physical expedition into hidden and imagined spaces. The culmination of four artists' Orkney-based residencies, the exhibition throws into question the ways in which humans formulate perceptions of nature and place in an era rife with technology. Review by Selina Oakes

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Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice installation view

Susan Philipsz’s work has often been described as a form of ‘sound sculpture’ that you hear long before you see it. The exact significance behind A Single Voice is not perfectly clear. Philipsz has pointed out that the apocalyptic story of Aniara holds just as much relevance today as when the poem was first written in 1956 (arguably more), and the mournful quality of the deconstructed violin combined with the player’s stark isolation as she accompanies an invisible, inaudible orchestra through her headphones, could almost be read as a last chilling goodbye to the human race as it peters into extinction. Review by Sara Jaspan

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National Galleries of Scotland, 73 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DS

NOW | Susan Philipsz, Michael Armitage, Yto Barrada, Kate Davis, Hiwa K, Sarah Rose

Seven Tears, 2016

NOW is the second in a six-part series of exhibitions presented by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art exploring the work of international contemporary artists. It is dominated by a 5 room display of works by the artist Susan Philipsz alongside works by renowned artists Kate Davis, Sarah Rose, Hiwa K, Michael Armitage and Yto Barrada. Review by Rosie Priest

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