Viewing articles tagged with 'Sound'

Kunsthalle Wien, Museumsplatz 1 1070 Vienna

Florian Hecker: Hallucination, Perspective, Synthesis

Installation view: Hallucination, Perspective, Synthesis

Florian Hecker uses synthetic sounds and the listener’s auditory process to create acoustic spaces of experience. His computer-generated compositions dramatize psychoacoustics as well as objective-physical stimuli and their individual, psychic and physical impacts.

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Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

Emotion + the Tech(no)body

Emotion + The Tech(no)body, Ulla Rauter

Hosted at the Austrian Cultural Forum, the exhibition brings together works which evoke and unveil emotions dealing with technology as a subject or a tool. The show challenges our cultural attachment to data and the relationship of our bodies to technology, offering points of view on artistic practices that on the one hand bring these notions together, and on the other convey the tension within them. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Bonner Kunstverein and Artothek, Hochstadenring 22 D-53119 Bonn Germany

The Policeman´s Beard is Half Constructed: Art in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Installation view, The Policeman's Beard is Half Constructed: Art in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, Bonner Kunstverein 2017

Titled after the first book written by a computer, The Policeman’s Beard is Half Constructed surveys art engaged with the age of artificial intelligence. The exhibition includes both historical and contemporary artworks made between 1961 and 2017. Comprising over 100 works by 36 artists from 14 countries, the exhibition is the largest to be held at the Kunstverein in 30 years.

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Catharine Clark Gallery, 248 Utah Street, San Francisco, CA, 94103

Chris Doyle: Hollow and Swell

Hollow and Swell, Installation view

Hollow and Swell, an exhibition of new animations and watercolors by Chris Doyle. The works mark the conclusion of Doyle's extended response to Hudson River School painter Thomas Cole's iconic five part series, The Course of Empire (1833 - 1836), which depicts a single landscape as it transitions from a pastoral setting to a dense metropolis that finally, through conflict and overpopulation, deteriorates to a site of overgrown ruins. Doyle's work considers the impacts of digital technology on a rapidly proliferating cultural landscape.

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Various locations, Coventry

Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art

Bermuda Collective, Alcoholism '65

The walk from the station establishes the context for this first biennial: hoardings and lightboxes promote Coventry’s bid to be the UK’s City of Culture in 2021. In parallel the council has promised ten years of support for cultural growth regardless of the bid’s outcome. For artists and curators in the city, here was an opportunity, not just to take stock of what has recently been achieved, the partnerships already instigated, but to begin plotting the parts they will play in the years to come. Review by Kit Webb

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Isabella Bortolozzi Galerie, Schöneberger Ufer 61 10785 Berlin, Germany

James Richards: Mouth Room / Crumb Mahogany

James Richards, Mouth Room, 2017, courtesy the artist and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin

There are no images or videos to look at – only the nakedness of the sounds flooding the floor. Vibrations seemingly emerge from nowhere, as suspended spirits floating then dissipating in the air like icy breath. Review by Giulia Ponzano

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Kurimanzutto, San Miguel Chapultepec, 11850 Ciudad de México

Anri Sala: All of a Tremble

Installation view of All of a Tremble

Kurimanzutto's second exhibition of Anri Sala, where the artist explores the relationship between image construction and the physicality of sound. The exhibition illustrates how sound becomes a means to investigate the relationship between form and formation, process and production, being and becoming.

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Folkestone Triennial, various locations

Folkestone Triennial

Bob and Roberta Smith, FOLKESTONE IS AN ART SCHOOL.

Folkestone Triennial is a story within a story. It beckons the visitor to open the book of Folkestone with its historical tales of Roman Villas, bustling ports, French connections and abandoned trade routes. Beyond chapters of the past, it's also a place actively grappling with its identity and future. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 25 Arthur St, Edinburgh, EH6 5DA

You hardboiled     I softboiled

Installation view, You hardboiled I softboiled, Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 2017 (Valerie Norris, Music for Intelligent Young Ladies (2013), and, bedroom furniture (2013)).

In this intriguingly titled and intimately composed exhibition, ideas of how love and its stories might be practiced, sought and appropriated move between the published page and spoken word, and are heard through sound and audio. Love is also framed within filmed moments and presented in painted gestures; it is seen in close proximity and recognised across vast distances. The love stories described here are sensed in places, portraits, correspondences and spectres. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Athens, Greece

Documenta 14: Athens

Rebecca Belmore, Biinjiya'iing Onji (From inside), 2017, marble, Filopappou Hill, Athens, documenta 14

Documenta 14: 'Learning from Athens' promised to address some of the current social and political issues facing Europe today by questioning its foundations: colonialism, patriarchy, gender-normativity and capitalism. Yet many feared that the exhibition tried to glamorise the ‘Greek crisis’ and capitalise on what is a very complex and difficult social and economic situation. What’s in it for Athens? Review by Anaïs Castro

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Cubitt Gallery, 8 Angel Mews, Islington, London N1 9HH

Houses are really bodies: escape, defiance and friendship in the writing of Leonora Carrington

Houses are really bodies: the writing of Leonora Carrington, installation view, Cubitt Gallery, London, 2017.

In the contemporary, the idea of ‘sanctuary’ is an interesting one. Helen Nisbet’s use of the word when describing ‘Houses are really bodies’, her debut installation as Cubitt’s latest Curatorial Fellow, strikes chords that place the show both within a dense history and at the forefront of the present. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham, B1 2HS

Oliver Beer

Oliver Beer, installation view at Ikon, 2017

Beer’s practice is diverse – encompassing film, sound, and sculpture – and perhaps more easily related by sensibility than subject matter. His home video, ‘Mum’s Continuous Note’, which welcomes us into the exhibition, serves as our induction. Review by Kit Webb

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Kunstmuseum Bonn, Friedrich-Ebert-Allee 2, 53113 Bonn, Germany

Lundahl & Seitl: New Originals

Lundahl & Seitl: New Originals, 2017, installation view at Kunstmuseum Bonn

‘New Originals’ from Lundahl & Seitl was developed expressly for the Kunstmuseum Bonn and marks a new phase in the way the artists work. For the first time, an audio-performative work by Lundahl & Seidl is taking place as an independent exhibition over a three month stretch of time. Text by Sally Müller

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Decad, Gneisenaustraße 52, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Christopher Petit: In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone

Christopher Petit: In What's Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone, installation view at Decad, 201

Novelist and filmmaker Christopher Petit presents ‘In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone’. Using a pixelated image of the late David Bowie as a stimulus, the four works presented are an examination of a quiet voyeurism that speaks to internal, often inexpressible observations surrounding popular, repetitive images. Review by Candice Nembhard

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