Viewing articles tagged with 'Text'

Plymouth Arts Centre, Peninsula Arts, KARST, Plymouth College of Art, The Council House, Plymouth

We The People Are The Work

More Than A Pony Show, Matt Stokes.

A partnership between Plymouth’s major visual arts venues, 'We The People Are The Work' is comprised of five new commissions installed across the city. With each involving varying degrees of collaboration with the city’s inhabitants, at the core of the work is how each artist navigates the complexities of ‘social engagement’. Review by Rowan Lear

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Various locations, Coventry

Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art

Bermuda Collective, Alcoholism '65

The walk from the station establishes the context for this first biennial: hoardings and lightboxes promote Coventry’s bid to be the UK’s City of Culture in 2021. In parallel the council has promised ten years of support for cultural growth regardless of the bid’s outcome. For artists and curators in the city, here was an opportunity, not just to take stock of what has recently been achieved, the partnerships already instigated, but to begin plotting the parts they will play in the years to come. Review by Kit Webb

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Project Narrative Informant, Morley House, 26 Holborn Viaduct, The City of London, London EC1A 2AQ

Juliana Huxtable

Installation view, Project Narrative Informant

In her first UK solo show, Huxtable's focus shifts to what covers the bodies of others. The exhibition is centered around ten panels of text displaying fragments from a larger narrative written by Huxtable. Threaded through the story of a young blonde who falls in with a crowd of skinheads in London, is an analysis of struggles over the meaning of the white skinhead aesthetic: bomber jackets, Fred Perry, Ben Sherman. Review by Kevin Brazil

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Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 25 Arthur St, Edinburgh, EH6 5DA

You hardboiled     I softboiled

Installation view, You hardboiled I softboiled, Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 2017 (Valerie Norris, Music for Intelligent Young Ladies (2013), and, bedroom furniture (2013)).

In this intriguingly titled and intimately composed exhibition, ideas of how love and its stories might be practiced, sought and appropriated move between the published page and spoken word, and are heard through sound and audio. Love is also framed within filmed moments and presented in painted gestures; it is seen in close proximity and recognised across vast distances. The love stories described here are sensed in places, portraits, correspondences and spectres. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Cubitt Gallery, 8 Angel Mews, Islington, London N1 9HH

Houses are really bodies: escape, defiance and friendship in the writing of Leonora Carrington

Houses are really bodies: the writing of Leonora Carrington, installation view, Cubitt Gallery, London, 2017.

In the contemporary, the idea of ‘sanctuary’ is an interesting one. Helen Nisbet’s use of the word when describing ‘Houses are really bodies’, her debut installation as Cubitt’s latest Curatorial Fellow, strikes chords that place the show both within a dense history and at the forefront of the present. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Furtherfield Gallery, The McKenzie Pavilion, Harringay, London N4 2NQ

PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.

Refugee Flag, Installation view at Furtherfield Gallery, 2017

‘PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.’ announces itself with a song and a flag. Yara Said’s ‘Refugee Nation’ flag, designed in lifejacket orange for stateless participants of the 2016 Olympics, floats over the small pavilion in Finsbury Park housing Furtherfield Gallery. Review by David Morris

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Decad, Gneisenaustraße 52, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Christopher Petit: In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone

Christopher Petit: In What's Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone, installation view at Decad, 201

Novelist and filmmaker Christopher Petit presents ‘In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone’. Using a pixelated image of the late David Bowie as a stimulus, the four works presented are an examination of a quiet voyeurism that speaks to internal, often inexpressible observations surrounding popular, repetitive images. Review by Candice Nembhard

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Lodos, Edificio Humboldt, 116 Calle del Artículo 123, Int. 301, Colonia Centro, Mexico City, Mexico

Kasia Fudakowski: Bad Basket

Kasia Fudakowski: Bad Basket, installation view at Lodos, 2017

‘Everything that is not a basket, is a bad basket’ exclaims Kasia Fudakowski in her solo show at Lodos Gallery in Mexico City. Craft, and its valuation, is at the centre of this show, as Berlin-based Fudakowski archly comments on appropriation, market value and the definition of artistic labour. Review by Henry Osman

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Ghislaine Leung: The Moves

Pictures, 2017, Ghislaine Leung. Raised floor with sunken recess, black rubber Push to Shove, 2017, Ghislaine Leung. Foam board, tape, carpet, rubber, phones, night lights, video, photos, paper, acetate, mirror, extension cables, cable ties. 61 x 112

The display overwhelms by its absence of images and presents instead a series of glass wall panels bracketed inside aluminium structures. These panels, covered with black vinyl texts, spell out incidental conversations, unsolicited quotes, traces of speech. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, Moss Street, Bury, BL9 0DR, UK

Reading As Art

Reading As Art, installation view

Simon Morris examines the relationship between reading and art .

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Breese Little, Unit 1, 249 - 253 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 6JY

The Science of Imaginary Solutions

Installation view

The object is front and centre of what is an incredibly wide ranging exhibition that spans millennia. In Breese Little's new space in Bethnal Green, a series of works and subtle juxtapositions probe the ways in which object-led narratives are eminently malleable, prone to changing tides in both scientific and philosophical thinking. Will Gresson reviews

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