Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Andreas Gursky

Installation image, Andreas Gursky at Hayward Gallery 25 January - 22 April 2018

Gursky captures the next step in the evolution of our sense of resolution, a way of seeing beyond increasing levels of detail, one which constantly flips back and fourth between the detail and the overview, perhaps imprinted in us as we zoom in and zoom out when using Google maps – in fractions of a second we can travel from our own home to the scale of the whole world and back again. Review by Matthew Turner

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NS

Women Look at Women

Installation view, Women Look At Women, Richard Saltoun Gallery, London 15 February - 31 March 2018

The show opens with Renate Bertlmann’s ‘Transformations’ (1969/2013), a series of 53 black and white photographs which address an analysis of gender-specific social roles through the role-play sequence of staged photography. Indeed, the importance of inventing alter-egos in performance seems significant throughout the exhibition. Review by Matthew Cheale

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage

Photo caption - Installation view, 2018 Triennial: “Songs for Sabotage”

While each painting on view in the 2018 Triennial: Songs For Sabotage, at the New Museum, New York, might pack a punch on its own, when grouped, this pervasive, globalized homogeneity only undercuts the swollen pomp ascribed to Songs of Sabotage by its organizers, and points, perhaps, to a more sinister condescension afoot in the galleries themselves. Review by Torey Akers

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Museo Rufino Tamayo, Paseo de la Reforma 51, Bosque de Chapultepec, Bosque de Chapultepec I Secc, 11580 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans, Museo Tamayo, installation view, 2018

The achievement of Wyn Evan’s show at the Museo Tamayo is to take an architectural space; equal parts gallery and auditorium, and to bring these identities together. On one side is the visual allure of the neon, a medium which seems to endlessly delight, on the other, is the music of nature and humanity; a concert exists between them. Review by Elliott Burns

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Oriel Davies Gallery, The Park, Newtown, SY16 2NZ

Freya Dooley: Speakable Things

Freya Dooley, Speakable Things, Oriel Davies, 2018

‘Speakable Things’, Freya Dooley’s newly commissioned sound and moving image work for Litmus at Oriel Davies, is installed within a room painted a deep pink comparable to the inside of a mouth. It is an intimate colour for an intimate space, measuring less than 2m². The mouth repeatedly appears throughout ‘Speakable Things’, as blank space interrupts out-of-sync close ups and scenes of wild landscape. Freya is interested in the voice as something in-between inside and outside, sound and language, thought and body. Text by Litmus Curator Louise Hobson

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming

Installation view of Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming, Camden Arts Centre, 2018.

Rhythm defines Giorgio Griffa’s work. Throughout the Camden Arts Centre’s gallery spaces, from his earliest, late 1960s work to his more recent output, his bright, repeated gestures mark the raw canvases in sequences and patterns. The rhythmic quality is emphasised by the folds of his unstretched canvases, starkly visible, which segment the surfaces of the paintings into something like a score. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Hauser & Wirth Zürich, Limmatstrasse 270, 8005 Zürich

Larry Bell Venice Fog: Recent Investigations

Installation view, 'Larry Bell. Venice Fog: Recent Investigations', Hauser & Wirth Zurich, 2018

A fixation with glass structures and their interactions with light have dominated Larry Bell’s practice throughout his career. In his latest exhibition, Venice Fog: Recent Investigations, at Hauser & Wirth, Zürich, Bell continues his fascination with this material, drawing inspiration from the atmospheric fog of Californian mornings. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

No, No, No, No

No, No, No, No Installation View, 2018

Through the use of verbal and visual puns, the works displayed in ‘No, No, No, No’ convey irony and humour, and challenge the audience by playing with ideas of authorship, making and presenting art, and even appropriating existing artworks. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Margaret Salmon: Circle

Installation view, Margaret Salmon: Circle, Tramway, Glasgow, 2018

American Glasgow-based artist Margaret Salmon’s filmic, atmospheric and carefully rendered installation, sensitive to the nuances of people, the subtleties of places and objects (and her relationships to them) is housed in Tramway’s immense principal space. It renders the space quieter than normal, in half-light – a place for a rare, esoteric experience. Review by Alex Hetherington

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LADA

LADA Screens - Martin O’Brien

The Unwell, by Martin O’Brien and Suhail Ilyas, takes us into an apocalyptic landscape inhabited only by strange, coughing bodies, and is part of Martin’s ongoing exploration of the figure of the zombie as a metaphor for the sick body.

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Public spaces around Europe and Iran – Darbast Platform

Tara Fatehi Irani: Mishandled Archive

Mishandled Archive, Tara Fatehi Irani, Tehran (2018)

What we see and hear in ‘Mishandled Archive’ is not limited to one narrator – several voices are heard. It is as if we are wandering in the aural and visual space of a polyphonic text that relieves the many voices of its characters from a singular dominant authority. Review by Helia Hamedani

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