Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

The Fruitmarket Gallery, 45 Market St, Edinburgh EH1 1DF

Jac Leirner: Add It Up

Jac Leirner, Add It Up, installation view The Fruitmarket Gallery 2017.

Leirner’s works frequently organise and repurpose slight ephemera into a surprising coalescence. Whilst the career-wide spectrum of activity on display successfully demonstrates the consistent concerns within her oeuvre, the volume of works within this cross-section seems at odds with their essential simplicity, which at times is perhaps diluted in the two satiated galleries. Review by Nathan Anthony

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The Koppel Project Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

The Hive Mind

The Hive Mind installation downstairs

‘The Hive Mind’ is a group exhibition consisting of sculpture, painting, video and print work by new and established artists, that probes the question of connectivity in an increasingly dysfunctional and meaningless reality. Review by Evie Ward

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Thomas Dane Gallery 3 Duke Street St James's London SW1Y 6BN

Naming Rights

Naming Rights at Thomas Dane Gallery 2017, Installation View

‘Naming Rights’ is a unique exhibition that discloses the arcane mechanisms of an artist run project space, converting the gallery into a place for artistic research and experimentation. The result is a distinctive presentation of works by international artists. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Dreamers Awake

Dreamers Awake, Installation view, 27 June - 17 September 2017

The bodies without eyes, without hands, fragmented and uncanny, as portrayed by the multiple generations of female artists presented in ‘Dreamers Awake’ hijack Surrealist tropes and techniques, and both reproduce and resist the voyeuristic gaze. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Bermondsey Square, London

Lucy Tomlins: Pylon and Pier

Lucy Tomlins, Pylon and Pier, 2017. SCULPTURE AT Bermondsey Square.

In between the glass-fronted perimeters of Bermondsey Square, on the tiled ground, stands an empty plinth. This robust hexagon, coated a light beige to match the innocuous colour scheme of the commercial properties, could well be a part of the developer’s vision. It is sympathetic to the clusters of metal octadecahedron inevitably installed to add interest and dynamism to an otherwise anaesthetised square. Cleo Roberts reviews.

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Kavi Gupta, 835 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago, IL 60607

Glenn Kaino: Sign

 Installation view of Sign, 2017

In his upcoming exhibition, Sign, at Kavi Gupta, Chicago, Glenn Kaino directly challenges the signifiers of colonial action: objects which encode the terms of traversal, demarcate ownership, and crystallize territory into the social contract. Maps, flags, signs, and peace agreements all have one thing in common, they are symbolic markers of man’s assertion of his ownership of his world.

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Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London, SE5 7RW

Eva Gold: A Bead of Sweat, Stilled

Drawing on a broad framework of cinematic references, for her upcoming exhibition at Lily Brooke, Eva Gold presents an installation comprising several individual sculptures. Situated within a broader exploration of filmic spaces, Gold here extends her analysis of the cinematic landscape as memory site.

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ

Yuri Pattison: user, space

Yuri Pattison, user, space (2016). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2016. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Courtesy of the artist; mother's tankstation limited, Dublin; Helga Maria Klosterfelde, Berlin; and Labor, Mexico.

A long table surrounded by Ikea-style chairs runs through the centre of the gallery, while in one corner, a separate environment for relaxing houses oversized cushions and shelves of plants. And everywhere, there is the physical manifestation of tech: wires, adapters, servers, computers, and cameras, creating a cacophony of noise that hums throughout the installation. Review by William Rees

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Barbican, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop

 Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop 9 October 2015 - 10 January 2016

The spine of the exhibition is ‘Revolution’ - a 30-minute video displayed on five monitors throughout the gallery and accompanied by a live choreographed performance. This mash up of dancers in a studio performing strong, synchronised choreography, Kool FM DJs jamming to Drum & Bass and Peake family home videos dictates the throbbing, erratic rhythm that permeates the space. Review by Alex Borkowski

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Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Artist Interview: Brian Griffiths

Brian Griffiths, BILL MURRAY: a story of distance, size and sincerity, 2015

Luke Naessens interviews Brian Griffiths about his exhibition 'BILL MURRAY: a story of distance, size, and sincerity' at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art.

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 24 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Sunset Décor - Curated by Magalí Arriola

Sunset Décor 2017 Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Installation view

At a time when populations, cultures and the environment are fighting to resist conservative thinking and political assault, Sunset Décor puts into perspective the instrumentalization, now as then, of nature, the individual and the land for the production of a symbolic order in the name of freedom, civilization and democracy.

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Michael Dean: Sic Glyphs

Michael Dean, Sic Glyphs, installation view at the South London Gallery, 2016

Whether affixed to other structures or lolling on the floor, Dean's oversized, weighty and flaccid things convey the muscular effort of communication, pushing forward an idea of language as material process and bodily struggle. They return, heaped on the floor, in ‘Sic Glyphs’, an exhibition of new work by Dean currently on display in the South London Gallery, an exhibition for which the artist has been nominated for the Turner Prize. Luke Naessens reviews

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