Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Patrick Goddard: Trip to Eclipse

Patrick Goddard, Trip To Eclipse (2020), installation shot.

‘Trip To Eclipse’ is a new installation by Patrick Goddard, exhibited at Matt’s Gallery following his participation in the Blackrock Residency in 2016, a collaboration between the gallery and the Lydney Park Estate. The title is a reference to a 1990s clothing label, which was more popular amongst children and teens than the actual rave culture it proposed to represent. Think: bomber jackets and ultra-baggy jeans, graffiti and spliffs. Review by Chris Hayes

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Lauren Gault: C I T H R A

Lauren Gault, C I T H R A, 2020. Installation view. Commissioned by Gasworks.

Lauren Gault’s exhibition ‘C I T H R A’ at Gasworks, London, is a show of strange encounters. The installation continues the artist’s interest in the possibilities of materials, using ‘sculptural language as a connective tissue’ for her wider research. Review by Tess Charnley

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Blvd, Nottingham NG7 6BE

Shezad Dawood: Encroachments

Shezad Dawood, Encroachments. Installation view, New Art Exchange, 2020

Shezad Dawood’s exhibition is overrun with multi-coloured terrazzo. The walls are plastered with garish speckles, which seep into paintings, prints, plinths and even the exhibition guide. The terrazzo, designed by Dawood, gives the display a Pop-y veneer, strengthened by visual allusions to Robert Rauschenberg’s collages and Andy Warhol’s silkscreens, as well as tributes to the arcade game, Space Invaders. Review by Julia Schouten

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Jerwood Arts,171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/Photoworks Awards

Silvia Rosi, Jerwood/Photoworks Awards 2020 supported by Jerwood Arts and Photoworks. Installation view at Jerwood Space, London.

The Jerwood/Photoworks Awards is a significant opportunity for an early career artist to develop their work over the course of a year with the benefit of financial support and a program of mentoring. The 2020 winners are Silvia Rosi and Theo Simpson and their commissioned work is currently on view at Jerwood Arts. The award boasts its effort to encourage artists who engage with photography in an experimental way. Review by Katie McCain

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SPACE Ilford, 10 Oakfield Road, Ilford, IG1 1ZJ

Lindsey Mendick: Regrets, I’ve Had a Few

Lindsey Mendick: Regrets, I've Had A Few, 2019. Mixed media installation including: ceramics, paint and fabric.

Many of the works comprising Lindsey Mendick’s exhibition are the culmination of a series of ceramic workshops she led for Ilford-based over 65 year-olds, including over 70 ceramic sculptures – ranging from Dorothy Gale-style red stilettos and a bird bath, elaborately decorated vases and colourful crockery, fabric clad angel figurines and anthropomorphic animals at sail in a fictional sea – together with painted wall murals, fabric banners, and sculptural display structures. The show marks the grand opening of the new SPACE Studios in Ilford situated in the rear of the Town Hall. Review by Tyler Woolcott

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Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin

Derek Jarman: PROTEST!

The Garden

The vast scale of work on show is what grips you first when entering ‘PROTEST!’, the Derek Jarman retrospective at Dublin’s Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA). It spans the entirety of IMMA’s West Wing, comprising 11 rooms, a number of alcoves and two long, connecting corridors. The show displays works from the four decades of Jarman’s career, beginning in the late-50s, as he entered King’s College London, through to the ‘90s and his untimely death in 1994 from an AIDS-related illness aged just 52. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Kohta, Teurastamo, Työpajankatu 2, 00580 Helsinki, Finland

Lili Dujourie

Ballade - Althea

Lili Dujourie’s exhibition at Kohta briefly touches on three different decades of the Belgian artist’s career. Given the works generally subdued character and their limited number, they are remarkably cogent and confirm Dujourie’s intellectual restlessness. The selection here draws attention to Dujourie’s resolve to experiment and keep experimenting with different media and intellectual approaches. At Kohta, the proof of this encompasses a sculptural installation, a black and white video and a group of small paper-based sculptures. Review by John Gayer

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Various locations, Singapore

Singapore Bienniale

Dennis Tan, Many Waters to Cross, 2019.

The beautiful vistas of rivers conjure a fantasy of a communal globalised world. As we watch the swirling river waters, the narration recalls that the Mekong became a dividing line of partition, as family members risked their lives to cross the river to escape to Thailand from the communist regime change of 1975. Piers Masterson reviews the Singapore Biennale, reflecting on highlights from this large, multi-sited and politically charged display.

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Galeria Le Guern, Katowicka 25, 03-932 Warszawa, Poland

Alicja Gaskon: Dividing Lines

Dividing Lines, installation

Inspired by her recent trip to the North Korean border, Warsaw-based artist Alicja Gaskon presents ‘Dividing Lines’: a physical and conceptual representation of the most prominent boundaries through history. From North Korea to the Berlin Wall, and more recently, Trump’s wall, Gaskon’s inquiry accentuates the absence of ethical consideration within the rationale of national preservation. Review by Elaine Y.J Zheng

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Museum of Cycladic Art, Neofitou Douka 4, Athens 106 74, Greece

Lynda Benglis: In the Realm of the Senses, Presented by NEON

Lynda Benglis: In the Realm of the Senses, Installation view copyright Panos Kokkinias Courtesy NEON

I’ve never seen Lynda Benglis’s work look more relevant than scattered around an opulent Neo-Classical mansion in the shadow of the Acropolis. The Stathatos Mansion is a slave to taste and style, determinedly emulating the great villas of the past, and Benglis’s sculpture is its total opposite. It’s bold, it’s bombastic, even vulgar at times, and unlike Neo-Classicism, never conventional, not even for a second. Review by William Summerfield

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FACT, 88 Wood St, Liverpool, L1 4DQ

you feel me_

Why Can't We Do This IRL_, installation view at FACT

‘you feel me_’ opened on 31st October 2019―a fitting day on which to interrogate all things systemic and speculative. For one thing it was Halloween, and for another, it was the day on which the UK had been billed to leave the European Union. The press material for FACT’s new group show knowingly invites its viewers to “feel the future and imagine a world without division”, and interrogate power structures both literal and more abstract. Review by Lucy Holt

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180 The Strand, London, WC2R 1EA

Transformer: A Rebirth of Wonder

Korakrit Arunanondchai, Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3, 2015

The space below 180 The Strand feels labyrinthine and immersive – shuffling through the exhibition, there is no real sense of where anything is in relation to anything else. The works occur sequentially, with no overlap between worlds and no deviation from this path. A varied approach to texture, sound, and scent add to the feeling of discrete worlds, as does the lighting, with rooms ranging from almost totally dark or U.V. for Chen’s photographs to the stark, blindingly white light as in Huanca’s installation, or the blue neon strip lighting that extends from the virtual reality of the screen into the space itself in Lek’s work. Review by Katie McCain

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Touchstones, The Esplanade, Rochdale OL16 1AQ

Jamie Fitzpatrick: He He He He

Jamie Fitzpatrick, He He He He, 2019. Installation view. Contemporary Forward at Touchstones Rochdale.

Split between two rooms, ‘He He He He’ presents 4 male protagonists loosely based on canonical figures such as Elvis Presley, the art-world all-star Henry Moore dressed as a cowboy and an amalgamation of Charles I and Vincent Price as Matthew Hopkins: Witchfinder General. Each character has aptly named one word titles relating to the figures they are based around, highlighting their fairly literal qualities and reason for being selected. Review by William Noel Clarke

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Gagosian, 20 Grosvenor Hill, London W1K 3QD

Cy Twombly: Sculpture

Cy Twombly, Untitled (St. Sebastian), bronze, 1998

Cy Twombly’s sculptures are mostly created from materials such as wood, plaster, iron and other objects that might be found in an artist’s studio. Every piece is individually assembled displaying a sense of historic meaning. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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