Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Auguststraße 69, 10117 Berlin, Germany

Schering Stiftung Art Award 2018: Anna Daučíková

Upbringing by Touch

The current exhibition at KW Institute presents the work of Anna Daučíková through video, photography and sculpture. Spanning the past five decades, the body of work refuses linearity, welcomes the experimental possibilities between the artist and her materials, and opens up to wider discourses on identity. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Makers Open

Mark Corfield-Moore, Celestial Meteors, 2019 (left); Nitrous Flame, 2019 (middle) and Golden Showers, 2019 (right). Dyed Warp, handwoven cotton in oak frame.

The work in this year’s Jerwood Makers Open is undoubtedly beautiful and desirable. But it also resists quick consumption. Investigations into traditional craft processes, social anxieties and climate change all appear in this meditation on making. Review by Bernard Hay

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Magasin III Jaffa, 6813131 34, Olei Zion St, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel

Cosima von Bonin: Ocean and Caffeine

Seasons in the Abyss

Two fish dressed up in skirts and shackled to guitars guard the entrance of Magasin III in Jaffa at Cosima von Bonin’s first solo exhibition in Israel. ‘Ocean and Caffeine’ looks as if it is inspired by the essence of the port city as a surfboard leans horizontally on the wall, but it is a crash course in nearly two decades of von Bonin’s work about marine life. Review by Danielle Gorodenzik

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Museum Voorlinden, Buurtweg 90, 2244 AG Wassenaar, Netherlands

Do Ho Suh

Staircase - III

Do Ho Suh’s solo exhibition highlights the artist’s fabric replicas of the places where he once lived. Reproduced at a 1:1 scale and in a range of colours, this well-known mode of his practice not only charts the route Suh’s life has taken, but also creates a presence that is more atmospheric than architectural. Based on residences in Berlin, London, Seoul, and New York City, these markers speak of the evanescence of past experiences and the frailty of memory. Their cumulative effect balances the mnemonic with fact. Review by John Gayer

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Sprüth Magers, 7A Grafton Street, London W1S 4EJ

Senga Nengudi

Installation view, Senga Nengudi, Sprüth Magers, London, 7 June - 13 July 2019

Nengudi utilises nylon stockings in various shades of brown; stretching them tight, filling the gusset with sand, or allowing them to flap around in front of an air conditioning vent. The ‘R.S.V.P.’ sculptures are powerfully evocative, alluding to the female body and to the racialised body, even while they explore a formal approach to the industrial, the quotidian and the found object. The exhibition also hints at – but perhaps doesn’t make quite enough of – Nengudi’s performance practice, through which she ‘activates’ her stocking-sculptures through dance, adding yet another layer to the ways in which these pieces can be experienced. Review by Anna Souter

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Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Rd, Bermondsey, London SE16 4DF

Dean Kenning: Psychobotanical

Dean Kenning, Psychobotanical, 2019, installation view

The centrepiece of Dean Kenning’s new show ‘Psychobotanical’ is ‘Untitled (Rubber Plant)’, a kinetic sculpture made of silicon. On a waist-high plinth, two perfectly white, tendrilled sculptures are motorised to interact with each other in a way which seems both random and imbued with human gesture – somewhere between the wavy wind-sock creatures you see outside MOT garages and a gallery-friendly ‘Day Of The Triffids’. Review by Lucy Holt

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Delfina Foundation, 29/31 Catherine Place, London SW1E 6DY

Asunción Molinos Gordo: Accumulation by Dispossession

Asunción Molinos Gordo, Accumulation by Dispossession, 2019. Exhibition at Delfina Foundation

As a part of the current programme at Delfina Foundation, ‘The Politics of Food’, the artist Asunción Molinos Gordo draws on ideas and techniques responding to the destructive system of food production and its ambivalent, two-faced character. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, 3 Chome-20-2 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku City, Tokyo 163-1403, Japan

Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony

Tom Sachs "Tea Ceremony" installation view

Despite the readymade being a well-established component in modern art, there are still new ways of using mass-produced objects to draw our attention to how we connect with the everyday material world. In the case of Tom Sachs, the New York City-based sculptor known for fashioning makeshift objects and installations from materials as commonplace as duct tape and electrical appliances, his recent exhibition at Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery focuses on the use of objects as part of rituals, specifically, as the title makes plain, the Japanese tea ceremony. Review by Nick West

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Castor, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Alan Magee: Data Dust, Dust Data

Celestial Machines Drop ceiling, Light panel, Screen, Video, Robotic arm, Arduino, Raspberry pi and Circuitry 130 x 130 x 95cm, 2019

Upon entering ‘Data Dust, Dust Data’, Alan Magee’s second exhibition at Castor Projects, the visitor is immediately confronted by two contrasting artworks: go left towards a hanging, high-tech exhibit that includes a tangle of wires and exposed circuitry and a motionless robotic arm, or right towards a chest-height, curvilinear plinth topped with black foam and displaying a dozen small, pinkish objects. Review by Rebecca Morrill

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

staring forms: Miranda Blennerhassett, Aleana Egan, Andreas Kindler von Knobloch, Tanad Williams

staring forms, installation image, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Mid-way through ‘A Game of Chess’, the second section of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem ‘The Waste Land’, come the words that have lent themselves to the title of ‘staring forms’, a new group exhibition in Dublin’s Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. In these lines Eliot references the ancient (and violent) Greek myth of King Tereus and the sisters Philomela and Procne, all three of whom were turned into birds by the gods. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Heidi Schwegler and Quayola: Plane of Scattered Pasts

Athazagoraphobia

In ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ at Upfor Gallery in Portland, Oregon, artists Heidi Schwegler and Quayola explore object histories and the fragmentation process with sculptural works and video. Schwegler amends, recasts, and highlights aged objects to reframe their value. Quayola’s video piece ‘Strata #1’ (2008) invigorates the exhibition with immersive sound and vivid colour. While the show focuses on the fragmented form, ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ is conceptually complete. Review by Lindsay Costello

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Kettle's Yard, Castle Street, Cambridge, CB3 0AQ

Oscar Murillo: Violent Amnesia

Oscar Murillo, Violent Amnesia, 2019. Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge

“No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” Oscar Murillo’s current exhibition at Kettle’s Yard starts with these words by John Donne. This quote is a testimony of the artist’s mourning for his friend, Nigerian curator and unique contributor to the art world, Okwui Enwezor, who died earlier this year. But it makes me think that if Murillo were an island, he would have been a floating island. Review by Gulnaz Can

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