Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Affinity and Allusion

Dineo Seshee Bopape, [when spirituality was a baby], 2018, Collective City Dome

‘Affinity and Allusion’, the opening project at the new expanded Collective on Edinburgh’s Calton Hill, does not refer to a group show as such, as one might expect for the relaunch, or remaking and reimagining of an institution like this, but is rather a title of intention, focus and scope around the nature of exhibitions and displays, given to a cluster, or constellation (the theme of astronomy is in abundance here, given that the site is a former observatory), of complex activities. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, St James's, London SE14 6AD

Kris Lemsalu: 4Life

Kris Lemsalu, Holy Hell O (2018).

For her first solo exhibition in London, ‘4LIFE’, multidisciplinary artist Kris Lemsalu transforms the upstairs galleries at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art into a supernatural realm, occupied with otherworldly, absurdist characters that guide you through stages of birth, life and death. Review by Julia Schouten

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The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield WF1 5AW

The Hepworth Prize for Sculpture

Installation shot of Michael Dean in The Hepworth Prize for Sculpture. 26 October 2018 - 20 January 2019.

Now in its second edition, the biannual £30,000 Hepworth Prize for Sculpture, presents us with five artists that serve to answer the question, ‘Where is contemporary sculpture headed?’ in one absolute way: everywhere and anywhere. With nothing off limits, everything and the kitchen sink can be found in this year’s shortlisted works, even some anticlimactic human hair … Review by Kit Edwards

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Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

Newstalgia

Elisabeth Molin, Ate Chocolate, (edible monuments) 2018

‘Newstalgia’ is shifting common ways of memorialisation into question. It does this through exposing attempts to activate social and cultural habits that remember and question contemporary ways to fulfil civil duties – to re-evaluate economic, cultural and societal operations. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Vanessa Billy: Future Perfect

Vanessa Billy, Future Perfect, installation view

Post-apocalyptic in tone, this set of interconnected works further develops themes of nature and transformation, concerns at the core of Billy’s practice. Consisting of new pieces and site specific interventions, the exhibition speculates on a future where science has radical consequences on the environment and living species within it.

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Plymouth College of Art, Tavistock Pl, Plymouth PL4 8AT

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency

Simon Bayliss: Meditations in an Emergency installation view

Simon Bayliss’ exhibition, Meditations in an Emergency, is an exhibition of multitudes, crossing from pottery and electronic music to watercolour landscapes, poetry and performative film. The show by is a marriage of the seemingly incongruous, such as the neon sign alternating SIMON BAYLISS / SIN ON GAY BLISS reflecting on the glazing of his pottery. It is a joining, as the words inscribed on the pot reads, of ‘high and low with one another’. Review by Eva Szwarc

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

KNOCK KNOCK: Humour in Contemporary Art

Installation view of KNOCK KNOCK at South London Gallery (22 September - 18 November 2018) Pictured: She (2017) and KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN (2018) by Danielle Dean

Despite the show’s title, which has been taken from Roy Lichtenstein’s ‘Knock, Knock Poster’ (1976) and which appears in the main gallery, the exhibition refuses the monotony of formulaic joke-telling and instead employs irony and cynicism to create moments of discomfort and menace. Review by Olivia Aherne

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Humber Street Gallery, 64 Humber St, Hull HU1 1TU

Jamie Reid: XXXXX: Fifty Years of Subversion and the Spirit

Jamie Reid: XXXXX: Fifty Years of Subversion and the Spirit installation view

Raised as a socialist and a druid and initiated into political activism at a young age, Jamie Reid blames his parents for his rebellious streak; which at the age of 71, shows no sign of abating. The self-described anarchist uses iconoclastic collages and seditious ransom note-style idioms to marshal a cultural insurgence against the status quo; while his kaleidoscopic paintings reject materialism and individualism through a meditative connection with nature. Review by Christopher Little

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Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, Via Chiese, 2, 20126 Milano MI, Italy

Mario Merz: Igloos

Mario Merz, "Igloos", exhibition view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, 2018

Curated by Vicente Todolí, Pirelli HangarBicocca Milan is currently presenting the iconic Igloos of Mario Merz (1925–2003) - a key figure of Arte Povera, and considered to be one of the most important post-war Italian artists; the exhibition brings together his most iconic oeuvre of work, the igloos, which date from 1968 until the end of the artist’s life. Review by Paul Black

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Space Shifters

Installation view of Alicja Kwade, WeltenLinie, 2017 at Space Shifters

Featuring work from over twenty artists, this final show of the Hayward’s 50th season hopes to alter your perception of space, sometimes dramatically, sometimes subtly. But, as objects in a rear-view mirror may in fact be larger than they appear, the reflective experience can be diminutive. Absorbing, yes. Engaging, yes. But shallow. Just ask Narcissus. Review by Adam Heardman

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Hauser & Wirth Somerset, Durslade Farm, Dropping Ln, Bruton BA10 0NL

Berlinde De Bruyckere: Stages & Tales

Installation view, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Stages & Tales, Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 2018

Each is a pallet with layers of folded and stacked hide, forming their own contours and falls, where the odd pinks, yellows and blues of these objects speak of the fatty animals these hides once were, and the treated material they will become. Review by Stan Portus

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William Benington Gallery, Unit 3, 50 Tower Bridge Road, London, SE1 4TR and Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Amy Stephens: Land | Reland

Hood trail

Each work across both shows and throughout Stephens’ practice exists as part of an interlinking chain. She continually returns to and reuses ideas, allowing them to land and re-land, resisting the ossifying force of finitude and following the fluidity of nature’s endless cycles. Review by Sara Jaspan

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The British School at Athens

Andreas Lolis: Prosaic Origins

Untitled, 2018
 copyright Panos Kokkinias 
Courtesy NEON

Arriving at the British School at Athens to view the current show, Prosaic Origins, I am informed by the artist, Andreas Lolis, that I have walked past and missed, not one, but two pieces in his new exhibition

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Parasol unit, 14 Wharf Rd, Hoxton, London N1 7RW

Heidi Bucher

Heidi Bucher, installation view at Parasol unit, London, 2018.

Wood panelled rooms with French windows, parquet flooring, linen duvets and night gowns embroidered with edelweiss. What is on display at Parasol unit are not the surfaces themselves but their skins, cast in latex by the Swiss artist Heidi Bucher whose importance has been increasingly recognised since a posthumous retrospective at the Migros Museum in Zurich (2004). Review by Samuel Glanville

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