Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, 3 Chome-20-2 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku City, Tokyo 163-1403, Japan

Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony

Tom Sachs "Tea Ceremony" installation view

Despite the readymade being a well-established component in modern art, there are still new ways of using mass-produced objects to draw our attention to how we connect with the everyday material world. In the case of Tom Sachs, the New York City-based sculptor known for fashioning makeshift objects and installations from materials as commonplace as duct tape and electrical appliances, his recent exhibition at Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery focuses on the use of objects as part of rituals, specifically, as the title makes plain, the Japanese tea ceremony. Review by Nick West

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Castor, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Alan Magee: Data Dust, Dust Data

Celestial Machines Drop ceiling, Light panel, Screen, Video, Robotic arm, Arduino, Raspberry pi and Circuitry 130 x 130 x 95cm, 2019

Upon entering ‘Data Dust, Dust Data’, Alan Magee’s second exhibition at Castor Projects, the visitor is immediately confronted by two contrasting artworks: go left towards a hanging, high-tech exhibit that includes a tangle of wires and exposed circuitry and a motionless robotic arm, or right towards a chest-height, curvilinear plinth topped with black foam and displaying a dozen small, pinkish objects. Review by Rebecca Morrill

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

staring forms: Miranda Blennerhassett, Aleana Egan, Andreas Kindler von Knobloch, Tanad Williams

staring forms, installation image, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Mid-way through ‘A Game of Chess’, the second section of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem ‘The Waste Land’, come the words that have lent themselves to the title of ‘staring forms’, a new group exhibition in Dublin’s Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. In these lines Eliot references the ancient (and violent) Greek myth of King Tereus and the sisters Philomela and Procne, all three of whom were turned into birds by the gods. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Heidi Schwegler and Quayola: Plane of Scattered Pasts

Athazagoraphobia

In ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ at Upfor Gallery in Portland, Oregon, artists Heidi Schwegler and Quayola explore object histories and the fragmentation process with sculptural works and video. Schwegler amends, recasts, and highlights aged objects to reframe their value. Quayola’s video piece ‘Strata #1’ (2008) invigorates the exhibition with immersive sound and vivid colour. While the show focuses on the fragmented form, ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ is conceptually complete. Review by Lindsay Costello

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Kettle's Yard, Castle Street, Cambridge, CB3 0AQ

Oscar Murillo: Violent Amnesia

Oscar Murillo, Violent Amnesia, 2019. Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge

“No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” Oscar Murillo’s current exhibition at Kettle’s Yard starts with these words by John Donne. This quote is a testimony of the artist’s mourning for his friend, Nigerian curator and unique contributor to the art world, Okwui Enwezor, who died earlier this year. But it makes me think that if Murillo were an island, he would have been a floating island. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Denmark Pavilion, Giardini, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2019: Larissa Sansour: Heirloom

Larissa Sansour and Søren Lind. Installation view of In Vitro, 2-channel black and white film. 27 mins 44 secs, 2019.

Danish-Palestinian artist Larissa Sansour’s project for the Danish Pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale is comprised of two key elements: a sculptural installation comprising a large, dark orb; and a science-fiction film titled’ In Vitro’, depicting the relationship between two women after an ecological disaster has driven them to live underground. Review by Anna Souter

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Copperfield Gallery, 6 Copperfield Street, London SE1 0EP

Alba Folgado in conversation with Marco Godoy

Marco Godoy: My we, your we, our we. Installation view at Copperfield, London

Alba Folgado speaks to artist Marco Godoy about his exhibition My we, your we, our we at Copperfield Gallery. His interest in the complexity of power relationships and the mechanisms that are used to perpetuate social divisions are made evident through the different works that one finds in the space.

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Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Krymsky Val, 9 строение 32, Moskva, Russia, 119049

Pavel Pepperstein: The Human as a Frame for the Landscape

Pavel Pepperstein, The Human as a Frame for the Landscape, installation view, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, 2019

The work of Pavel Pepperstein is, to western audiences, often impenetrable — not least because it often relies upon references to in-jokes and Russian-Language text. Pepperstein is interested in exploding-out historical moments and psychedelic experiences and picking through the debris. He’s called it “the spiritual backstage”. Review by Lucy Holt

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Anna-Sophie Berger: A Failed Play

A Failed Play, Installation View, 2019, Anna-Sophie Berger

It is fitting that the accompanying exhibition text for ‘A Failed Play’, written by Anna Sophie-Berger herself, opens with a story that leaves out the play entirely. The focus is on everything but - Beckett’s declaration of it as a failure, his begrudging agreement to translate it for publication in English, and the fight that ensued over copyright following his death. Review by India Nielsen

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MK Gallery, 900 Midsummer Blvd, Milton Keynes MK9 3QA

The Lie of the Land

The Crowning

Milton Keynes is quite unlike any other place in the UK. A new, modernist town built in the 1960s to provide somewhere to live for people who worked in London. A town built out of concrete, marble and glass. A town built on a grid. A few decades later the place became known as a haven for various subcultures; ravers, skateboarders and boy racers all flocked to the town, youthful rebellion disrupting the grid. Review by Ryan Hughes

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VITRINE, Basel, Vogesenpl. 15, 4056 Basel, Switzerland

If it’s not meant to last, then it’s Performance: A Q&A with Alys Williams

If it's not meant to last, this it's Performance, 2019. Installation view. VITRINE, Basel.

VITRINE, Basel’s current group exhibition explores how transient artworks are challenging the existing systems of value surrounding art. ‘If it’s not meant to last, then it’s Performance’ brings together work by Tim Etchells, Paul Hage Boutros, Sophie Jung, Clare Kenny, Hannah Lees, Wil Murray, and Rafal Zajko. Alys Williams, the curator, talks about how the exhibition came to be and the ways in which performance is reshaping the art market. Interview by Susie Pentelow

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, Shadwell, London E1 7QX

Is This Tomorrow?

Jacolby Satterwhite and Andrés \Jaque / Office for Political Innovation, 2019, Spirits Roaming the Earth

'Is This Tomorrow?’ has invited architects and artists to work together to create a series of installations on the future, many of whom are working together for the first time. But whereas the 1956 exhibition aimed to position the arts as a positive and driving force for society, in ‘Is This Tomorrow?’ it is wider developments, be they technological, social or political, that become the dangerous forces the collaborators seek to address. Review by Bernard Hay

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6, Roppongi, Minato City, Tokyo, Japan

Roppongi Crossing 2019: Connexions

Alter, [* Still image from: Justine Emard, Soul Shift, 2018, Video 6 min.]

Every three years the Mori Art Museum organises a new edition of ‘Roppongi Crossing’, a survey exhibition that presents a “snapshot” of Japan’s contemporary art scene. Begun in 2004, this year’s take on recent goings-on has been organised by the in-house curatorial team of Tsubaki Reiko, Tokuyama Hirokazu and Kumakura Haruko around the theme Connexions. Review by John Gayer

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