Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2PH

Jeff Koons

Gazing Ball (Rubens Tiger Hunt)

There’s a frustrating quote from Jeff Koons in the catalogue accompaniment to a new exhibition of his artwork at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. “I’ve tried to make work,” it says, “that any viewer, no matter where they came from […] would have to say that on some level “Yes, I like it.” If they couldn’t do that, it would only be because they had been told they were not supposed to.” Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Emmie McLuskey: these were the things that made the step familiar

these were the things that made the step familiar, Collective, 2019

The eight large scale screen print collages, audio works, printed matter and gymnastic ‘furniture' that make up Glasgow-based artist Emmie McLuskey's installation at Collective look at the shared poetics of the filmmaker and choreographer by analysing, describing and recording the body, through its interactions and its gestures, between rest and motion. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Koenig Gallery, 121, Alexandrinenstraße 118, 10969 Berlin

Helen Marten: Fixed Sky Situation

People, terms in barking (us)

For her most recent exhibition titled ‘Fixed Sky Situation’ at Koenig Galerie, Turner and Hepworth Prize winner Helen Marten presents eight new works, including three complex installations and five large paintings that circle the space like secular polyptychs. Review by Anais Castro

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MO Museum, Pylimo g. 17, Vilnius 01141, Lithuania

All Art Is About Us

Installation view, All Art is About Us exhibition, MO Museum, Vilnius.

The inaugural exhibition, ‘All Art is About Us’, is made up predominantly of painting, video installation and photography from the museum’s collection of Lithuanian art. Review by Gulnaz Can

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The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

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John Hansard Gallery, 142-144 Above Bar Street, Southampton, SO14 7DU

Siobhán Hapaska: Snake and Apple

Siobhan Hapaska, installation view, John Hansard Gallery, 2019

The ground level of John Hansard Gallery plays host to the recent productions of Irish artist Siobhán Hapaska. Four large sculptures zigzag the length of the room, while the world outside becomes part of the exhibition, like a film projected through the gallery’s giant windows. The artist’s work prompts a wake-up slap as it translates Greek tragedy-scale despair into our current day goings on. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019

Sofia Mitsola, Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019, installation view

For its spring show, Jerwood Visual Arts has commissioned new bodies of work from three artists at pivotal points in their careers: Kitty Clark, Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom and Sofia Mitsola. This is the fourth iteration of Jerwood Solo Presentations, and the guidance notes explain that there is no curatorial theme uniting the chosen artists; these are three very different offerings, but each is powerful in its own way. Review by Anna Souter

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Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome

Installation views: Art Now: Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome, 2018

In the single-room space Tate Britain has devoted to the current ‘Art Now’ exhibition, there’s a crooked forest made from crutches and open ring-binders, clustered in front of a wall with a large, cartoonish hole punched through it. The piece is Jesse Darling’s ‘St Jerome in the Wilderness’ (2018). Walking between the sticks and peering into the gap in the wall, you’re confronted with the slapstick tragedy of physical existence. ‘Brazen Serpent’ (2018), a walking-stick coiled to look like a snake, seems to follow you through the “trees”. In trying to protect or medicate ourselves, perhaps we’re in fact acknowledging our own fragility. You can’t avoid the threat implicit within contingency plans. Review by Adam Heardman

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Workplace, The Old Post Office, 19-21 West Street Gateshead, Tyne & Wear NE8 1AD

Emily Hesse: The Taste of this History: A Church in my Mouth

Emily Hesse The, Shedding: The Glass Ceiling, 2018, Collage on found photograph, 43.25 x 57.5 x 3 cm

Hesse’s questioning of her own proximity to the notional centre of the art is illustrated by the circle drawn on the gallery floor that the pin hangs above - is she inside or outside the circuit of acceptance? The artist can be heard reading from her book ‘Black Birds Born from Invisible Stars’ which details touchingly her frequently disenchanting encounters with art institutions. Review by Piers Masterson

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MCA Denver, 1485 Delgany Street, 80202, USA

Tara Donovan: Fieldwork

Untitled (Mylar), 2011, Mylar and hot glue, Dimensions variable, Site-specific installation

On a physical and material level, but most crucially on a metaphysical and referential plane, Donovan's works multiply, fold and expand beyond the sum of their parts. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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William Benington Gallery, unit 3, 50 Tower Bridge Rd, London SE1 4TR

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts #06 and #07

This is a show in two parts, the first of which blurs the artistic personas of the two artists in displaying a deconstructed functionless kit of parts throughout the gallery space, before – in part two – being reconfigured into a bench and other wall-based pieces, at which point the two artists’ practices are clearly delineated. Review by Matthew Turner

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Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London SE5 7RW

Evy Jokhova: Weighed down by stones

Totem XII, 2018, MDF, paint, castor wheels, Perspex, acoustic felt, stone collection, motion sensors, computer, headphones, 60 x 60 x 152 cm (detail)

At Lily Brooke, Evy Jokhova’s latest installation ‘Weighed down by stones’ is archaeological, concerning the weight of the past upon the present and the possibility of returning to it. Review by Jacob Charles Wilson

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Rennes

Rennes Biennale 2018: Cries and Echoes

Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, 40m Cube, Les Ateliers de Rennes

Siham and Hafida are two singers of the Aita, a musical genre of the Chikha. Their intergenerational conversations throughout the film give insight to how lived experience is transmitted and challenged by the fact that the younger generations learn the treats of the Aita through clips on youtube. Review by Helena Julian

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