Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Lydia Ourahmane: The you in us

Lydia Ourahmane, In the Absence of our Mothers (2018). Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

A golden tooth is unassumingly mounted on a pin, sticking out of the wall. A cabinet with documents is standing next to it. In the middle hangs an x-ray. It takes another moment to realise a low humming is coming from the floorboards. It finds resonance with the room, with the bodies in it, and creates a feeling of being ‘within’ something latently present. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Hestercombe Gallery, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton, Somerset TA2 8LG

Odyssean: Topographies

Natasha Rosling and Vilma Luostarinen, Edible Coastlines, 2018.

Beginning high up in the Orkney Isles and journeying to the South West of England, ‘Odyssean: Topographies’ is a cognitive, visual and, at times, physical expedition into hidden and imagined spaces. The culmination of four artists' Orkney-based residencies, the exhibition throws into question the ways in which humans formulate perceptions of nature and place in an era rife with technology. Review by Selina Oakes

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650mAh, Mist Vape Shop, 41 Western Road, Hove, BN3 1JD

Jack Lavender - Sorry I haven’t been

Jack Lavender, Untitled (car cover, stereo, lights, resin statue), 2018

LED lights trace the floor’s edge and bathe the room in a purple haze. The beams evoke the luminescence of whizzing cars on the motorway and trigger nostalgic memories of long night-time drives and the open road – Lavender’s car hurtles down a motorway of a bygone time. Review by Sophie Ruigrok

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Cass Sculpture Foundation, New Barn Hill, Goodwood, West Sussex PO18 0QP

The Sleeping Procession

CASS Projects: The Sleeping Procession exhibition. Curated by Sean Steadman and Gabriel Hartley

‘The Sleeping Procession’, a bright and upbeat group exhibition curated by emerging artists Gabriel Hartley and Sean Steadman occupies the gallery with ease. It is a jovial gathering, inspired by the Foundation’s archive of maquettes which the pair have put in dialogue with works by their peers and a number of artists whose work they have found influential. Review by Rebecca Partridge

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Pump House Gallery, Battersea Park, London SW11 4NJ

Sriwhana Spong: a hook but no fish

Sriwhana Spong, a hook but no fish installation view, 2017.

Sophie Risner reviews a presentation of work by Sriwhana Spong which takes the work of twelfth century female mystic named Hildegard von Bingen as its central reference point.

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories from Across the Arab World

Joe Namy, Red Filled the Intervals; Between the Musical Notes, 2017/2017. Courtesy of the artist. Installation shot, From Ear to Ear to Eye, Nottingham Contemporary, Dec 2017- Mar 2018. Photo Stuart Whipps.

‘From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories From Across the Arab World’ at Nottingham Contemporary explores sound, music and listening in the Arab world, revealing different layers of meaning, intertwined histories, complicated political situations and complex questions. This expansive exhibition spreads across six rooms and showcases works by almost 20 artists who work with sound, are musicians or explore oral stories. Review by Roma Piotrowska

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Hauser & Wirth London, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Monika Sosnowska: Structural Exercises

Installation view, Monika Sosnowska. Structural Exercises, Hauser & Wirth London,  1 December 2017 to 10 February 2018

Monika Sosnowska is known for turning space into her canvas and the exhibition of new work by the artist currently on show at Hauser & Wirth’s space in Savile Row is no different. Titled ‘Structural Exercises,’ it is both a display of sculptures and an immersive installation – large scale structures extend in space so ambitiously as to transcend the boundaries between each other. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Chiba City Museum of Art: 3 Chome-10-8 Chuo, Chiba, Chiba Prefecture 260-0013, Japan

Tsuyoshi Ozawa: Imperfection: Parallel Art History

Imperfection

Tsuyoshi Ozawa not only interrogates modern Japanese art history, illuminating the unique and sometimes odd pathways it has taken, he also questions the acts of looking and showing. He is distinct from Takashi Murakami, who proudly proclaimed the value of forgotten history by pushing anime-like figures to the forefront. Ozawa keeps an unstable and ambiguous position, enjoying the diverse and imaginative visions sustained by his perspicacity and sense of humour. Review by Kodama Kanazawa

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National Galleries of Scotland, 73 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DS

NOW | Susan Philipsz, Michael Armitage, Yto Barrada, Kate Davis, Hiwa K, Sarah Rose

Seven Tears, 2016

NOW is the second in a six-part series of exhibitions presented by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art exploring the work of international contemporary artists. It is dominated by a 5 room display of works by the artist Susan Philipsz alongside works by renowned artists Kate Davis, Sarah Rose, Hiwa K, Michael Armitage and Yto Barrada. Review by Rosie Priest

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Stanley Picker Gallery, Kingston University, London Kingston School of Art, Grange Road, Kingston upon Thames KT1 2QJ

P!CKER, PART II Céline Condorelli: Prologue

Céline Condorelli, ‘Prologue' (2017), installation view, Stanley Picker Gallery at Kingston University London.

Condorelli’s prologue is merely the latest episode in a continuous process of exchange and renewal, where the legacy of a project – in this case both Lustig Cohen’s show, and Condorelli’s own show at P! last year – is archived, mined and reworked, forming new projects, new exhibitions, and new ways of understanding the contexts within which we work. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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The Geffen Contemporary At MOCA, 152 N Central Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90012, USA

Adrián Villar Rojas: The Theater of Disappearance

MOCA presents Adrián Villar Rojas: The Theater of Disappearance, a site-specific installation inside The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA’s warehouse space. Villar Rojas (b. 1980, Rosario, Argentina) has built a singular practice by creating environments and objects that seem to be in search of their place in time. Villar Rojas’s interventions beckon viewers to consider fragments that exist in a slippery space between the future, the past, and an alternate reality in the present. With his post-human artworks, Villar Rojas posits the question: What happens after the end of art?

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover Street, London W1S 4NJ

Lee Bul: After Bruno Taut

Lee Bul, After Bruno Taut, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Through complex and elaborate works, Lee Bul portrays failed models that echo the qualities of utopian systems of early twentieth century architecture as well as the politics of totalitarian regimes. The works displayed in ‘After Bruno Taut’ at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac strongly emphasise the excess and fragility of our world, and our failure to control it. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Plymouth Arts Centre, 38 Looe Street, Plymouth, PL4 0EB

Clare Thornton: Materials of Resistance installation view

Clare Thornton: Materials of Resistance installation view

In Clare Thornton’s current solo exhibition, Materials of Resistance, showing work from the last seven years, delicate materials – including the body itself and those that stand in for it – are put at risk and tested to breaking point. Review by Ellen Wilkinson

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Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 & 11 Duke Street St James's, London SW1Y 6BN

Phillip King: Colour on Fire & Ceramics 1995-2017

Phillip King, Ceramics 1995-2017, 2017. Installation view

The ceramics mark a key departure in King’s work; where previously he had produced mainly large coloured sculptures in steel and plastic, the unglazed vessels speak a quieter aesthetic language. Review by Samuel Glanville

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