Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Talbot Rice Gallery, University of Edinburgh, South Bridge, Edinburgh EH8 9YL

Stephen Sutcliffe: Sex Symbols in Sandwich Signs

Stephen Sutcliffe, Sex Symbols in Sandwich Signs (2017). Installation view.

Stephen Sutcliffe’s exhibition at Talbot Rice Gallery opens a moving image season showcasing recent work by three highly-regarded practitioners noted for the referential density of their work, through an ever-closing margin between documentary and fiction and manifested through exuberant styles. Review by Alex Hetherington

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The Koppel Project Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

The Hive Mind

The Hive Mind installation downstairs

‘The Hive Mind’ is a group exhibition consisting of sculpture, painting, video and print work by new and established artists, that probes the question of connectivity in an increasingly dysfunctional and meaningless reality. Review by Evie Ward

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome

Installation view at the Whitechapel Gallery, Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome (7 June - 10 September 2017)

‘The Trickle-Down Syndrome’ is a large-scale installation, which consists of five interconnected yet individual rooms, inspired both by 1930s backdrops of Hollywood director Busby Berkeley and the Surrealist works of Max Ernst. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ

Yuri Pattison: user, space

Yuri Pattison, user, space (2016). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2016. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Courtesy of the artist; mother's tankstation limited, Dublin; Helga Maria Klosterfelde, Berlin; and Labor, Mexico.

A long table surrounded by Ikea-style chairs runs through the centre of the gallery, while in one corner, a separate environment for relaxing houses oversized cushions and shelves of plants. And everywhere, there is the physical manifestation of tech: wires, adapters, servers, computers, and cameras, creating a cacophony of noise that hums throughout the installation. Review by William Rees

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Barbican, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop

 Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop 9 October 2015 - 10 January 2016

The spine of the exhibition is ‘Revolution’ - a 30-minute video displayed on five monitors throughout the gallery and accompanied by a live choreographed performance. This mash up of dancers in a studio performing strong, synchronised choreography, Kool FM DJs jamming to Drum & Bass and Peake family home videos dictates the throbbing, erratic rhythm that permeates the space. Review by Alex Borkowski

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 24 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Sunset Décor - Curated by Magalí Arriola

Sunset Décor 2017 Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Installation view

At a time when populations, cultures and the environment are fighting to resist conservative thinking and political assault, Sunset Décor puts into perspective the instrumentalization, now as then, of nature, the individual and the land for the production of a symbolic order in the name of freedom, civilization and democracy.

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Lodos gallery, García Icazbalceta #30, Colonia San Rafael Mexico City, Mx. 06470

Korakrit Arunanondchai

Installation View

Lodos presents Korakrit Arunanondchai's first exhibition in Mexico and Latin America. The show features a single piece installation which houses his recent video 'Painting with History in a Room Filled With People With Funny Names 3.'

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Carlos/Ishikawa, Unit 4, 88 Mile End Road, London, E1 4UN

Richard Sides: Invisible World

Invisible World, Installation View

The lighting, music and layout are such key parts of Richard Sides' work that 'Invisible World' is an exhibition to experience rather than see. João Abbott-Gribben reviews Sides' solo show at Carlos/Ishikawa gallery in London.

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Capitain Petzel, Karl-Marx-Allee 45, 10178 Berlin

Sarah Morris: Cloak and Dagger

Metropolis

The second solo exhibition by Sarah Morris at Capitain Petzel, Berlin, Cloak and Dagger, sees a new and recent films and paintings examine the fictional, internal and external architectural landscape inhabited by Fritz Lang who directed the film noir classic, Cloak and Dagger, from which the exhibition gets its title.

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Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 25 Arthur St, Edinburgh, EH6 5DA

You hardboiled     I softboiled

Installation view, You hardboiled I softboiled, Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, 2017 (Valerie Norris, Music for Intelligent Young Ladies (2013), and, bedroom furniture (2013)).

In this intriguingly titled and intimately composed exhibition, ideas of how love and its stories might be practiced, sought and appropriated move between the published page and spoken word, and are heard through sound and audio. Love is also framed within filmed moments and presented in painted gestures; it is seen in close proximity and recognised across vast distances. The love stories described here are sensed in places, portraits, correspondences and spectres. Review by Alex Hetherington

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BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA

BALTIC Artists’ Award

Eric N. Mack, A Lesson in Perspective 2017, activated by participant, BALTIC Artists' Award 2017, installation view, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art Gateshead.

The BALTIC Artists’ Award is a clear attempt to combat some of the issues associated with prize exhibitions through a format that provides an actual and equal opportunity for four artists to develop and showcase significant new bodies of work. The award has no limit on age or nationality, is selected by some of the world’s leading contemporary artists (who also mentor the shortlisted artists) and has no ‘winners’ or ‘losers,’ with prize money (totalling £30,000 per artist) shared equally amongst the four. Review by Amy Jones

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Various, The Azores

Walk&Talk

Walk&Talk 2017, Joao Paulo, Serafim Naturalis Historiae

For the last seven years, the contemporary art festival Walk&Talk, has been bringing international artists to the Azores to make work in the galleries, museums, and streets of Ponta Delgada and further afield across the rest of São Miguel and Terceira. This year’s programme engages with the unique location, natural environment and history of the islands with playful, self-referential and at times antagonistic artworks considering what it means to live and make work at the periphery. Review by Jessie Bond

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

Kaari Upson: Good thing you are not alone

Kaari Upson: Good Thing You Are Not Alone, 2017. New Museum, New York.

‘Good thing you are not alone’, the Los Angeles-based artist Kaari Upson’s first solo museum exhibition in New York City’s New Museum, immediately follows her also having participated and contributed to the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2017 Biennial, which took place not too far uptown in Manhattan. Timing aside, the exhibition is also notable for its size, promising to be of particular interest in providing a glimpse into what Upson’s been up to in the last number of years, especially since having possibly moved on from the monumental ‘Larry Project’, an omnipresence in her practice since the early 2000s. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Manchester International Festival, various venues

Manchester International Festival

What is the City but the People launch event for Manchester International Festival.

Incorporating a programme of music, dance, theatre and contemporary art, Manchester International Festival is expansive. With daily broadcasts by BBC 6 Music’s Radcliffe and Maconie and regular email updates on what to do at MIF landing in my inbox, it can be difficult to find one’s own way into and through the programme beyond the mediated story of the festival with its pervasive marketing and slick imagery. Yet perhaps this very mediation provides an additional facet to the theme of storytelling that seems to echo throughout MIF’s varied programme. Laura Mansfield reviews

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