Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, 42-44 Pollard Row, London E2 6NB

Ian Giles: Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag

Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag, presented by Gasworks and videoclub

Before occupying their own spaces, queer communities would gather at ‘gay nights’ in establishments where drinks prices were raised for punters with no alternative. Subverting previous migratory notions, Ian Giles presented ‘Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag’ at the queer-run Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club. The event featured a screening of his new film by the same name, alongside video works by five other artists that discuss the past, present and future of queer spaces. Review by Ryan Kearney

Further reading +

Castor, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Alan Magee: Data Dust, Dust Data

Celestial Machines Drop ceiling, Light panel, Screen, Video, Robotic arm, Arduino, Raspberry pi and Circuitry 130 x 130 x 95cm, 2019

Upon entering ‘Data Dust, Dust Data’, Alan Magee’s second exhibition at Castor Projects, the visitor is immediately confronted by two contrasting artworks: go left towards a hanging, high-tech exhibit that includes a tangle of wires and exposed circuitry and a motionless robotic arm, or right towards a chest-height, curvilinear plinth topped with black foam and displaying a dozen small, pinkish objects. Review by Rebecca Morrill

Further reading +

Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Heidi Schwegler and Quayola: Plane of Scattered Pasts

Athazagoraphobia

In ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ at Upfor Gallery in Portland, Oregon, artists Heidi Schwegler and Quayola explore object histories and the fragmentation process with sculptural works and video. Schwegler amends, recasts, and highlights aged objects to reframe their value. Quayola’s video piece ‘Strata #1’ (2008) invigorates the exhibition with immersive sound and vivid colour. While the show focuses on the fragmented form, ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ is conceptually complete. Review by Lindsay Costello

Further reading +

Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Pedro Neves Marques: It Bites Back

Pedro Neves Marques, It Bites Back, 2019 (featuring music by HAUT). Exhibition view at Gasworks, London.

Through the in-depth analysis of virus warfare and the rising number of actions against queer bodies around the globe, the exhibition ‘It Bites Back’ draws on distinguishing power agents, such as hormones and fluids, as symbols for forces that reign in our everyday lives and which define the 21st century’s approach to biopolitics. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +

Denmark Pavilion, Giardini, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2019: Larissa Sansour: Heirloom

Larissa Sansour and Søren Lind. Installation view of In Vitro, 2-channel black and white film. 27 mins 44 secs, 2019.

Danish-Palestinian artist Larissa Sansour’s project for the Danish Pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale is comprised of two key elements: a sculptural installation comprising a large, dark orb; and a science-fiction film titled’ In Vitro’, depicting the relationship between two women after an ecological disaster has driven them to live underground. Review by Anna Souter

Further reading +

Copperfield Gallery, 6 Copperfield Street, London SE1 0EP

Alba Folgado in conversation with Marco Godoy

Marco Godoy: My we, your we, our we. Installation view at Copperfield, London

Alba Folgado speaks to artist Marco Godoy about his exhibition My we, your we, our we at Copperfield Gallery. His interest in the complexity of power relationships and the mechanisms that are used to perpetuate social divisions are made evident through the different works that one finds in the space.

Further reading +

Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1F 9DY

Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

Installation View of Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

‘Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium’ presents an extensive exhibition by the late American artist and writer Allan Sekula (1951-2013). While the title aims to highlight the medium’s aporias, the show extends across photography, performance, text, and video, contrasting photography’s material mediations with its claim to realism. Review by Hugh Nicholson

Further reading +

6, Roppongi, Minato City, Tokyo, Japan

Roppongi Crossing 2019: Connexions

Alter, [* Still image from: Justine Emard, Soul Shift, 2018, Video 6 min.]

Every three years the Mori Art Museum organises a new edition of ‘Roppongi Crossing’, a survey exhibition that presents a “snapshot” of Japan’s contemporary art scene. Begun in 2004, this year’s take on recent goings-on has been organised by the in-house curatorial team of Tsubaki Reiko, Tokuyama Hirokazu and Kumakura Haruko around the theme Connexions. Review by John Gayer

Further reading +

Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Geta Brătescu: The Power of the Line

Geta Brătescu, Jocul formelor (Game of Forms), 2010, Collage, drawing on paper, 4 parts, 45 x 60 cm

Hauser & Wirth, working closely with the artist before her death and with Ivan Gallery, has put together a museum-quality exhibition of this remarkable artist’s work. The show draws together pieces from the last decade, a period in which Brătescu’s practice focused on working with the line as a structuring principle. Review by Anna Souter

Further reading +

Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham, NG1 2GB

Elizabeth Price: FELT TIP

Elizabeth Price, KOHL (still), 2018

Elizabeth Price’s solo show at Nottingham Contemporary brings together three new works. Each departs from a moment in late 20th century British history: a period marked by the collapse of the organized Left, the systematic dismantling of union power, and the programmatic reconstitution of the working class. Review by Hugh Nicholson

Further reading +

Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 4PY

FOCUS: Agnes Martin

FOCUS: Agnes Martin. Installation view, Levy Gorvy, London, 2019.

This is an artist who spent her life in the pursuit of abstract painting: grids and stripes, minimal yet expressive abstractions, imperfect horizontal lines in soft, pastel shades and faint, pencil-drawn grids. A similarly meditative, light-bathed atmosphere pervades the film, and it is a revelation to see Martin’s artistic vision realised in the bread-and-butter reality of the physical landscape. Review by Clare Robson

Further reading +

Kadist, 19bis/21 rue des Trois Frères, Paris, 75018, France

Affective Utopia

Reynier Leyva Novo, A Thousand and One Times Revolution, 2009-2018, exhibition view Affective Utopia, KADIST, Paris.

Imagining utopia seems to have become the principal task of artists as of late, any speculative, social practice is quickly branded as such. So much so that the title of Kadist’s latest exhibition ‘Affective Utopia’ almost washes past unnoticed. Review by Jessica Saxby

Further reading +

FACT, 88 Wood Street, Liverpool, L1 4DQ

Ericka Beckman & Marianna Simnett

Marianna Simnett films (Blood and The Udder)

Ericka Beckman and Marianna Simnett show the human female to be a rebellious creature, a feisty character, courageously challenging the dogma and stereotypical norms of her world. However, they do this in very contrasting ways and herein lies the intrinsic value of this exhibition. Review by Samantha Browne

Further reading +

Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone: Webb-Ellis, Richard Whitby

The Lost Ones by Richard Whitby as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone exhibition at Jerwood Space

‘Going, Gone’ is the latest installment of the Jerwood/FVU Awards, and brings us two newly-commissioned films by winning artists Richard Whitby and Webb-Ellis. This year’s work ‘takes Britain’s declared exit from the European Union as a starting point for reflection on other collective experiences of transition and loss. Review by Jack Head

Further reading +