Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstraße 7, 10963 Berlin

The Garden of Earthly Delights

Homo sapiens sapiens

Taking its point of departure and title from Hieronymus Bosch’s ‘Garden of Earthly Delights’ (1490-1510), the current exhibition at Gropius Bau brings together the wide-ranging work of twenty international artists. The state of the garden serves as a microcosmic starting point, from which expansive ideas and wider dialogues emerge about colonialism, systems of sharing, borders and structures of thought. With contributing artists including Yayoi Kusama, Pipilotti Rist, Hicham Berrada and more, the exhibition moves from the paradisiacal to the provocative, the reflective to the revolutionary, and shifts between global and individual lenses. Review by Eva Szwarc

Further reading +

Republic of Korea Pavilion, Giardini, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2019: History Has Failed Us, but No Matter

Dancer from the Peninsula

The title of the pavilion is ‘History Has Failed Us But No Matter’, curated by Hyunjim Kim, and nods to a struggle against the social and geopolitical framework that a person is born into, yet simultaneously, understanding yourself in relation to this framework. Kim has worked with three female artists; a first in the pavilion's history. Together the artists, Hwayeon Nam, siren eun young jung and Jane Jin Kaise, challenge ideas related to tradition and the canon of gender, mediating on the emancipatory potential of tradition (opposed to tradition being a barrier) for East Asian women. Review by Laura O’Leary

Further reading +

Luma Foundation, Parc des Ateliers 45 Chemin des Minimes, Arles, France

Rachel Rose: Enclosure

Rachel Rose, Enclosure, Luma Arles, Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers, Arles (France), July 1 - September 22, 2019

‘Would you not too hunt the god who killed your child for no reason?’ asks a vagabond, playing the role of prophet by predicting future misfortunes in a pre-capitalist society. In her newest film, ‘Enclosure’ (2019), on view at Luma Foundation, Arles, New-York based artist Rachel Rose (b. 1986) continues to expand on her notions of land, ownership, and violence against women in the context of early seventeenth-century rural England. The work attests to the artist’s fluency in cinematic conventions even as she pushes their boundaries. Review by Angela Blanc

Further reading +

Irish Museum of Modern Art, Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Military Rd, Kilmainham, Dublin 8, Ireland

Kim Gordon: She bites her tender mind

Proposal For A Dance (still)

Kim Gordon first came to prominence in the mid-80s as a member of the noise band Sonic Youth - co-founded with her ex-husband Thurston Moore and active until 2011, when both the band and marriage dissolved. Since then Gordon has become a polymath: releasing music from several projects, embarking on an acting career, writing the acclaimed ‘Girl in a Band’ memoir on her years in Sonic Youth, and focusing on her visual art practice that took a backseat during her tenure with the band. It is this last category that sees us drawn to Dublin’s Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) to see Gordon’s latest exhibition ‘She bites her tender mind’. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

French Pavilion, Giardini, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2019: Laure Prouvost: Deep See Blue Surrounding You

Laure Prouvost, Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, French Pavilion at the 58th Venice Biennale, 2019. © Laure Prouvost; Courtesy Lisson Gallery, carlier | gebauer, and Galerie Nathalie Obadia. Photography by Cristian

A frenetic filmed odyssey from the utopian Tours Nuages tower blocks of Nanterre in the Parisian suburbs, via the vast expanse of the Marseillais coastline and ending in the grubby canals of Venice, ‘Deep See Blue Surrounding You’ comprises frantic scenes that last just seconds, cutting back to raspberries under rocks, horse hooves on orange peel, performers spewing lettuce, the plump frisson of eyeballs and bum cheeks, and the various jellies of assorted sea creatures. Review by Jessica Saxby

Further reading +

ICA,The Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5AH

I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker

Installation view of I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker at ICA, London, 2019

Kathy Acker was a plagiarist, a pirate, an emblem of postmodernism, a fascinating and complicated person, but most importantly, she was a writer. A literary exhibition is a challenging project, and so fuelled by a desire to see what curatorial decisions would locate writing visually, I went to see ‘I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker’ at the ICA - surely if any writer can sustain an exhibition it would be Acker. Review by Katie McCain

Further reading +

Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Lis Rhodes: Dissident Lines

Light Music

“Write the first lines last”, says Lis Rhodes in a voiceover. “Ambiguous journeys have many beginnings”. In her films, which are socially diagnostic as much as they are aesthetically rich, Rhodes recognises one of the most important linguistic truths of our time. Hypocrisy is an echo, the same thing twice in two ways. Review by Adam Heardman

Further reading +

KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Auguststraße 69, 10117 Berlin, Germany

Schering Stiftung Art Award 2018: Anna Daučíková

Upbringing by Touch

The current exhibition at KW Institute presents the work of Anna Daučíková through video, photography and sculpture. Spanning the past five decades, the body of work refuses linearity, welcomes the experimental possibilities between the artist and her materials, and opens up to wider discourses on identity. Review by Eva Szwarc

Further reading +

Fondazione Prada, Largo Isarco, 2, 20139 Milano MI, Italy

Lizzie Fitch | Ryan Trecartin: Whether Line

Exhibition view of Lizzie Fitch | Ryan Trecartin: Whether Line, Fondazione Prada, 2019

Lizzie Fitch and Ryan Trecartin’s new commission at Fondazione Prada is a trip in hyper-reality through means of immersive installations and role-play video performances. The multimedia exhibition unfolds as a journey into different physical and psychosocial spaces - from Milan to the core of contemporary (American) culture, via Ohio’s countryside. Review by Giulia Civardi

Further reading +

Delfina Foundation, 29/31 Catherine Place, London SW1E 6DY

Asunción Molinos Gordo: Accumulation by Dispossession

Asunción Molinos Gordo, Accumulation by Dispossession, 2019. Exhibition at Delfina Foundation

As a part of the current programme at Delfina Foundation, ‘The Politics of Food’, the artist Asunción Molinos Gordo draws on ideas and techniques responding to the destructive system of food production and its ambivalent, two-faced character. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +

Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, 42-44 Pollard Row, London E2 6NB

Ian Giles: Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag

Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag, presented by Gasworks and videoclub

Before occupying their own spaces, queer communities would gather at ‘gay nights’ in establishments where drinks prices were raised for punters with no alternative. Subverting previous migratory notions, Ian Giles presented ‘Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag’ at the queer-run Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club. The event featured a screening of his new film by the same name, alongside video works by five other artists that discuss the past, present and future of queer spaces. Review by Ryan Kearney

Further reading +

Castor, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Alan Magee: Data Dust, Dust Data

Celestial Machines Drop ceiling, Light panel, Screen, Video, Robotic arm, Arduino, Raspberry pi and Circuitry 130 x 130 x 95cm, 2019

Upon entering ‘Data Dust, Dust Data’, Alan Magee’s second exhibition at Castor Projects, the visitor is immediately confronted by two contrasting artworks: go left towards a hanging, high-tech exhibit that includes a tangle of wires and exposed circuitry and a motionless robotic arm, or right towards a chest-height, curvilinear plinth topped with black foam and displaying a dozen small, pinkish objects. Review by Rebecca Morrill

Further reading +

Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St, Portland, OR 97209, USA

Heidi Schwegler and Quayola: Plane of Scattered Pasts

Athazagoraphobia

In ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ at Upfor Gallery in Portland, Oregon, artists Heidi Schwegler and Quayola explore object histories and the fragmentation process with sculptural works and video. Schwegler amends, recasts, and highlights aged objects to reframe their value. Quayola’s video piece ‘Strata #1’ (2008) invigorates the exhibition with immersive sound and vivid colour. While the show focuses on the fragmented form, ‘Plane of Scattered Pasts’ is conceptually complete. Review by Lindsay Costello

Further reading +

Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Pedro Neves Marques: It Bites Back

Pedro Neves Marques, It Bites Back, 2019 (featuring music by HAUT). Exhibition view at Gasworks, London.

Through the in-depth analysis of virus warfare and the rising number of actions against queer bodies around the globe, the exhibition ‘It Bites Back’ draws on distinguishing power agents, such as hormones and fluids, as symbols for forces that reign in our everyday lives and which define the 21st century’s approach to biopolitics. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +