Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Ghislaine Leung: CONSTITUTION

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery evades concise summation. Description becomes easily lost in particularities, or overlooks specific works altogether. Review by Hugh Nicholson

Further reading +

Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd: Joins

Joins, Installation View, 2019, Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd

At the end of a long outdoor corridor filled with palms and tropical plants is Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd’s exhibition ‘Joins’ at Cell Project Space in East London. Bringing together a series of recent works, in addition to two spatial interventions in the gallery, the show explores the infrastructures that produce contemporary domestic space. Review by Bernard Hay

Further reading +

arebyte Gallery, 7 Botanic Square, Leamouth Peninsula, London E14 0LG

RE-FIGURE-GROUND

Amina Ross, by your hands I open spill out. I'm the inside of an egg I pour we bloom magma rushing from a jagged crown of earth molten and dangerous and alive can't you feel (2018)

‘RE-FIGURE-GROUND’ asks us to re-examine our current positions and proposes alternative futures that go beyond the boundaries of race, gender and sex. Review by Julia Schouten

Further reading +

Van Gogh Museum, Museumplein 6, 1071 DJ Amsterdam, Netherlands

Hockney - Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature

More Felled Trees on Woldgate

This is about perspective. In his landscapes, David Hockney, wants to challenge the ways people have learned to look at things. In the film which introduces ‘The Joy of Nature’, Hockney appears on-screen, a mixture of understated British chic and colourful Los Angeles ostentation, like a hipster Toby Jug. “In a way,” he muses, “Nature doesn’t really have perspective.” Review by Adam Heardman

Further reading +

BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Digital Citizen - The Precarious Subject

Citizen Ex, Part of Digital Citizen, The Precarious Subject, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead

The technological revolution was meant to liberate us, but it has flooded society with endless torrents of information, cataracts of algorithms and a deluge of uncertainty. James Bridle has written fervent polemics warning us of our perilous fate should we not develop a new “systemic literacy” to navigate these unknown waters. Responding to his call, ‘Digital Citizen’ unites the work of ten artists to inspire conversations on citizenship, democracy, identity and reality in a digital world. Review by Christopher Little

Further reading +

Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

Raqs Media Collective, Not Yet At Ease, 2018. Modular padded structure with fabric ceiling, padded stools. Six videos displayed on four monitors and two projections, six channel audio. Dimensions variable.

‘Spinal’, Raqs Media Collective's exhibition at Frith Street Gallery, features the installation ‘Not Yet At Ease’. It reflects on the mental state created by the discomfort and exploitation of First World War soldiers of Asian heritage. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +

Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

We are the people. Who are you?

Funda Gul Ozcan, It Happened as Expected, 2018, Four channel video installation, looping, Dimensions variable

A timely exhibition, ‘We are the people. Who are you?’ is an insightful essay representing current anxieties over the health of our electoral democracy. The 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall is looming and as well as reflecting the unpredictable consequences of that historical moment for artists from the former Soviet bloc the show connects the ‘revolution’ of 1989 with the turning point of 2016’s US election and other historical pivots. Review by Piers Masterson

Further reading +

25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Cécile B. Evans: AMOS’ WORLD

Cecile B. Evans, AMOS' WORLD, Tramway (2019).

‘AMOS’ WORLD’ is a highly staged, three-part, telepathic and narcissistic TV soap opera, strewn with the vernacular of a therapy session and the persuasive mantras of the executive suite, the property developer and the city planner. Review by Alex Hetherington

Further reading +

Cooper Gallery, 13 Perth Rd, Dundee DD1 4HT

Phil Collins: Ceremony

Phil Collins, Ceremony, 2018. Installation view Cooper Gallery, Dundee, 2019.

Visual artist and filmmaker Phil Collins’ journalistic video essay ‘Ceremony’ (2018) is structured as a complex melding of transnational road movie, rumination on the (in)visibility of public monuments, archival political portrait and ideological time/image/ machine. Review by Alex Hetherington

Further reading +

MO Museum, Pylimo g. 17, Vilnius 01141, Lithuania

All Art Is About Us

Installation view, All Art is About Us exhibition, MO Museum, Vilnius.

The inaugural exhibition, ‘All Art is About Us’, is made up predominantly of painting, video installation and photography from the museum’s collection of Lithuanian art. Review by Gulnaz Can

Further reading +

The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Rachel Maclean: The Lion and The Unicorn

The Lion and The Unicorn, Rachel Maclean, 2012

Maclean’s video work was created in the frenzied build up to the Scottish referendum, and sees the lion and unicorn from the Royal Coat of Arms personified by the artist in outrageously lurid get-up, lampooning the ridiculous regalia of power. Review by Clare Robson

Further reading +

The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

Further reading +

Workplace, The Old Post Office, 19-21 West Street Gateshead, Tyne & Wear NE8 1AD

Emily Hesse: The Taste of this History: A Church in my Mouth

Emily Hesse The, Shedding: The Glass Ceiling, 2018, Collage on found photograph, 43.25 x 57.5 x 3 cm

Hesse’s questioning of her own proximity to the notional centre of the art is illustrated by the circle drawn on the gallery floor that the pin hangs above - is she inside or outside the circuit of acceptance? The artist can be heard reading from her book ‘Black Birds Born from Invisible Stars’ which details touchingly her frequently disenchanting encounters with art institutions. Review by Piers Masterson

Further reading +

Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 Duke Street, St James's, London SW1Y 6BN

Amie Siegel: Backstory

The Noon Complex, 2016, three-channel HD video installation, colour/sound, edition 2 of 5 + 2AP

Amie Siegel’s exhibition ‘Backstory’ at London’s Thomas Dane Gallery opens with an unassuming series of works on paper. ‘Body Scripts’ (2015) consists of framed pages from a novel by Italian novelist Alberto Moravia that was the inspiration for Jean-Luc Godard’s classic film ‘Contempt’ (1963). Using only pages that feature the female protagonist, the artist uses sea-blue paint to erase phrases and sentences that don’t directly refer to the character. The result is an architectural geometry that flows from frame to frame and creates a visual context for the actions of the protagonist. Review by Anna Souter

Further reading +