Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Kiasma, Mannerheiminaukio 2, 00100 Helsinki, Finland

Liisa Lounila: Shadow Zone

7BPM

There’s a stillness in Liisa Lounila’s moving image works that inspires an urge to slow-down, to sit-down and to stay put, for a while. ‘Shadow Zone’, a collection of Lounila’s works from 2008 to 2020, challenges the viewer to observe the slight nuances in a seemingly repetitive world. Though spanning over a decade, the pieces selected remain relevant today; reflecting on broad themes such as the environment and consumerism, while providing a space in which to reinvigorate our relationship with the screen and digital media. Review by Selina Oakes

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover Street, London W1S 4NJ

Hito Steyerl and Harun Farocki: Life Captured Still

Harun Farocki Installation view, Harun Farocki & Hito Steyerl, Life Captured Still, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, London

For those who might ask why her work resonated so thoroughly with the generation just before her, the 'Life Captured Still' exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac may offer some answers. A selection of Hito Steyerl’s work was shown alongside a major influence on her life and work; the late filmmaker and video artist Harun Farocki. This exploration of the connections between these two prominent German filmmakers and visual artists was the first major posthumous exhibition of Harun Farocki’s work in the UK and, remarkably, the first exhibition to put their work in conversation together. Review by Chris Hayes

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Holt/Smithson Foundation (online)

Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson: Friday Film Programme

Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson shooting film at the site of Smithson's earthwork Broken Circle/Spiral Hill, Emmen, The Netherlands (1971)

Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson are two key figures in earth, land, and conceptual art, pioneering some of the most influential site-specific installations and video work in the 20th century. As many galleries and museums are continuing to find new digital means of presenting their programme, the Holt/Smithson Foundation launched a weekly film programme of both artists’ most iconic films alongside lesser known works with each available for just 24 hours. Throughout the series we see each artist in a new light, framed around the early experimental energy of video art as they explore artistic collaboration and themes of presence and absence against the backdrop of their monumental earthworks. Review by Aileen Dowling

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Galerie Lelong & Co. and P·P·O·W (online)

Irrigation Veins: Ana Mendieta and Carolee Schneemann, Selected Works 1966-1983

Proposed by Carolee Schneemann in the last year of her life, ‘Irrigation Veins: Ana Mendieta & Carolee Schneemann, Selected Works 1966 – 1983’ is a compelling exhibition of two canonical artists who sought to explore their embodied relationship to the land and its history through the body as material. Considering their inclusions in influential essays by Lucy Lippard and Gloria Feman Orenstein, as well as exhibitions at A.I.R. Gallery, the first artist-run gallery for women artists in the United States, it is remarkable that Mendieta and Schneemann have never been placed in direct dialogue. Review by Aileen Dowling

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Cao Fei: Blueprints

Cao Fei, Nova, 2019, Video

On the wall of a lobby, against a deep red velvet backdrop, a prophetic message welcomes the visitor: ‘In our splendid universe, motion pictures mirror our reality’. In Cao Fei’s ‘Blueprints’, different worlds merge and flip. Combining theatrical sets, photography, moving images, and her first VR work, the artist traces patterns of reality, teleporting visitors through distant territories and histories. Focusing on the district of Jiuxianqiao in Beijing, where the first Chinese computer was invented, the exhibition offers local perspectives of contemporary technological developments in China, mapping feelings that resonate globally. Review by Giulia Civardi

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External Pages

Legacy Russell: BLACK MEME

BLACK MEME, video on website, Legacy Russell, External Pages - externalpages.org

You are browsing the internet at different speeds, across temporalities. You take a deep dive in the realm of ‘BLACK MEME’, encountering material you are surrounded by every day. A journey curated by Legacy Russell. Review by Clara Nissim

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Danielle Arnaud Gallery, 123 Kennington Rd, Prince's, London SE11 6SF

David Cotterrell | Mirror III: Horizon

David Cotterrell, Mirror III Horizon, 2016, 2 Channel HD Projection, Custom Morse Code Generators and iOs App, duration: 10 mins 06 secs, HD video, Made in collaboration with Ruwanthie de Chickera.

‘Mirror III: Horizon’ is part of a broader’ project series’ created by London-based artist David Cotterrell in collaboration with Ruwanthie de Chikera. ‘Mirror III: Horizon’ is part of the six-week online programme curated by Tess Charnley of Danielle Arnaud Gallery, titled ‘Mis(sing) Communication. ‘Mirror III: Horizon’ is profoundly complex, evident in both the making of the project and also throughout the thematic intersections the work addresses. These intersections relate to anxiety and empathy, feelings brought forth by the inherent fear of isolation, risk and the unknown. All this is set against the context of the ongoing global refugee crisis. Review by Sheena Carrington

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Glasgow International 2020: Digital Programme

In Vitro (all the love mix)

The COVID-19 pandemic has cleared the cultural calendar for the foreseeable future and Glasgow International, Scotland’s largest festival of contemporary art, has been postponed until 2021. Indeed, the cancellation of a festival which was planned to span 60 exhibitions and 120 artists will be a disappointment to artists and the public alike. The digital programme is the unintended consequence of this unforeseen event. Review by Hailey Maxwell

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

Among the Trees

Jennifer Steinkamp, Blind Eye, 1, 2018, at Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery, 2020

Historically in western art, trees have generally been depicted as ornamental afterthoughts, their upright forms used to frame a scene or add definition to a landscape. ‘Among the Trees’ at Hayward Gallery, however, puts trees centre-stage, emphasising images where branches and leaves fill the frame, confusing the eye and defying the human scale of the viewfinder or canvas. Review by Anna Souter

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Villa Romana, Via Senese, 68 50124 Florence, Italy

Lerato Shadi: MOSI KE O NE …

Lerato Shadi, MOSI KE O NE ... 2018, video still

The artist, Lerato Shadi, is a South African, Berlin-based artist. ‘MOSI KE O NE’ begins with Shadi walking through a labyrinth of trees in the Italian countryside. Shadi is poised, dressed in all white, and the camera never reveals her face. She moves effortlessly, and her calm demeanour invites the viewer to follow her—the landscape of Shadi's work functions as a compelling narrative. ‘MOSI KE O NE’ is filmed outside of the traditional white-cube gallery setting. The landscape demonstrates how our bodies intrinsically connect to the earth. Review by Sheena Carrington

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Kadist, Paris, 19bis/21 rue des Trois Frères, 75018, France and Kadist, 3295 20th Street CA 94110, San Francisco, USA

AP: Assembled Personalities

Alex Da Corte, 'Slow Grafitti', 2017 (still). Courtesy of the artist, KADIST collection.

The computer screen: the only gallery left open during lockdown. We’re glued to laptops and their infinite possibilities – but they also have a few obvious limitations. So how do galleries render art that is both authentic and innovative in this paradox? Showing films are at the front of the queue – we can choose to pause, re-watch, fast-forward at our own pace, which we can’t do in a gallery. ‘AP: Assembled Personalities’ for gallery Kadist, is an online exhibition of film that, as the title suggests, addresses the identities of five artists: Guy Ben-Ner, Keren Cytter, Alex Da Corte, Mark Leckey, and Li Ran. Review by Ted Targett

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Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Masculinities: Liberation through Photography

Masculinities: Liberation through Photography, Installation view, Barbican Art Gallery

‘Masculinities: Liberation through Photography’ at the Barbican Centre is a masterful, comprehensive exhibition that outlines a sweeping artistic history that is probing, insightful and moving. Exploring how masculinity has been coded, performed, and socially constructed from the 1960s to the present day, this is a show of 50 international artists working through the medium of film and photography. Working across themes from queer identity, female perceptions of men, hypermasculine stereotypes, many of the participants don't sit easily within a gender binary, and rarely is the story told without an overlap to class, racism and the Western gaze; this is masculinity at its fullest. Review by Chris Hayes

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Grand Union, 19 Minerva Works, Fazeley Street, Birmingham B5 5RS

Jamie Crewe: Love & Solidarity

Love & Solidarity: Jamie Crewe, Grand Union 2020.

The term ‘community’ conjures images of disparate individuals joined by shared interests, experiences, cultures, or religion. But the term also groups unquestioningly, disregarding an acknowledgement that frictions can - and do - exist. Jamie Crewe’s ‘Love & Solidarity’ at Grand Union, Birmingham, the sister exhibition of ‘Solidarity & Love’ at Humber Street Gallery, Hull, offers a conflictual understanding of kinship, and parameters for queer love and disdain. Review by Ryan Kearney

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Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

HYPERSURFACE

Installation view, HYPERSURFACE, Austrian Cultural Forum

‘HYPERSURFACE’ at the Austrian Cultural Forum, curated by Caterina Avataneo and Nicole Tatschl, explores the possibilities of making and seeing within relations of complex surfaces and artistic practice. Featuring mostly Austrian artists and a range of mediums including painting, sculpture, text and animation, the show treats surface not as an end but as an active means to accessing various layers of substance and interpretation. Review by Sonja Teszler

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