Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Scotland Pavilion, Chiesa di Santa Caterina, Fondamenta Santa Caterina, 30121, Cannaregio

Venice Biennale 2017: Rachel Maclean: Spite Your Face

Installation view, Rachel Maclean, Spite Your Face, 2017.

The large portrait format screen in place of the altar of the deconsecrated church creates an ambience of a religious service and the audience are made to sit in pews. Maclean's previous work has taken Old Testament stories retelling them as contemporary fables that poked fun at cults and fads. 'Spite Your Face' presents the story of Pinocchio – one of those children's tales that having only known from the cleaned up Disney version is far darker than I assumed. Review by Piers Masterson

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

CONGLOMERATE: Station ID

CONGLOMERATE, Still from Desde el Jardin, directed by Sol Calero and Dafna Maimon, 2016.

An elaborate installation is the ‘absurdly complicated’ stage-set for the newest piece of ‘Gesamkunstwerk’ by Berlin-based artist collective CONGLOMERATE, presented at Tenderpixel as their first London-based project. The group comprises a core squadron of 5 artists and filmmakers including Sol Calero, Ethan Hayes-Chute, Derek Howard, Christopher Kline and Dafna Maimon, converging and disbanding at will in different cities and contexts in order to produce 30-minute ‘Blocks’ of programming that make a mess of traditional genres. Review by Alice Bucknell

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Estonia Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, San Samuele Square, San Marco 3199, 2nd floor, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2017: Katja Novitskova: If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes

Katja Novitskova, If Only You Could See What I've Seen with Your Eyes, exhibition view at the Estonian Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, 57th Venice Bienniale

Outside the entrance of the Estonian Pavilion in the 57th Venice Biennale, the phrase ‘If only you could see what I’ve seen with your eyes’ is printed on a poster in glowing red type. Katja Novitskova’s exhibition title originates from the 1982 post-apocalyptic film ‘Blade Runner’ and points toward several themes that run throughout the exhibition. Review by Ashley Janke

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David Roberts Art Foundation, Symes Mews, London NW1 7JE

Curators’ Series #10. Greater than the Sum by Kunsthalle Lissabon

Laure Prouvost, GDM future franchise, 2017 (details)

What role can the artist take in society? What path forward can a curator hope to illuminate? These are questions at the heart of the Kunsthalle Lissabon's programme, the Portuguese art institution that is currently exhibiting as part of DRAF’s Curator’s Series – only the second time an institution rather than an individual has been invited. In ‘Greater than the Sum,’ the two curators from the Kunsthalle Lissabon have taken full advantage of this rare privilege. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Vienna Secession Friedrichstraße 12, 1010 Vienna

Alex Da Corte

Alex Da Corte, Slow Graffiti, installation view

For his first major solo exhibition in Europe, Alex Da Corte has created a new work for the Vienna Secession.

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ALMA ZEVI, Salizzada San Samuele, 3357, 30124 Venice, Italy

John Smith: Films in Sheep’s Clothing

John Smith, Films in Sheep's Clothing, Om, 1986, ALMA ZEVI, 2017

In an increasingly earnest art world, visitors to Alma Zevi’s gallery off the main sway of the Grand Canal can take relief in the comedic value of mistranslation and mistaken identity. John Smith’s films - showcased for the first time in Italy in Zevi’s solo exhibition – are arranged into an artful, tightly curated presentation, and span Smith’s forty-year involvement at the frontline of British conceptual film-making. Review by Olivia Paterson

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Hales Gallery, Tea Building, 7 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA

Carolee Schneemann: More Wrong Things

Carolee Schneemann, More Wrong Things, 2017, Hales London

Recently awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Carolee Schneemann is best known for her innovations in feminist and performance art. Yet Schneemann’s decades-spanning multimedia practice has also consistently questioned the personal and cultural politics of violence and mourning, which the eloquent recent works in the exhibition continue to examine. Review by Carlos Kong

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The Kitchen, 512 W 19th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

That I am reading backwards and into for a purpose, to go on

Installation view, That I am reading backwards and into for a purpose, to go on, The Kitchen

Initially I see and hear numerous bodies on screen; speaking, gesturing, rolling, walking, running, returning and repeating. But the space I inhabit, is absent of any consciously performing bodies. This exhibition is not ‘of’ performance, rather it invites thought on how performance and the performer can be positioned to challenge current inequality, oppression and false-truths. Cicely Farrer reviews

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Staging Series

SIREN, 2017. Louisa Martin. Co-choreographed with and performed by Masumi Saito.

The third event, Louisa Martin’s ‘Siren’ (2017), combined orchestrated sounds, light interventions and an energetic dance co-choreographed and performed by Masumi Saito. The final instalment of the programme, ‘Rushes, Sketches and Schemes’, could not have been more different. Christian Nyampeta presented a live audio-visual session, featuring excerpts and rushes from an ongoing project called ‘Our Common Ghost’ (2015 - present), exploring themes of community, identity and erasure. Henry Broome reviews

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Grand Union, Minerva Works, 158 Fazeley St, Birmingham B5 5RS

Seecum Cheung: The Dutch Window

Seecum Cheung, The Dutch Window, 2017.

In a time when saboteurs lurk at home and gossips snipe from afar, some reach for the shutters and draw them fast. Better to be kept in the dark, it’s presumed, than to risk the prying of the ill-intentioned. Britain pulls down the blinds. The Channel has rarely felt wider. Kit Webb reviews Seecum Cheung's 'The Dutch Window'.

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AirSpace Gallery, 4 Broad Street, City Centre, Stoke-on-Trent ST1 4HL

Victoria Lucas: Lay of the Land (and other such myths)

Victoria Lucas, Lay of the Land (and other such myths), installation view at AirSpace Gallery

The spectral colours of ‘Psychedelic Western #3’ (2015) provide a rich exhibition excerpt – its vibrant and effervescent depictions of the Alabama hills are repeated in the show's wall-sized prints and theatrical screens. A feminine sigh welcomes you into the space, while deceptively light boulders – made from layers of polystyrene, fibreglass and jesmonite – catch your eye as they glisten under the gallery's spotlights. Selina Oakes reviews

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZx

Maeve Brennan: The Drift

Maeve Brennan, The Drift, 2017. Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2017.

From the very first images you are transported into rural Lebanon. The silence of the valley is broken by an incoming car, driving past a junction littered with disused motor vehicles. These modern ruins are instantly followed by ancient villas and temples that have sat for centuries in the countryside, now surrounded by roads, pylons and infrastructure. Review by Bobby Jewell

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Furtherfield Gallery, The McKenzie Pavilion, Harringay, London N4 2NQ

PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.

Refugee Flag, Installation view at Furtherfield Gallery, 2017

‘PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.’ announces itself with a song and a flag. Yara Said’s ‘Refugee Nation’ flag, designed in lifejacket orange for stateless participants of the 2016 Olympics, floats over the small pavilion in Finsbury Park housing Furtherfield Gallery. Review by David Morris

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