Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

narrative projects, 110 New Cavendish Street, Fitzrovia, London W1W 6XR

Rachel Lowe: SPLIT

Rachel Lowe, Split, 2020, 4 channel video projection, sound

Eighty black and white slides, created from found photographs of assorted different women, are projected chronologically so as to suggest the life of one individual woman. Having removed the central section, where the female subject should be, from each photograph, the re-assembled images now possess a vertical seam running down their centres. The physical incision enacted upon the images does not remove the woman's presence entirely, leaving the fictional "Elizabeth" of the title, somehow present and absent at the same time. Find out more about Rachel Lowe: SPLIT at narrative projects.

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BALTIC, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings

Amalia Pica, Yerkish, 2018. Courtesy the artist and Herald Street Gallery. Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art 2019.

The curator of the show, Filipa Ramos, says that the starting point is Deleuze’s text 'Becoming-Animal', but it goes beyond the theory. Deleuze, while writing about Francis Bacon, states that between human and animal, there is a deep identity, a zone of indiscernibility, that is more profound than any sentimental identification. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave, Seattle, WA 98104, USA

Agnieszka Polska: Love Bite

What the Sun Has Seen (still)

What if the sun spoke back to the world? Agnieszka Polska’s videos ‘The New Sun’ and ‘What the Sun Has Seen’ (both 2017) conjure this ecological encounter at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle, exhibited for the first time in the U.S. in the exhibition ‘Love Bite’ and curated by Amanda Donnan. Review by Laurel V. McLaughlin

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15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival, TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and other venues

Myths Of the Near Future

Ann Lislegaard, Installation View ENTANGLEMENT, TEA Tenerife

‘Myths of the Near Future’ was the chosen theme and title of the 15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival directed by Laura Vallés and held at TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and various other art venues in the Canary Islands. From the outset, the ambition was to reach out beyond the confines of photography in order to rethink the theory of the image and its limits, the places where it rubs up against other disciplines of knowledge like philosophy, sociology and anthropology. Review by Néstor Delgado Morales

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

Sung Tieu: In Cold Print

Recruitment Agreements Between Nations, 2015. Subnational Enterprise installation view at Dong Xuan Center, Berlin, 16 May - 13 June, 2015.

Sung Tieu’s new show at Nottingham Contemporary, ‘In Cold Print’ brings to light the physiological aspects of Cold War ideologies by re-contextualizing them in modern day warfare, looking at ideas of weaponry as silent, ghostly or in some way intangible. Review by Lucy Holt

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Jerwood Arts,171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/Photoworks Awards

Silvia Rosi, Jerwood/Photoworks Awards 2020 supported by Jerwood Arts and Photoworks. Installation view at Jerwood Space, London.

The Jerwood/Photoworks Awards is a significant opportunity for an early career artist to develop their work over the course of a year with the benefit of financial support and a program of mentoring. The 2020 winners are Silvia Rosi and Theo Simpson and their commissioned work is currently on view at Jerwood Arts. The award boasts its effort to encourage artists who engage with photography in an experimental way. Review by Katie McCain

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Southard Reid, 7 Royalty Mews, London W1D 3AS

Prem Sahib: Descent II. Cul-de-Sac

Prem Sahib, Archive, 2019, wood, painted steel, acrylic, archival material belonging to Kamaljit Sahib.

Sheena Carrington reviews the second of a three part exhibition by Prem Sahib titled 'Descent', a project with an overarching narrative that explores socio-political architectures and acts of resistance.

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Various locations, Singapore

Singapore Bienniale

Dennis Tan, Many Waters to Cross, 2019.

The beautiful vistas of rivers conjure a fantasy of a communal globalised world. As we watch the swirling river waters, the narration recalls that the Mekong became a dividing line of partition, as family members risked their lives to cross the river to escape to Thailand from the communist regime change of 1975. Piers Masterson reviews the Singapore Biennale, reflecting on highlights from this large, multi-sited and politically charged display.

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

Tai Shani: Tragodía

Tai Shani, Tragodia, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. Photograph by Kasia Kaminska

Blue is the first thing that greets you at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. An inviting blue covers the gallery’s exterior windows, providing privacy to those inside. Beyond the blue, as it does on the visible spectrum of light, lies violet. This warm shade of lavender wraps itself around the internal walls and dominates the gallery floor via a large and continuous sculpture in the same hue. Beyond violet on the visible spectrum lies ultraviolet, the invisible, the mystical. In Tai Shani’s ‘Tragodía’ this movement through colour is represented by a virtual reality play which requires special eyewear to view. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Ikon, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

ZouZou Group: – door open –

ZouZou Group, St Petersberg Station, still from – door open –, 2019

‘– door open –’ (2014-2019) is a new video artwork of a long standing and ongoing dialogue between two artists, one in Damascus, the other based in England. Toward the end of the twenty-five minute video the English voice-over talks through the technical difficulties the artists encountered over the course of the project. For the safety of the Syrian artist their communications were carried through the ether “by proxy”. Review by Betsy Porritt

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Focal Point Gallery, Elmer Ave, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1NB

David Blandy: The World After

The World After, David Blandy, 2019, installation view.

How many times can the world end? If the current abundance of post-apocalyptic fiction is anything to go by, too many times. Coming out of this crowded field of contemporary art and popular culture is David Blandy’s exhibition ‘The World After’ at Focal Point Gallery, Southend-on-Sea. The show takes as its subject Canvey Wick on Canvey Island, Essex, the site of a partially built oil refinery that was abandoned after the oil crisis in 1973. A case study in regeneration, the Wick is now a 93.2 hectare nature reserve, and one of the most important areas in Britain for endangered invertebrates. For over a year, Blandy has worked with local gaming communities in Southend to write a fictional future for this site, resulting in a film, an installation and a Dungeons and Dragons-esque role-playing game. Review by Kirsty White

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Frans Hals Museum, Groot Heiligland 62; Haarlem, Netherlands

Marianna Simnett: My Broken Animal

The Needle and the Larynx (video still)

I must treat everything as a given. As such, it seems necessary to accept that Marianna Simnett’s exhibition at the Frans Hals Museum feels like two distinct shows packaged into one on purpose. In taking this rupture seriously, the question would then be, why? What does the two-in-one form do here? With the first body comprised of two works from 2016 and the second of four from 2019, a separation along the lines of the chronological is a start. Review by Isabelle Sully

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David Zwirner, 24 Grafton Street, London W1S 4EZ

Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand

Installation views of Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand at David Zwirner London, 22 November 2019 - 19 December 2019.

David Zwirner recently featured ‘The Anchor Hits the Sand’, a solo exhibition by Swedish artist Jockum Nordström. Upon entrance, visitors encounter a collection of Nordström’s watercolour collages. The motifs that comprise the works illustrate Nordström’s imaginative spirit and oeuvre. Each composition is peculiar and ambiguous, characterised by various scenes, with figures who seemingly have no apparent relation to one another. Review by Sheena Carrington

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The Sunday Painter, 117-119 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1XA

Chips and Egg

Milly Thompson, Nor playing the flute, 2015, Oil and acrylic on board, 61 × 51 cm

‘Chips and Egg’ quotes a classic piece of British cinema,’ Shirley Valentine’. The film tells the story of a Liverpool housewife breaking out of her world of domestic cliché to embark on a spontaneous Greek holiday and find love and adventure only to end up in another set of clichés. This is precisely the self-digesting system of cultural production that’s light-heartedly recognised by this exhibition. The success of ‘Chips and Egg’ lies in highlighting the beauty and sincerity in seemingly futile repetition for the sake of care, survival, indulgence and art. Review by Sonja Teszler

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