Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

The Bower 'Ladies', Unit 1, Brunswick Park, Camberwell, London, SE5 7RH

Frances Scott: Diviner

Diviner

Made from seemingly hours painstakingly trawling through the South West Film and Television Archive based in Plymouth, Frances Scott’s exquisite film work, ‘Diviner’, marks the inaugural outing for newly opened exhibition and event space, The Bower. We are presented with an opulent 23 minute-long work which uses the short documentary, ‘Diviner Water in Luppitt’ (1976), as a locus for a broader sociological investigation. As a diviner might predict the future or locate water, Scott’s acute dexterity to hone the archive both realises and relinquishes the agency within; here her ability to re-appropriate the past negotiates a space for the present day to find shelter. Review by Sophie Risner

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Tramway, 25 Albert Dr, Glasgow G41 2PE

Laida Lertxundi: WORDS, PLANETS

 WORDS, PLANETS (still)

In a discussion about his work the late Chilean experimental filmmaker, Raúl Ruíz, said that his ‘films would have to be seen many times, like objects in the house, like a painting…’, that ‘landscape is used as a story’ and that he sought to draw upon ‘connections between film, installation, writing, theatre’ that in his extensive body of works, including the theoretical text ‘Poetics of Cinema’, made between 1963 and 2010, could be described as a nesting of stories, residing within each other, and of stories co-existing; of narratives, often fragmented and elliptical, and their layering together. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Josh Lilley Gallery, 44 – 46 Riding House St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 7EX

Brian Bress: Another Fine Mess

Brian Bress: Another Fine Mess installation view

Brian Bress has long been casting characters, almost always himself in costume, into videos carefully composed with subtle pathos. In these, the modes have grown more sophisticated with focus on the narrow confines of portraiture of tightly framed figures, their goofy attitude streamlined into more elegant displays with the scale of each character’s body relative to our own. Review by Alex Bennett

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Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Abandoibarra Etorb., 2, 48009 Bilbo, Bizkaia, Spain

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World installation view, 2018

What becomes apparent in the latter stages of the exhibition is a sense that many of the exhibition’s themes collapse into one another. 2008 is painted as a pivotal moment where the Beijing Olympics act as an affirmation of China’s ascent to global power, yet the Sichuan earthquake happened only a month before. Review by Stanley Portus

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Cabinet Gallery, 132 Tyers St, Lambeth, London SE11 5HS

Ed Atkins: Olde Food

Ed Atkins Installation view, Olde Food, Cabinet, London, 22 April - 2 June 2018

Olde Food has a surface but no nourishing inner content; credits to a film are shown that never started nor did it ever have a core narrative or story; a soaked and constantly crying man looks for sympathy from the viewer, without the capacity to learn there is none forthcoming. Review by Matthew Turner

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IMT Gallery, 2, 210 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9NQ

Maggie Roberts: Glimmer Breach

Maggie Roberts: Glimmer Breach Installation view

Roberts is tapping into the current zeitgeist around post-human or extra-human forms of intelligence via specific texts, fauna and digital tools. Whilst there are many artists working with and around these now, along with Roberts, it is her method of ‘fictioning’ and the open-ended, discursive nature of her work that elevates her current exhibition, Glimmer Breach, at IMT Gallery. Review by Lauren Velvick

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Transfer Gallery, 1030 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life

Rhonda Holberton: Still Life installation view

Contrary to the exhibition’s title, which suggests a state of stasis, Holberton’s work oscillates between analogue and digital, animate and inanimate, in order to destablise the notion of these binaries, and explore the possibility of a third space. Review by Grace Storey

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Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Charlemont House, Parnell Square North, Dublin 1, D01 F2X9, Ireland

Amanda Dunsmore: Keeper

Amanda Dunsmore, John Hume, 2005; installation view, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

In light of seismic political events, and the failed attempts to square the circle that is the Irish Border, Amanda Dunsmore’s exhibition ‘Keeper’ in Dublin’s Hugh Lane seems increasingly vital and brings the Good Friday Agreement into sharper focus. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstraße 7, 10963 Berlin

Covered in Time and History: The Films of Ana Mendieta

Sweating Blood

Ana Mendieta remains a significant artistic figure of the 1970s and 1980s because of her radical practice encompassing performance, gender and geo-political identity. The extensive self-documentation of her performances (which were often enacted alone) on primarily Super 8 film has allowed for her works to survive to this day. Review by Joan Lee

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT

Mario Merz, 2002 by Tacita Dean. 16mm colour film, optical sound, 8 minutes, 30 seconds. Film still.

The glance, with its speed and lack of resolution, is probably the defining characteristic of contemporary vision. We see people with the same lack of depth, quickly skimming across their seemingly shallow surfaces. The experience of viewing Tacita Dean’s ‘PORTRAIT’ at the National Portrait Gallery, on the other hand, is more like the process of reading than the ways in which we usually contemplate visual art; the whole show seems to provide a slow, even still, contemplative corrective to the incessant pace of modern life. Review by Matthew Turner

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences

15 days by Imran Perretta as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences exhibition at Jerwood Space until 3 June

This year’s Jerwood/FVU Awards sees Maeve Brennan and Imran Perretta engage with the theme of ‘Unintended Consequences’ by considering, in very different ways, the complex nexus of vision, knowledge and representation. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Sondra Perry: Typhoon coming on

Sondra Perry, Installation view, Typhoon coming on, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London, 6 March - 20 May 2018

‘Typhoon coming on’ is the first solo presentation of Sondra Perry’s work in Europe. For those unfamiliar with the artist, one may find themselves swimming against the purple ocean waves projected across the gallery walls in search of Sondra – in search of healing that feeling of uncertainty in an art gallery, amplified by the disorientating, dizzying, environment we’ve found ourselves trying to navigate. Review by Cairo Clarke

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Kader Attia: The Field of Emotion

Kader Attia: The Field of Emotion. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2018

Amid the celebrations of Canada’s 150th birthday last year, there prevailed an anxiety surrounding its colonial origins, and the efforts to reconcile past and continuing mistreatment of its indigenous groups with its modern national identity. It’s within this context that French artist Kader Attia stages his first major exhibition in the country, Fields of Emotion at the Power Plant, Toronto. Presenting a series of works dealing with political and individual traumas, Attia traces a thread of genealogies and histories which offset sanitized narratives and explores the lingering impact of atrocities left unaddressed or disavowed. Review by Alec Kerr

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Cubitt, 8 Angel Mews, London N1 9HH

Hardeep Pandhal: Liar Hydrant

Hardeep Pandhal, Liar Hydrant Mood Board detail, Cubitt Gallery, 2018.

The video works layer lurid cartoons, psychedelic narratives and deadpan rap music; they are accompanied by production drawings and a sculpture. Edmée Lepercq reviews Hardeep Pandhal's solo exhibition at Cubitt.

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