Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZx

Maeve Brennan: The Drift

Maeve Brennan, The Drift, 2017. Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2017.

From the very first images you are transported into rural Lebanon. The silence of the valley is broken by an incoming car, driving past a junction littered with disused motor vehicles. These modern ruins are instantly followed by ancient villas and temples that have sat for centuries in the countryside, now surrounded by roads, pylons and infrastructure. Review by Bobby Jewell

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Furtherfield Gallery, The McKenzie Pavilion, Harringay, London N4 2NQ

PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.

Refugee Flag, Installation view at Furtherfield Gallery, 2017

‘PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.’ announces itself with a song and a flag. Yara Said’s ‘Refugee Nation’ flag, designed in lifejacket orange for stateless participants of the 2016 Olympics, floats over the small pavilion in Finsbury Park housing Furtherfield Gallery. Review by David Morris

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Castor, Enclave 8, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Jack West: Time and Attendance

Jack West: Time and Attendance, Castor

The videos exist in a digital purgatory with nothing around them apart from pixels and hyperbolic colour palettes emulating materials we know. Review by William Davie

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

A World View: John Latham

A World View, John Latham, Speak, 1962, Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London, 1 March 2017 - 21 May 2017

Neither chronological nor particularly thematic, the show’s organisation drives home one of the main characteristics of Latham’s work: to a greater or lesser extent all of it reflects his peculiar and esoteric theories of universal time, and his theory of art as event. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Luxembourg & Dayan, 2 Savile Row, Mayfair, London W1S 3PA

The Ends of Collage: London

Installation view, The Ends of Collage, Luxembourg & Dayan, London, 10 March - 13 May 2017

While on one count, the show’s conception of collage is flawed, it presents a complete and compelling account of its connection to other mediums. Review by Henry Broome

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Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Whitney Biennial 2017

Installation Occupy Museums,  Debtfair, 2017  ( 2017 Whitney Biennial, March 17—June 11, 2017).  Thirty artworks and interactive website.  Whitney Museum of American Art

The 78th instalment of the Whitney Biennial for 2017 - which always aims for the zeitgeist and the seminal - opens at a time of crisis not only in the United States, but around the world. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

David Ferrando Giraut: The Accursed Stare

David Ferrando Giraut, CATOPTROPHILIA, 2013. Installation view.

David Ferrando Giraut’s recent works weave a neon path through progressive economic theories and 17,000 years of image-making, arriving at the present day clad in Louboutin and dripping in gold. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Richard Mosse: Incoming

Still frame from Incoming, 2015-2016. Three screen video installation by Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost.

In ‘Incoming’, the other is played by the European state apparatus. In their helmets, suits and protective gear, those that meet and interact with the refugees are rendered alien in the thermographic camera’s aesthetic. Mosse’s camera is able to present the true inhumanity of the crisis by inverting the roles of the migrant and those enforcing the violent borders. Review by David Lee Astley

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Auto Italia, 44 Bonner Rd, London E2 9JS

Feral Kin

Feral Kin, Auto Italia South East (2017). Installation detail (left to right): Billy Howard Price, Taut Pupil (2017). Digital print. Jaakko Pallasvuo, MASK (2016) written by Huw Lemmey & Jaakko Pallasvuo. Single channel video.

‘Feral Kin’ is London’s first glimpse into Auto Italia’s collaborative, ongoing project ‘On Coping’. From Johannesburg to Copenhagen, Auto Italia has brought ‘On Coping’ across the world. Working locally with artists in each city, the project seeks to unpack the artist precariat by developing systems of growth through collaboration. Review by Ashley Janke

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SE8 Gallery, 171 Deptford High Street, London SE8 3NU

João Biscainho: Future Nothingness

Rock Interior (2012-2014) and Uncanny River (the Crossing) (2014-2015)

In ‘Future Nothingness’ material and materiality are merged together by Portuguese artist João Biscainho in a well-choreographed display. The exhibition presents a series of works from 2013 – 2015 that take us into a series of marine references, using fluids as the main vehicle to transport the meaning of the works in the semi-dark space of the gallery. Review by Cristina Ramos González

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Decad, Gneisenaustraße 52, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Christopher Petit: In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone

Christopher Petit: In What's Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone, installation view at Decad, 201

Novelist and filmmaker Christopher Petit presents ‘In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone’. Using a pixelated image of the late David Bowie as a stimulus, the four works presented are an examination of a quiet voyeurism that speaks to internal, often inexpressible observations surrounding popular, repetitive images. Review by Candice Nembhard

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