Viewing articles tagged with 'Digital'

PM/AM, 50 Golborne Road, London W10 5PR

06

‘06’ is a both an online and physical exhibition, envisioned by the gallery PM/AM, as “a collective status check, a unique opportunity for self-assessment” that came together after the gallery set up a discussion between several artists, offering a form of exchange to collectively examine how the pandemic was impacting their daily lives. But rather than positioning the exhibition as a response to Covid-19, the discussions became a mediation on this new collective moment of re-evaluation.

Further reading +

HEISTart.com

HEIST

‘HEIST’ is one of a kind: a show about ‘stolen’ artworks presented in a hacker chatroom. The exhibition adopted the conventions of a face-to-face exhibition via a live browser-based chatroom, giving the audience the opportunity to mingle and chat with the artists. This sense of connectivity, of participation, was further conveyed by the disruption (through deletion and addition) of text as participants variously joined or left the virtual event. But then again, glitches are part of the game. Review by Dan Commons and Rina Arya

Further reading +

Online

Hotel Happiness

Hotel Happiness, Lobby, Installation View

We are going through a time when our movement is limited and the notion of hospitality has a very different meaning; our bodies are playing host to a virus, while we are unable to host or be hosted in domestic spaces. Experiencing a virtual hotel that hosts artworks and artists as its guests does something powerful. I realise I haven’t thought about these temporary homes in a long time. And ‘Hotel Happiness’ provides this hospitable space—despite the limitations of the digital sphere. Review by Deniz Kırkalı

Further reading +

Online

Plicnik Space Initiative

Plicnik Space Initiative

The Plicnik Space Initiative, a new artistic venture founded by Amelie Mckee and Melle Nieling, hosts its inaugural exhibition aboard the D02.2, a fictional spacecraft of massive proportions, with a mission to explore the boundary between physical and virtual space. As museums and galleries across the globe face uncertain futures in the wake of the pandemic, the show interrogates the parameters of digital curation, inviting imaginative responses to a range of pressing questions concerning art and the environment, technology, and commerce. Review by Rowland Bagnall

Further reading +

Camden Art Centre, Arkwright Rd, London NW3 6DG

The Botanical Mind Online

O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix (screen 1)

‘The Botanical Mind: Art, Mysticism and The Cosmic Tree’ was originally intended to be an in-house group exhibition at Camden Art Centre. Instead, the spread of COVID-19 and the closure of public gallery spaces saw the show move to the digital realm and become ‘The Botanical Mind Online’. The exhibition is hosted at botanicalmind.online, which serves as both the main space to read about the themes and topics of the show, and the central repository for a number of digital offerings, from videos, sound recordings, and podcasts to texts. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

John Hansard Gallery, 142-144 Above Bar St, Southampton SO14 7DU

David Blandy: How to Fly | How to Live

David Blandy, How to Fly

The current Covid-19 pandemic has thrown the art world into a fight for relevancy that, as galleries and museums have had to close their doors, reveals the limits of their techie expertise. Many face new challenges, but the technophilic, literate, and adept are of course out there. David Blandy is one such case, and two new video works by Blandy, commissioned by John Hansard Gallery, reflect on the current crisis. Review by Stan Portus

Further reading +

Keep Showing Club, Neopangea, Budapest, Hungary

Neopangean Nest

Installation view, Neopangean Nest, Keep Showing Club

It’s the year 3000 in the great southern forest of Neopangea, where animal-machine-human hybrids form a graceful community. The earth’s population is now at approx. 1 billion, due to multiple waves of pandemics starting in the 2020s. Sonja Teszler responds to an innovative virtual exhibition that takes place in a forest setting in Budapest.

Further reading +

FACT, 88 Wood St, Liverpool, L1 4DQ

you feel me_

Why Can't We Do This IRL_, installation view at FACT

‘you feel me_’ opened on 31st October 2019―a fitting day on which to interrogate all things systemic and speculative. For one thing it was Halloween, and for another, it was the day on which the UK had been billed to leave the European Union. The press material for FACT’s new group show knowingly invites its viewers to “feel the future and imagine a world without division”, and interrogate power structures both literal and more abstract. Review by Lucy Holt

Further reading +

Pool of Plenty, Galerie de l’UQAM
Judith-Jasmin Pavilion, Room J-R120 1400 Berri Street, Montréal

Pool of Plenty: Michelle Bui

Beadgame

Pool of Plenty is an exhibition that brings together photographic work that transcends the decorative and ornamental language of advertising in a détournement that makes use of touch and smell to surpass mere visual spectacle. In this solo show, the artist engages with a rediscovery of objects, materials, food items and plants that make our environment.

Further reading +

Bonington Building, Nottingham Trent University, Dryden St, Nottingham NG1 4GG, UK

Sara MacKillop: One Room Living

One Room Living, installation view

One Room Living presents a series of works and interactions that reference the wide variety of spatial uses that directly surround Bonington Gallery – analysing not only the gallery’s site and situation, but also how the wider institution’s function is represented across a multitude of spaces.

Further reading +

Division Gallery, 45 Ernest Ave, Toronto, ON M6P 3M7

Nicolas Baier: Asterisms

Vanité (bureau astro)

Division Gallery is pleased to announce Asterisms, an exhibition of new works by acclaimed Quebec artist Nicolas Baier. His past work consisted of a self-reflexive examination of the camera’s possibilities, focusing on the medium’s transformation in the digital age. Baier’s experimentation compelled us to pay attention to the perspectival changes engendered by photography: how the technology alters both the Real and our direct reality.

Further reading +

Simon Lee Gallery, 12 Berkeley Street, London, W1J 8DT

Jeff Elrod

Installation view

At a time when the slippages between our own real and virtual, Jeff Elrod exhibits a series of hybrid images that incorporate analogue techniques into experiments in digital and print media, and explore the relationship between hand-painted and digitally created mark-making.

Further reading +

NEW STUDIO, 4-17 Frederick Terrace, London, E8 4EW

Wendy Plovmand: Wet Paint

Wet Paint, Installation View

For her new solo show 'Wet Paint', Danish artist Wendy Plovmand takes the gallery space itself as her source material, transforming architectural photographs and found images into digital abstractions.

Further reading +