Decad, Gneisenaustraße 52, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Christopher Petit: In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone

Christopher Petit: In What's Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone, installation view at Decad, 201

Novelist and filmmaker Christopher Petit presents ‘In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone’. Using a pixelated image of the late David Bowie as a stimulus, the four works presented are an examination of a quiet voyeurism that speaks to internal, often inexpressible observations surrounding popular, repetitive images. Review by Candice Nembhard

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ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

As the main player in a game of shifting dynamics of authority, Boyce enables a fairly unpredictable performative situation but avoids direct involvement in the action. Later on, the artist reshapes the remains of the past event, so to create an installation that aims to become a space for new experience. Review by Chiara Cartuccia

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Bonner Kunstverein and Artothek, Hochstadenring 22 D-53119 Bonn, Germany

Amanda Ross-Ho

Amanda Ross-Ho, installation view, Bonner Kunstverein, 2017. Photo: Mareike Tocher

Bonner Kunstverein presents a new solo exhibition by L.A. based artist Amanda Ross-Ho. Working primarily as a sculptor, Amanda Ross-Ho uses a diverse range of materials and techniques from traditional handicrafts to 3D printing. Within her exhibitions banal, everyday objects from her domestic or studio environment are translated and transformed with dramatic effect.

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Centrala, Unit 4 Minerva Works, 158 Fazeley Street, Birmingham B5 5RT

SEVENTEEN

Olga Grotova, One (2016)

The centenary of the Russian Revolution is being celebrated in various exhibitions and cultural events this year. ‘Seventeen’ at Centrala more obliquely explores what a centenary of such significance might mean through the work of three UK-based Russian artists, Olga Grotova, Yelena Popova and Nika Neelova. Review by Jessie Bond

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Wysing Arts Centre, Fox Road, Bourn, Cambridge, CB23 2TX

All Channels Open

Lawrence Lek, FABRICK, 2017. Two video loops, 12 min, Stereo sound, Architectural model, Lasercut MDF, HD Screens, Raspberry Pis, LED Strip. 65 x 25 x 15 cm.

‘All Channels Open’ is similar to a compilation played within a subdued, minimally lit dance floor. An imaginable mic is passed to each artist in an effort to amplify her or his voice and position in the space. Review by Jaime Marie Davis

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Jamie Crewe: Female Executioner

Jamie Crewe, Female Executioner, 2017. Installation view.

‘Female Executioner’ translates the 1884 work, ‘Monsieur Venus: A Materialist Novel’, into compact visual sequences theatrically staged across the sparse Gasworks gallery. Review by Ashley Janke

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Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1S 1BP

Tim Noble and Sue Webster: STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS

Tim Noble and Sue Webster, STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS, 2017, Installation view

Their exaggerated expressions, dishevelled hair and naked bodies rendered with a cartoonish aesthetic make an adequate mockery of the Mayfair surroundings. The artists are seemingly running riot in their white cube play-pen. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Frith Street Gallery, Soho Square (60 Frith Street), London

Adrian Paci / Giuliana Racco: Another Place

The Guardians

Informed by Adrian Paci's personal history of exile from Albania to Milan in 1997 during an armed uprising, he is characteristically drawn to dislocating the viewer and exploring the ambiguities of space, and the intersection between fact, fiction, reality and fantasy. His work has found a suitable counterpart in Giuliana Racco. Review by Cleo Roberts

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The Third Line, Warehouse 78 & 80, Street 8, Al Quoz 1, Alserkal Avenue Dubai, UAE

Sophia Al-Maria: EVERYTHING MUST GO

Sophia Al-Maria EVERYTHING MUST GO, installation view at The Third Line, Dubai 2017. Courtesy the artist and The Third Line.

Sophia Al-Maria's exhibition at The Third Line creates an immersive experience, capturing the chaotic, almost apocalyptic act of consuming. The viewer is invited to experience illusions of order in underlying confusion and pandemonium.

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Lodos, Edificio Humboldt, 116 Calle del Artículo 123, Int. 301, Colonia Centro, Mexico City, Mexico

Kasia Fudakowski: Bad Basket

Kasia Fudakowski: Bad Basket, installation view at Lodos, 2017

‘Everything that is not a basket, is a bad basket’ exclaims Kasia Fudakowski in her solo show at Lodos Gallery in Mexico City. Craft, and its valuation, is at the centre of this show, as Berlin-based Fudakowski archly comments on appropriation, market value and the definition of artistic labour. Review by Henry Osman

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham, NG7 6BE

UNTITLED: art on the conditions of our time

UNTITLED: art on the conditions of our time, installation view at New Art Exchange, 2017

UNTITLED provides a number of guilty pleasures. Opening with Harold Offeh's video Covers Playlist (2016), in which a slightly over the hill man works on his disco diva moves, the show manages to maintain that identity politics can be playful as well as a serious subject. Review by Piers Masterson

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Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square, Bloomsbury, London WC1N 1AZ

Mark Neville: Child’s Play

Mark Neville, Arts and Crafts at Somerford Grove Adventure Playground, 2011

The Foundling Museum’s 'Child’s Play' by Mark Neville is a photography exhibition which inhabits that grey, often elusive space between contemporary art, documentary photography and political activism. The project aims to focus attention on attitudes towards play in the UK by bringing together a book, a symposium and this exhibition which presents images of children playing set against a number of vastly contrasting backdrops around the world. Review by Alexander Daniel

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