National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Michael Jackson: On the Wall

Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II (Michael Jackson)

The religious aspects of the exhibition are divided. Some works stand as testament to Jackson’s enigmatic international appeal. One room contains footage from the 1992 Dangerous world tour, revealing delirious crowds, a mass euphoria even outstripping Beatlemania: while the Fab Four played to 55,000 people at Shea Stadium in 1965, Jackson’s concert in Bucharest is estimated to have been attended by nearly 100,000. And the numbers don’t stop there: more than 1,000,000 fans are said to have congregated outside Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, while the televised spectacle itself is said to have been watched by more than 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. “We’re more popular than Jesus,” said Lennon of the Beatles in 1966. One wonders where this places Jackson. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court, Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

Hazel Brill: Shonisaurus Popularis

Hazel Brill: SHONISAURUS POPULARIS installation view

For an artist whose work often deals with fantasy and simulation, Las Vegas is an ideal subject for Brill, its evolution as a setting for desire, is a perfect mirror for her distinctive, cinematic and kaleidoscopic installations. Review by Piers Masterson

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CGP London, The Gallery by the Pool, 1 Park Approach, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA

The Everyday Political

The Everyday Political installation view 2018

As the exhibition attempts to showcase an emerging contemporary art scene in the North East, Lenihan and Meikle while critiquing the banal geographical rubric used by the current Great North Exhibition – this exhibition is not part of the official programme – the pair insightfully identify ‘restorative nostalgia’ and the appeal of the ‘off-modern’ as two subjects that fixate the cultural landscape of the region. Review by Piers Masterson

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Hayward Gallery, London

Lee Bul

Installation view of Lee Bul Via Negativa II 2014 at Hayward Gallery 2018  (interior detail) copyright Lee Bul 2018  Photo Linda Nylind

A few months ago, a group of scientists claimed the octopus might be an alien from outer space...

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Waldo 117 Dearborn Lane Rockport, ME 04856 USA

The Infinite Image

The Infinite Image, installation view

The Infinite Image is an exhibition that brings together five impressions made from Mesopotamian cylinder seals (c.3000- c.300 BCE) with five contemporary painters who use diverse strategies to resuscitate, reactivate, and recombine art-historical images and motifs.

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LADA

LADA Screens - Nicola Fornoni

Selected as part of the 2018 LADA Screens Open Call, “Overshoot Day” is a film shot in vast marble quarry, featuring artist Nicola Fornoni using his mouth to keep a glass with a drop of water in it raised in the air for an hour and a half.

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Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London, NW1 5DA

Mary Corse

Mary Corse, installation view, Lisson Gallery London, May 2018

Mary Corse’s first major UK show at Lisson Gallery, London, is as much a scientific inquiry as it is art. Newtonian science extracts emotion from the situations it is used to examine, the same, by extension, could be said of its strange alter ego quantum mechanics. Review by Matthew Turner

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Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art (Modern One), 75 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DR

Jenny Saville: Trace

JENNY SAVILLE  Olympia, 2013 - 2014  Charcoal and oil on canvas, 217 x 290 cm copyright Jenny Saville.  Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian

Jenny Saville’s paintings have always explored the insistence of corporeal mass, the fleshiness of flesh...

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves

Installation Image of Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves at Whitechapel Gallery

Entering Katja Novitskova’s ‘Invasion Curves’ at Whitechapel Gallery is like stepping into the set of a science fiction film. Metallic wires, flashing lights, giant eggs and a human brain occupy the gallery space. Surrounding this landscape, floating sheets of Perspex and resin hang from the ceiling and display phrases such as ‘the right to harvest resources’, ‘we are at an inflection point’, and the title ‘invasion curves’. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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