Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London, SE1 0LN

Jerwood Drawing Prize

Installation View – Barbara Walker, Exotic Detail in the Margin, 2017. Jerwood Drawing Prize 2017, supported by Jerwood Charitable Foundation.

This wide scope has been a cornerstone of the project since it was founded in 1994. The longest running and largest annual open exhibition for drawing in the UK, it has developed a reputation for celebrating the considerable diversity that exists within contemporary drawing practice. As the 2017 iteration shows, it is also a platform that highlights the value of drawing in both an artistic practice and within communities. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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The Koppel Project Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

The Hive Mind

The Hive Mind installation downstairs

‘The Hive Mind’ is a group exhibition consisting of sculpture, painting, video and print work by new and established artists, that probes the question of connectivity in an increasingly dysfunctional and meaningless reality. Review by Evie Ward

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Thomas Dane Gallery 3 Duke Street St James's London SW1Y 6BN

Naming Rights

Naming Rights at Thomas Dane Gallery 2017, Installation View

‘Naming Rights’ is a unique exhibition that discloses the arcane mechanisms of an artist run project space, converting the gallery into a place for artistic research and experimentation. The result is a distinctive presentation of works by international artists. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Dreamers Awake

Dreamers Awake, Installation view, 27 June - 17 September 2017

The bodies without eyes, without hands, fragmented and uncanny, as portrayed by the multiple generations of female artists presented in ‘Dreamers Awake’ hijack Surrealist tropes and techniques, and both reproduce and resist the voyeuristic gaze. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome

Installation view at the Whitechapel Gallery, Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome (7 June - 10 September 2017)

‘The Trickle-Down Syndrome’ is a large-scale installation, which consists of five interconnected yet individual rooms, inspired both by 1930s backdrops of Hollywood director Busby Berkeley and the Surrealist works of Max Ernst. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Bermondsey Square, London

Lucy Tomlins: Pylon and Pier

Lucy Tomlins, Pylon and Pier, 2017. SCULPTURE AT Bermondsey Square.

In between the glass-fronted perimeters of Bermondsey Square, on the tiled ground, stands an empty plinth. This robust hexagon, coated a light beige to match the innocuous colour scheme of the commercial properties, could well be a part of the developer’s vision. It is sympathetic to the clusters of metal octadecahedron inevitably installed to add interest and dynamism to an otherwise anaesthetised square. Cleo Roberts reviews.

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Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London, SE5 7RW

Eva Gold: A Bead of Sweat, Stilled

Drawing on a broad framework of cinematic references, for her upcoming exhibition at Lily Brooke, Eva Gold presents an installation comprising several individual sculptures. Situated within a broader exploration of filmic spaces, Gold here extends her analysis of the cinematic landscape as memory site.

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Trajal Harrell: Hoochie Koochie, A performance exhibition

The Return of La Argentina, Trajal Harrell: Hoochie Koochie, A performance exhibition, Barbican Art Gallery, London

Enter into the Barbican’s gallery space, and an audience is huddled around a trio of young male dancers in loose, draped clothing, shuffling on tiptoe and making gentle reaching arm movements. Evie Ward reviews Trajal Harrell: Hoochie Koochie, A performance exhibition.

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Chewday's, 139 Lambeth Walk, London, SE11 3EE

Bryan Dooley: Public Death

Bryan Dooley, NP, 2016 [detail]

Public Death is the theatrical result of Bryan Dooley's research into dormant patents, currently owned by Google, designed to move data farms out to sea. Dooley’s installation plays on themes of circulation, cultural signification, technological progress, and inevitable disaster.

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ

Yuri Pattison: user, space

Yuri Pattison, user, space (2016). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2016. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Courtesy of the artist; mother's tankstation limited, Dublin; Helga Maria Klosterfelde, Berlin; and Labor, Mexico.

A long table surrounded by Ikea-style chairs runs through the centre of the gallery, while in one corner, a separate environment for relaxing houses oversized cushions and shelves of plants. And everywhere, there is the physical manifestation of tech: wires, adapters, servers, computers, and cameras, creating a cacophony of noise that hums throughout the installation. Review by William Rees

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Victoria Miro Mayfair, 14 St George Street, London W1S 1FE

Kara Walker: Go to Hell or Atlanta, Whichever Comes First

 Go to Hell or Atlanta, Whichever Comes First, Installation view

The facelessness interrupts personal empathy, forcing the viewer to observe from a distance. There is no possibility for intervention, we are powerless and we have failed. Benjamin Murphy responds to Kara Walker's current exhibition at Victoria Miro Mayfair.

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Barbican, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop

 Eddie Peake: The Forever Loop 9 October 2015 - 10 January 2016

The spine of the exhibition is ‘Revolution’ - a 30-minute video displayed on five monitors throughout the gallery and accompanied by a live choreographed performance. This mash up of dancers in a studio performing strong, synchronised choreography, Kool FM DJs jamming to Drum & Bass and Peake family home videos dictates the throbbing, erratic rhythm that permeates the space. Review by Alex Borkowski

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Carlos/Ishikawa, Unit 4, 88 Mile End Road, London, E1 4UN

Richard Sides: Invisible World

Invisible World, Installation View

The lighting, music and layout are such key parts of Richard Sides' work that 'Invisible World' is an exhibition to experience rather than see. João Abbott-Gribben reviews Sides' solo show at Carlos/Ishikawa gallery in London.

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Michael Dean: Sic Glyphs

Michael Dean, Sic Glyphs, installation view at the South London Gallery, 2016

Whether affixed to other structures or lolling on the floor, Dean's oversized, weighty and flaccid things convey the muscular effort of communication, pushing forward an idea of language as material process and bodily struggle. They return, heaped on the floor, in ‘Sic Glyphs’, an exhibition of new work by Dean currently on display in the South London Gallery, an exhibition for which the artist has been nominated for the Turner Prize. Luke Naessens reviews

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