Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London, NW1 5DA

Mary Corse

Mary Corse, installation view, Lisson Gallery London, May 2018

Mary Corse’s first major UK show at Lisson Gallery, London, is as much a scientific inquiry as it is art. Newtonian science extracts emotion from the situations it is used to examine, the same, by extension, could be said of its strange alter ego quantum mechanics. Review by Matthew Turner

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves

Installation Image of Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves at Whitechapel Gallery

Entering Katja Novitskova’s ‘Invasion Curves’ at Whitechapel Gallery is like stepping into the set of a science fiction film. Metallic wires, flashing lights, giant eggs and a human brain occupy the gallery space. Surrounding this landscape, floating sheets of Perspex and resin hang from the ceiling and display phrases such as ‘the right to harvest resources’, ‘we are at an inflection point’, and the title ‘invasion curves’. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Mother's Tankstation, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Maria Farrar: Eaves Deep

Dresser

Though it appears brittle, the Greyhound is strong and quick, its structure contradicts its force. Similarly with Maria Farrar’s paintings, lines become not just convenient structure, but a directional thing-in-itself. Review by Alex Bennett

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The Bower 'Ladies', Unit 1, Brunswick Park, Camberwell, London, SE5 7RH

Frances Scott: Diviner

Diviner

Made from seemingly hours painstakingly trawling through the South West Film and Television Archive based in Plymouth, Frances Scott’s exquisite film work, ‘Diviner’, marks the inaugural outing for newly opened exhibition and event space, The Bower. We are presented with an opulent 23 minute-long work which uses the short documentary, ‘Diviner Water in Luppitt’ (1976), as a locus for a broader sociological investigation. As a diviner might predict the future or locate water, Scott’s acute dexterity to hone the archive both realises and relinquishes the agency within; here her ability to re-appropriate the past negotiates a space for the present day to find shelter. Review by Sophie Risner

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National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire, and Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire

The Course of Empire: The Savage State

Looking at some of Cole’s earliest American landscape paintings, made after his move to New York from Philadelphia in 1825, the contrast is arresting. The Edenic quality of his scenery is hard to miss. There’s a quiet stillness to paintings like ‘View of the Round-Top in the Catskill Mountains’ (1827), in which the landscapes seem both fresh and undisturbed; not only are they new to Cole – and “new to Art”, as he writes in his journal – but they seem somehow newly created, as if the painting’s mists were rising from a just-finished topography. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Handel Street Projects, 14 Florence Street, London N1 2DX

Graham Gussin: The Mary Jane Paintings

Graham Gussin: The Mary Jane Paintings installation view

Graham Gussin’s The Mary Jane Paintings are illegal. They aren’t illegal in the same way that the art market is increasingly criminal, such as how the sale of da Vinci’s Salvador Mundi was called ‘the biggest art fraud in history’ or how works of art featured heavily in the Panama Papers as vehicles for tax evasion and other financial crimes. Instead, they are directly illegal; made from hashish that has been ground down, mixed with linseed oil and applied to linen and paper. Review by Matthew Turner

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Paul Maheke: A fire circle for a public hearing

Paul Maheke, A place you only go through (2018). Produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery and Vleeshal Center for Contemporary Art, Middelburg

When A Fire Circle For A Public Hearing opened at Chisenhale Gallery last April, it was quite frustrating to learn that Paul Maheke was not going to perform live for the whole duration of the exhibition. Despite being completely absent from the stage, Maheke’s body is still present through a video work that plays on a continuous loop. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

LOW BATT. installation view

LOW BATT. installation view

The exhibition’s text opens with a quote from the film Dawn of the Dead, where a group of survivors find refuge from the zombie apocalypse in a shopping mall. The exhibition seeks to problematize our reliance on technology and looks for alternative forms of survival, asking ‘What tools might expedite shopping mall survivalism?’ For Turf projects, who are being evicted from this space at the Whitgift at the end of the year to make way for a shiny new Westfield, the question of survival has never been more urgent. Review by Amy Jones

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Josh Lilley Gallery, 44 – 46 Riding House St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 7EX

Brian Bress: Another Fine Mess

Brian Bress: Another Fine Mess installation view

Brian Bress has long been casting characters, almost always himself in costume, into videos carefully composed with subtle pathos. In these, the modes have grown more sophisticated with focus on the narrow confines of portraiture of tightly framed figures, their goofy attitude streamlined into more elegant displays with the scale of each character’s body relative to our own. Review by Alex Bennett

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Hayward Gallery, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, London SE1 8XX

Adapt to Survive: Notes from the Future

Adapt to Survive: Notes from the Future

Adapt to Survive: Notes from the Future is a title that would be as at home on a book by Ayn Rand as the group exhibition currently at the Hayward Gallery. Brought together by Senior Curator Dr. Cliff Lauson, the show contains seven works which each explore potential trajectories from the present. If there is a guiding thread, it is less in the fullness of its visions, than the way it challenges an inability to create alternative futures.

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Cabinet Gallery, 132 Tyers St, Lambeth, London SE11 5HS

Ed Atkins: Olde Food

Ed Atkins Installation view, Olde Food, Cabinet, London, 22 April - 2 June 2018

Olde Food has a surface but no nourishing inner content; credits to a film are shown that never started nor did it ever have a core narrative or story; a soaked and constantly crying man looks for sympathy from the viewer, without the capacity to learn there is none forthcoming. Review by Matthew Turner

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IMT Gallery, 2, 210 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9NQ

Maggie Roberts: Glimmer Breach

Maggie Roberts: Glimmer Breach Installation view

Roberts is tapping into the current zeitgeist around post-human or extra-human forms of intelligence via specific texts, fauna and digital tools. Whilst there are many artists working with and around these now, along with Roberts, it is her method of ‘fictioning’ and the open-ended, discursive nature of her work that elevates her current exhibition, Glimmer Breach, at IMT Gallery. Review by Lauren Velvick

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Edel Assanti, 74A Newman St, Fitzrovia, London W1T 3DB

Noémie Goudal: Telluris

Noemie Goudal: Telluris installation view

Noémie Goudal’s photographs are full of unsettled contradiction. The product of constructions, they lie between truth and fiction, the ancient and the new, managing to be both unified and fragmented, existing in a state of instability. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Banner Repeater, Hackney Downs Network Rail, Platform 1 Dalston Ln, London E8 1LA

De-Leb

De-Leb at Banner Repeater installation view

The exhibition presents a set of possible borders, or more precisely, gives us a kit of instruments to delineate the fitful, slippery and serpentine edges of technology so we can keep control of the data hidden within the substrata of our bodies. The show is more of a virus than an art exhibition, one that sets out to disrupt the control systems that invisibly ensnare us all. Review by Matthew Turner

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