Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Large Glass, 392 Caledonian Road, London N1 1DN

Alice Channer: A Coin in Nine Hands - Part 5

Crustacean Satellites, 2018. Vacuum Metallised Spider Crab (Maja Brachydactyla) and Brown Crab (Cancer Pagurus) Shells on Stainless Steel Jigs; PVC Coated Steel Cables; Fixings, 295.5 (h/variable) x 105 (w) x 110 (d) cm

'A Coin in Nine Hands - Part 5: Alice Channer (Carapaces)’ is a fascinating celebration of the elaborate figure of a shell. Inspired by Marguerite Yourcenar’s novel ‘A Coin in Nine Hands’ (1993), which recounts the journey of a ten lira coin through the hands of nine different people – a prostitute, an artist and Mussolini’s assassin – this exhibition is part of the gallery’s ambitious project of displaying the work of nine international artists in nine different solo shows over the coming months. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT

Mario Merz, 2002 by Tacita Dean. 16mm colour film, optical sound, 8 minutes, 30 seconds. Film still.

The glance, with its speed and lack of resolution, is probably the defining characteristic of contemporary vision. We see people with the same lack of depth, quickly skimming across their seemingly shallow surfaces. The experience of viewing Tacita Dean’s ‘PORTRAIT’ at the National Portrait Gallery, on the other hand, is more like the process of reading than the ways in which we usually contemplate visual art; the whole show seems to provide a slow, even still, contemplative corrective to the incessant pace of modern life. Review by Matthew Turner

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Alan Cristea Gallery, 43 Pall Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5JG

Christiane Baumgartner: Liquid Light

Christiane baumgartner liquid light installation view

Light, so yielding it lies beyond our sense of touch, leaves its trace by an absence: expanses of white are produced by what has been cut away from the imprinting block. Review by Kevin Brazil

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences

15 days by Imran Perretta as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences exhibition at Jerwood Space until 3 June

This year’s Jerwood/FVU Awards sees Maeve Brennan and Imran Perretta engage with the theme of ‘Unintended Consequences’ by considering, in very different ways, the complex nexus of vision, knowledge and representation. Review by Anya Smirnova

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FOLD Gallery, 158 New Cavendish St, London W1W 6YW

Thomas Bang: States of discontinuity: New and recent work

Thomas Bang, Sign (Flying Yellow Flags for Elena and Nicholae) 2018, Plywood, textiles, leather, gesso, acrylic paint, 165 x 204 x 94 cm

Dominant in Thomas Bang’s exhibition of recent work at FOLD, where eight sculptures as upright as paintings are pinned to the walls, is a concern with how sculpture relates to its supports. In fixing all the works to the gallery walls he questions the distinction between those two most traditional of media: painting and sculpture. Review by Samuel Glanville

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Sondra Perry: Typhoon coming on

Sondra Perry, Installation view, Typhoon coming on, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London, 6 March - 20 May 2018

‘Typhoon coming on’ is the first solo presentation of Sondra Perry’s work in Europe. For those unfamiliar with the artist, one may find themselves swimming against the purple ocean waves projected across the gallery walls in search of Sondra – in search of healing that feeling of uncertainty in an art gallery, amplified by the disorientating, dizzying, environment we’ve found ourselves trying to navigate. Review by Cairo Clarke

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Modern Art, 50-58 Vyner Street, London E2 9DQ

Eva Rothschild: Iceberg Hits

Eva Rothschild, Iceberg Hits, exhibition view, Modern Art, Vyner Street, London, 22 March - 5 May 2018

Rothschild's sculptures tantalise us with scripted hints while continually resisting meaning. Clues across titles make it tempting to consider the passion, rejection and sensuality of human relationships as much as how sculptures might relate to one another and to us. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Lilah Fowler: nth nature

Lilah Fowler: nth nature, 2018

The city is striated into manifold ordered grids that similarly control our movements. The Nevada desert on the other hand, one of the locations Lilah Fowler explored for her show at Assembly Point, has no such boundaries and borders – it has an order more in common with a modulating weather system than any Cartesian geometry. Review by Matthew Turner

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Hazel Brill

Hazel Brill, Woke Up in Spring, 2018, Mixed media video installation, 9 mins. Solo Invites exhibition, 1 March - 8 April 2018.

Hazel Brill’s new video installation ‘Woke Up in Spring’ presents a compendium of media and cultural references that build up a layered picaresque of the artist’s exploration of her environment. Review by Piers Masterson

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Maureen Paley, 21 Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Kaye Donachie: Silent As Glass

Kaye Donachie, Silent As Glass, exhibition view, Maureen Paley, London 2018

Over the course of her career, Donachie’s work has developed from group depictions of nymph-like youths in a variety of natural settings, including campfires and caves, and hinting at tribal undertones in warm earthy colours, to the caged, closely framed portraits of women in domestic surroundings, even if these are only suggested, we see today. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Pi Artworks, 55 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EG

Ipek Duben: in via incognita

Installation view: Ipek Duben, in via incognita, 2018.

“We were human beings once”; “Now he could start a new life”. These are two separate sentences from testimonials scrolling down on a large projection in Pi Artworks London’s back wall. The rest of the exhibition ‘in via incognita’ by Ipek Duben consists of what that semicolon represents: the in-between of having been human once and the possibility of starting a new life. Text by Gulnaz Can

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Imperial War Museum London, Lambeth Rd, London SE1 6HZ

Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11

Surveillance Camera with Plinth

The compulsion of artists to respond to certain events as they unfold, as exemplified by artists in Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11 at the Imperial War Museum, London, raises unavoidable questions concerning the relationship between aesthetics and morality. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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SCULPTURE AT/VITRINE Bermondsey Square

Charlie Godet Thomas: Cloud Study

Charlie Godet Thomas, Cloud Study, 2017. Commission for SCULPTURE AT Bermondsey Square, London.

Public sculpture usually dominates its surrounds; they are alien objects that often attempt to improve an area by shifting our focus away from it. Conversely, Charlie Godet Thomas’ ‘Cloud Study’, commissioned by SCULPTURE AT and located in Bermondsey Square, is a different species; it blends into the language of the street and manipulates it like a virus, deforming common visual cues and the messages they usually transmit. A sign, for example, is supposed to be read easily, but Thomas’ is ambiguous, and he tells us about our environment instead of distracting from it. Review by Matthew Turner

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Andreas Gursky

Installation image, Andreas Gursky at Hayward Gallery 25 January - 22 April 2018

Gursky captures the next step in the evolution of our sense of resolution, a way of seeing beyond increasing levels of detail, one which constantly flips back and fourth between the detail and the overview, perhaps imprinted in us as we zoom in and zoom out when using Google maps – in fractions of a second we can travel from our own home to the scale of the whole world and back again. Review by Matthew Turner

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