Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Simon Lee Gallery, 12 Berkeley Street, London W1J 8DT

Donna Huanca: Wet Slit

Donna Huanca: Wet Slit, Simon Lee Gallery London, installation view

Donna Huanca’s ‘Wet Slit’ at Simon Lee Gallery provides a bodily experience of her work. Like the ice sculpture encasing Klein blue hair, only present for the show’s inaugural weekend as it shed water to nothing, we are encased by the exhibition in its evolving sounds and smells, moving beyond the visual. The sound of water dripping and splashing, a glass occasionally smashing, plays on loop. Review by Tess Charnley

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Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, St James's, New Cross, London SE14 6AD

Transparent Things

Installation view of Transparent Things (2020), at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, London

It’s not uncommon for art or exhibitions to draw upon philosophical or literary sources for inspiration. The 56th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale in 2015 staged daily readings of Marx’s ‘Das Kapital’ (1867); the seed for Cally Spooner’s performance at the New Museum, New York in 2016 ‘On False Tears and Outsourcing’ was a scene from Flaubert’s ‘Madame Bovary’ (1856); and Tai Shani’s presentation at the 2019 Turner Prize was based on a 1405 text by poet Christine de Pizan. Review by Kirsty White

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narrative projects, 110 New Cavendish Street, Fitzrovia, London W1W 6XR

Rachel Lowe: SPLIT

Rachel Lowe, Split, 2020, 4 channel video projection, sound

Eighty black and white slides, created from found photographs of assorted different women, are projected chronologically so as to suggest the life of one individual woman. Having removed the central section, where the female subject should be, from each photograph, the re-assembled images now possess a vertical seam running down their centres. The physical incision enacted upon the images does not remove the woman's presence entirely, leaving the fictional "Elizabeth" of the title, somehow present and absent at the same time. Find out more about Rachel Lowe: SPLIT at narrative projects.

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ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Cameron Rowland: 3 & 4 Will. IV c.73

Caption information below

Cameron Rowland’s first solo exhibition in the UK, ‘3 & 4 Will. IV c.73’, uses the provenance of objects, language, and laws, to underscore the artist’s research into the afterlife of slavery. Making various references to cultural theorists such as Saudiya Hartman, the work supports the contention that the abolition of slavery was a nonevent. Review by Sarah Hughes

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Castor Projects, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Habitual

Installation view

Entering the gallery through the small front door, the audience is directed towards the exhibition through a segue into a seemingly empty, light grey space with a lonesome bench and a large wooden structure in the corner. At this point there is still no sign of any art in an exhibition of 19 artists. However, instead of a conventional commercial group exhibition, ‘Habitual’ unfolds within the theatrical setting of a compulsive collector’s storage solution. Review by Sonja Teszler

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Bosse & Baum, Unit BGC, Ground Floor, Bussey Building, 133 Rye Lane, SE15 4ST

Candida Powell-Williams: The Gates of Apophenia

Candida Powell-Williams, Gates of Apophenia, installation view, Bosse & Baum, 2019.

Candida Powell-Williams’ installation, at Bosse & Baum in South London, feels like a series of frustrated movements: you move into, through, and around; there are loops that fail to revolve. The show is based on the tarot, and these movements act as invocations to interpret, and to delve into the symbols at play. In the way of both movement and interpretation, the idea of resolution is repeatedly engaged and refused in kind. Review by Harriet Smith Hughes

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Dora Maar

Dora Maar at Tate Modern, 2019.

Tate Modern here highlights how vast, rich and varied Maar’s work was, over five decades, in striking curatorial choices. It powerfully repairs an injustice in the history of art. Moving chronologically from her first photographs to her experimental return to the dark room, the exhibition displays different phases of a sublime career, kick-started in an iconic place and time: Paris in the 1930s within the Surrealist movement. Review by Melissa Chemam

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Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Patrick Goddard: Trip to Eclipse

Patrick Goddard, Trip To Eclipse (2020), installation shot.

‘Trip To Eclipse’ is a new installation by Patrick Goddard, exhibited at Matt’s Gallery following his participation in the Blackrock Residency in 2016, a collaboration between the gallery and the Lydney Park Estate. The title is a reference to a 1990s clothing label, which was more popular amongst children and teens than the actual rave culture it proposed to represent. Think: bomber jackets and ultra-baggy jeans, graffiti and spliffs. Review by Chris Hayes

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Lauren Gault: C I T H R A

Lauren Gault, C I T H R A, 2020. Installation view. Commissioned by Gasworks.

Lauren Gault’s exhibition ‘C I T H R A’ at Gasworks, London, is a show of strange encounters. The installation continues the artist’s interest in the possibilities of materials, using ‘sculptural language as a connective tissue’ for her wider research. Review by Tess Charnley

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Live Art Development Agency, The Garrett Centre, 117 Mansford Street, London, E2 6LX

LADA Screens: selina bonelli

LADA presents a screening of (re)collecting (f)ears, a film documenting a number of performances by the artist selina bonelli. The event also features readings from (re)collecting (f)ears, a publication featuring artistic responses to the project, and a conversation between selina bonelli and Joseph Morgan Schofield (LADA).

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Jerwood Arts,171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/Photoworks Awards

Silvia Rosi, Jerwood/Photoworks Awards 2020 supported by Jerwood Arts and Photoworks. Installation view at Jerwood Space, London.

The Jerwood/Photoworks Awards is a significant opportunity for an early career artist to develop their work over the course of a year with the benefit of financial support and a program of mentoring. The 2020 winners are Silvia Rosi and Theo Simpson and their commissioned work is currently on view at Jerwood Arts. The award boasts its effort to encourage artists who engage with photography in an experimental way. Review by Katie McCain

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SPACE Ilford, 10 Oakfield Road, Ilford, IG1 1ZJ

Lindsey Mendick: Regrets, I’ve Had a Few

Lindsey Mendick: Regrets, I've Had A Few, 2019. Mixed media installation including: ceramics, paint and fabric.

Many of the works comprising Lindsey Mendick’s exhibition are the culmination of a series of ceramic workshops she led for Ilford-based over 65 year-olds, including over 70 ceramic sculptures – ranging from Dorothy Gale-style red stilettos and a bird bath, elaborately decorated vases and colourful crockery, fabric clad angel figurines and anthropomorphic animals at sail in a fictional sea – together with painted wall murals, fabric banners, and sculptural display structures. The show marks the grand opening of the new SPACE Studios in Ilford situated in the rear of the Town Hall. Review by Tyler Woolcott

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Southard Reid, 7 Royalty Mews, London W1D 3AS

Prem Sahib: Descent II. Cul-de-Sac

Prem Sahib, Archive, 2019, wood, painted steel, acrylic, archival material belonging to Kamaljit Sahib.

Sheena Carrington reviews the second of a three part exhibition by Prem Sahib titled 'Descent', a project with an overarching narrative that explores socio-political architectures and acts of resistance.

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Vivian Suter: Tintin’s Sofa

Vivian Suter, Tintin’s Sofa, installation view, Camden Arts Centre.

The dramatic arrangement of works suggests the organic and vegetal profusion of a complex living system such as a rainforest. This is a deliberate echo of the rainforests which surround Vivian Suter’s lakeside studio in Guatemala – a place that plays a fundamental role in the making and meaning of the artist’s work, and which leaves its physical traces on her paintings. Review by Anna Souter

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