Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Vivian Suter: Tintin’s Sofa

Vivian Suter, Tintin’s Sofa, installation view, Camden Arts Centre.

The dramatic arrangement of works suggests the organic and vegetal profusion of a complex living system such as a rainforest. This is a deliberate echo of the rainforests which surround Vivian Suter’s lakeside studio in Guatemala – a place that plays a fundamental role in the making and meaning of the artist’s work, and which leaves its physical traces on her paintings. Review by Anna Souter

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David Zwirner, 24 Grafton Street, London W1S 4EZ

Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand

Installation views of Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand at David Zwirner London, 22 November 2019 - 19 December 2019.

David Zwirner recently featured ‘The Anchor Hits the Sand’, a solo exhibition by Swedish artist Jockum Nordström. Upon entrance, visitors encounter a collection of Nordström’s watercolour collages. The motifs that comprise the works illustrate Nordström’s imaginative spirit and oeuvre. Each composition is peculiar and ambiguous, characterised by various scenes, with figures who seemingly have no apparent relation to one another. Review by Sheena Carrington

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V&A, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Tim Walker: Wonderful Things

V&A Tim Walker Wonderful Things Exhibition Installation View - 'Pen & Ink' Section

One corner of the V&A has been transformed into Wonderland. Tim Walker’s exhibition, ‘Wonderful Things’ houses a vast portfolio of his photography, ranging in style from sharp and stark portrayals of singular subjects to impossibly complex ethereal fantasies. Review by Zoe Ettinger

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover Street, London W1S 4NS

Matrescence

Matrescence, installation view, Richard Saltoun Gallery London.

The business of being a mother is a messy one. Richard Saltoun’s new exhibition is the first of two shows hosted by the London gallery to address the triumphant and tragic path of motherhood. The title ‘Matrescence’ (you’d be forgiven for drawing a blank) refers to an anthropological science developed by American doctor Dana Raphael in the 1970s, which discusses the process of becoming a mother – psychologically and physically speaking. For the uninitiated, it was also Dr Raphael who coined the term “doula”. Review by Claire Phillips

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Victoria Miro Gallery, 16 Wharf Road, London N1 7RW

Celia Paul

Installation view, Celia Paul, 13 November - December 2019.

“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.” These are the words that Jane Eyre uttered defiantly to Mr Rochester in Charlotte Brontë’s tale of love and woe. And like Brontë and her sisters, living in the restraints of their father’s parsonage, the British artist Celia Paul spent her youth surrounded by women in the Devonshire and Yorkshire countryside, where her father was the Bishop of Bradford. Review by Claire Phillips

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The Sunday Painter, 117-119 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1XA

Chips and Egg

Milly Thompson, Nor playing the flute, 2015, Oil and acrylic on board, 61 × 51 cm

‘Chips and Egg’ quotes a classic piece of British cinema,’ Shirley Valentine’. The film tells the story of a Liverpool housewife breaking out of her world of domestic cliché to embark on a spontaneous Greek holiday and find love and adventure only to end up in another set of clichés. This is precisely the self-digesting system of cultural production that’s light-heartedly recognised by this exhibition. The success of ‘Chips and Egg’ lies in highlighting the beauty and sincerity in seemingly futile repetition for the sake of care, survival, indulgence and art. Review by Sonja Teszler

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Jerwood Arts, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Collaborate!

 Keiken + George Jasper Stone, Feel My Metaverse, 2019

For ‘Jerwood Collaborate!’ Jerwood Arts commissioned four emerging and early career collectives and collaborative practitioners, Array, Languid Hands, Shy Bairns and Keiken + George Jasper Stone, enabling the groups to create new work and build on their existing practices. The variety in the practices exhibited demonstrate the different modes and outcomes of working together, encompassing everything from protest banners and marches, zine making and friendship quizzes and video and CGI work. Review by Emily Hale

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The Mosaic Rooms, Tower House, 226 Cromwell Road, London SW5 0SW

Praneet Soi: Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, Winter in the Kashmir Valley

Praneet Soi: Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, Winter in the Kashmir Valley, The Mosaic Rooms

The exhibition 'Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, winter in the Kashmir Valley’ resembles a travelling diary written by a flâneur-cum-researcher, into territories and histories familiar to the artist Praneet Soi. In response to The Mosaic Rooms commission, the artist decided to travel during June 2019 across the Occupied Palestinian Territories including Golan Heights, Jericho and Hebron, and in Israel, in Haifa, Akka and Tel Aviv. Review by Mihaela Varzari

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180 The Strand, London, WC2R 1EA

Transformer: A Rebirth of Wonder

Korakrit Arunanondchai, Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3, 2015

The space below 180 The Strand feels labyrinthine and immersive – shuffling through the exhibition, there is no real sense of where anything is in relation to anything else. The works occur sequentially, with no overlap between worlds and no deviation from this path. A varied approach to texture, sound, and scent add to the feeling of discrete worlds, as does the lighting, with rooms ranging from almost totally dark or U.V. for Chen’s photographs to the stark, blindingly white light as in Huanca’s installation, or the blue neon strip lighting that extends from the virtual reality of the screen into the space itself in Lek’s work. Review by Katie McCain

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Gagosian, 20 Grosvenor Hill, London W1K 3QD

Cy Twombly: Sculpture

Cy Twombly, Untitled (St. Sebastian), bronze, 1998

Cy Twombly’s sculptures are mostly created from materials such as wood, plaster, iron and other objects that might be found in an artist’s studio. Every piece is individually assembled displaying a sense of historic meaning. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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iMT Gallery, 210 Cambridge Heath Rd, Cambridge Heath, London E2 9NQ

Benedict Drew: Trapped in a sticky shed with side chain compression

Benedict Drew, Bad Ffffeeeeeellll, 2019, Digital print on vinyl, 150 x 150 cm

Drew’s current exhibition ‘Trapped In A Sticky Shed With Side Chain Compression’, at iMT Gallery is a combination of material mayhem that is crudely enigmatic. The message is hardly exact upon entrance. However, Drew’s constructed chaos is compelling once the viewer mentally submits to the stroboscopic anxiety that the exhibition elicits. Review by Sheena Carrington

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A.P.T, Harold Wharf 6 Creekside, Deptford, London SE8 4SG

The World Without Us

Andrew Leventis, Stafford Terrace House 1, 2019, oil on linen, 59 x 80 cm

The group painting exhibition ‘The World Without Us’ is based on the book by Professor Eugene Thacker at The New School, New York, called: ‘In the Dust of This Planet’. The nihilist book is a meditation on the meaning of life, or rather re-imagines a world where life has no purpose. A world plagued by catastrophe, suffering, threats of war and extinction — this isn’t a world of fairy-tales and happy endings but daily horrors created by man’s destructive nature and incessant consumption. Review by Sara Makari-Aghdam

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mother's tankstation London, 58 - 64 Three Colts Ln, Bethnal Green, London E2 6GP

Yuri Pattison: to-do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶

Yuri Pattison, installation view, to do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶, mother’s tankstation London, Chip Scale Atomic Clock promotional video (Super SloMo waifu2x rework), padlock nightlights

Layers of time, economic systems and environments tightly interconnect in Yuri Pattison’s new exhibition. ‘to-do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶’ explores the narratives embedded in time-based technologies and the very fabric of reality. A combination of existing and newly-made works shows the connection between seemingly unrelated worlds, by turning to the ineffable world of toxins, waves and frequencies. Review by Giulia Civardi

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