Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

iMT Gallery, 210 Cambridge Heath Rd, Cambridge Heath, London E2 9NQ

Benedict Drew: Trapped in a sticky shed with side chain compression

Installation view of Trapped in a sticky shed with side chain compression by Benedict Drew at iMT Gallery, London (2019)

Drew’s current exhibition ‘Trapped In A Sticky Shed With Side Chain Compression’, at Image Music Text is a combination of material mayhem that is crudely enigmatic. The message is hardly exact upon entrance. However, Drew’s constructed chaos is compelling once the viewer mentally submits to the stroboscopic anxiety that the exhibition elicits. Review by Sheena Carrington

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A.P.T, Harold Wharf 6 Creekside, Deptford, London SE8 4SG

The World Without Us

Andrew Leventis, Stafford Terrace House 1, 2019, oil on linen, 59 x 80 cm

The group painting exhibition ‘The World Without Us’ is based on the book by Professor Eugene Thacker at The New School, New York, called: ‘In the Dust of This Planet’. The nihilist book is a meditation on the meaning of life, or rather re-imagines a world where life has no purpose. A world plagued by catastrophe, suffering, threats of war and extinction — this isn’t a world of fairy-tales and happy endings but daily horrors created by man’s destructive nature and incessant consumption. Review by Sara Makari-Aghdam

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mother's tankstation London, 58 - 64 Three Colts Ln, Bethnal Green, London E2 6GP

Yuri Pattison: to-do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶

Yuri Pattison, installation view, to do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶, mother’s tankstation London, Chip Scale Atomic Clock promotional video (Super SloMo waifu2x rework), padlock nightlights

Layers of time, economic systems and environments tightly interconnect in Yuri Pattison’s new exhibition. ‘to-do, doing, d̶o̶n̶e̶’ explores the narratives embedded in time-based technologies and the very fabric of reality. A combination of existing and newly-made works shows the connection between seemingly unrelated worlds, by turning to the ineffable world of toxins, waves and frequencies. Review by Giulia Civardi

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Nam June Paik

TV Garden. 1974-1977 (2002) Single-channel video installation with live plants and colour television monitors

Early photographs of Paik at his studio in New York City show him smiling, like a kid in a sweet shop, in a room filled with clutter. The antique technology that blankets the floor arguably appears as rubbish to most. However, to Paik, broken-down technological devices were inspiration. Review by Sheena Carrington

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Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Susan Hiller: Ghost / TV

Susan Hiller, Ghost / TV, 2019, installation view.

At the time of Susan Hiller’s death earlier this year, she was working on a new show for Matt’s Gallery, the tiny Bermondsey gallery with which she had a decades-long working relationship. The resulting show has come about in collaboration with Hiller’s son, Gabriel Coxhead. Review by Lucy Holt

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Tintype, 107 Essex Rd, Canonbury, London N1 2SL

Michelle Williams Gamaker: Distant Relative

Still from THE ETERNAL RETURN, 2019, 17mins, HD Video, black and white, sound

In January 2018, Michelle Williams Gamaker travelled across the pond to Los Angeles, California and reached a new level of obsessive fandom. Dressed in a brown taffeta cocktail dress, Jackie O-style sunglasses and gold sparkly stilettos, she made the trek through the 300-acre Forest Lawn Memorial Park - ‘cemetery to the stars’ - to locate the grave of Indian-born, Hollywood studio era film star Sabu. Despite her efforts to connect with the star, for whom Williams Gamaker has a deep affinity, she was eventually discovered by security and ordered to leave, although not without first putting up a good fight. ‘... it’s just that I’m a distant relative,’ she protested. Review by Alex White

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PEER, 97 & 99 Hoxton Street, London N1 6QL

OUT OF SHAPE

Out of Shape at PEER – Kate Howard, Pop Pop Pop Pop, 2019 (foreground); Kate Howard, Hysterical Prosthetic, 2019 (background left); Greta Davies, Gothic Door, 2019 (right); Greta Davies Studio Window, 2019 (background right).

It is an important moment for PEER as it is enters its fourth year of collaborating with Acme – a career programme enabling young artists to establish themselves and their approaches towards their future profession. This year the exhibition consists of large installations by three women graduates from London based MA courses – Greta Davies, Kate Howard and Marylyn Molisso. Their work touches on notions of experience, temporality and embodiment, as it interweaves with the gallery spaces, as well as the physical presence of other objects. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Staging Series 2019

Onyeka Igwe,  the names have changed including my own and truths have been altered, 2019

This is the third year of Jerwood Staging Series, a curatorial project that creates events of work that includes film, installation, performance, and discussion. This year’s four artists are diverse in their interests and work: Onyeka Igwe, a London artist and filmmaker absorbed in the archive, place, and the body; Essex-based Rebecca Moss, whose work plays with slapstick and absurdism; multi-disciplinary artist and sculptor AJ Stockwell; and Birmingham-based curator and researcher Seán Elder. Harriet Smith Hughes reviews two of the Series’ events.

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l’étrangère, 44A Charlotte Rd, Shoredtich, London EC2A 3PD

Joanna Rajkowska: The Failure of Mankind

Joanna Rajkowska, The Failure of Mankind, installation view, l'etrangere

One of the highlights of this year’s Frieze Sculpture display in Regent’s Park is a giant egg. Titled ‘The Hatchling’, the large-scale sculpture by Polish artist Joanna Rajkowska is a replica of a blackbird’s egg, which emits the noises of a hatching bird: heartbeat, pecking, and attempts at vocalisation. Rajkowska’s current solo show at l’étrangère follows up on the themes of this piece under the bleak but apposite title ‘The Failure of Mankind’. Review by Anna Souter

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Kudzanai-Violet Hwami: (15,952km) via Trans-Sahara Hwy N1

Kudzanai-Violet Hwami, Family Portrait, 2017 acrylic and oil on canvas 2 panels.

Each painting is thought of as an overlap of narratives, stories and representations of black bodies in many forms. In so doing, Hwami is addressing her ideas and ideals of her own family and her roots, as well as the legacies of colonialism. Review by Melissa Chemam

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Myvillages: Setting the Table: Village Politics

Farmers & Ranchers, Deer Trail USA, 2013

Myvillages, the collective behind ‘Setting the Table: Village Politics’, was set up in 2003 by Kathrin Böhm, Wapke Feenstra, and Antje Schiffers. On their website the group give an indicative statement about the exhibition: it seeks, they write, to ‘equip the gallery as a space from where to access our and your own interest and knowledge about the rural’. Review by Harriet Smith Hughes

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ICA,The Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5AH

I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker

Installation view of I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker at ICA, London, 2019

Kathy Acker was a plagiarist, a pirate, an emblem of postmodernism, a fascinating and complicated person, but most importantly, she was a writer. A literary exhibition is a challenging project, and so fuelled by a desire to see what curatorial decisions would locate writing visually, I went to see ‘I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker’ at the ICA - surely if any writer can sustain an exhibition it would be Acker. Review by Katie McCain

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold, Installation view, 6 June - 8 September 2019, Serpentine Galleries

As I walk through the Serpentine Gallery’s retrospective of her 50-year career I can’t get Faith Ringgold, the person, out of my mind. The works on display, despite many of them depicting horrific scenes of physical and social violence; the riots that took place during the civil rights era of 1950s and 60s America; gender inequality; the Black Power movement and the manipulation of black bodies in white consumer-capitalist culture, are permeated with the same warmth and affirmative energy that emanates from the artist in her interviews. This is an unusual brand of ‘political’ art; the works are critical, incisive and defiant, yet the tone remains warm and positive, even joyful - much like the artist herself. Review by India Nielsen

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Makers Open

Mark Corfield-Moore, Celestial Meteors, 2019 (left); Nitrous Flame, 2019 (middle) and Golden Showers, 2019 (right). Dyed Warp, handwoven cotton in oak frame.

The work in this year’s Jerwood Makers Open is undoubtedly beautiful and desirable. But it also resists quick consumption. Investigations into traditional craft processes, social anxieties and climate change all appear in this meditation on making. Review by Bernard Hay

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