Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Parasol unit, 14 Wharf Rd, Hoxton, London N1 7RW

Heidi Bucher

Heidi Bucher, installation view at Parasol unit, London, 2018.

Wood panelled rooms with French windows, parquet flooring, linen duvets and night gowns embroidered with edelweiss. What is on display at Parasol unit are not the surfaces themselves but their skins, cast in latex by the Swiss artist Heidi Bucher whose importance has been increasingly recognised since a posthumous retrospective at the Migros Museum in Zurich (2004). Review by Samuel Glanville

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Survey

Installation View of Survey at Jerwood Space, London, 3 October - 16 December 2018.

An assembly of work from fifteen early career artists who have been nominated from across the UK, ‘Survey’ is an exhibition comprising a wide range of disciplines. From film, performance and drawing, to painting, ceramics and installation, it gives rising voices within the sector the opportunity to stand out and stand up. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Sadie Coles, 1 Davies Street, London, W1K 3DB

Paul Anthony Harford

Untitled (mother asleep with masked child)

The most poignant works in the exhibition are the drawings in which Harford depicts his mother, frail and clearly coming to the end of her life, she’s shown sleeping under thick covers, already starting to slip away. In one drawing, a thick safety rail cuts in front of the composition, signaling that her separation has already begun. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London, W1B 1AD

Disappear Here: On perspective and other kinds of space

Disappear Here: On perspective and other kinds of space RIBA exhibition designed by Sam Jacob studio

“Disappear Here is not a history of perspective”, immediately declares the introductory wall text. Instead, RIBA’s exhibition offers a selection of curiously, sometimes bewilderingly, diverse, subversive readings of the system of spatial representation. Review by Henry Broome

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Lily Brooke Gallery, 3 Ada Rd, Camberwell, London SE5 7RW

Charlie Godet Thomas: WHAT IS IT, THIS TIME?

Song of Experience

In his current show WHAT IS IT, THIS TIME? at Lily Brooke gallery, Charlie Godet Thomas transforms the immateriality of flat text into three-dimensional sculptural objects, capturing the moment words carve an emotional space in the mind of a reader and the outside world. Review by Matthew Turner

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The Showroom, 63 Penfold St, Marylebone, London NW8 8PQ

Feminist Library

Feminist library installation view

Placing the ‘Expressions’ exhibition in direct dialogue with the ‘Feminist Library on Loan’ at The Showroom shows that local histories of women and non-binary people are important. Together, the two projects manifest a visible platform exposing the experiences of those living in the Church Street Ward in the context of feminist chronicles. Review by Ashley Janke

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Michael Jackson: On the Wall

Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II (Michael Jackson)

The religious aspects of the exhibition are divided. Some works stand as testament to Jackson’s enigmatic international appeal. One room contains footage from the 1992 Dangerous world tour, revealing delirious crowds, a mass euphoria even outstripping Beatlemania: while the Fab Four played to 55,000 people at Shea Stadium in 1965, Jackson’s concert in Bucharest is estimated to have been attended by nearly 100,000. And the numbers don’t stop there: more than 1,000,000 fans are said to have congregated outside Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, while the televised spectacle itself is said to have been watched by more than 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. “We’re more popular than Jesus,” said Lennon of the Beatles in 1966. One wonders where this places Jackson. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court, Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

Hazel Brill: Shonisaurus Popularis

Hazel Brill: SHONISAURUS POPULARIS installation view

For an artist whose work often deals with fantasy and simulation, Las Vegas is an ideal subject for Brill, its evolution as a setting for desire, is a perfect mirror for her distinctive, cinematic and kaleidoscopic installations. Review by Piers Masterson

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CGP London, The Gallery by the Pool, 1 Park Approach, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA

The Everyday Political

The Everyday Political installation view 2018

As the exhibition attempts to showcase an emerging contemporary art scene in the North East, Lenihan and Meikle while critiquing the banal geographical rubric used by the current Great North Exhibition – this exhibition is not part of the official programme – the pair insightfully identify ‘restorative nostalgia’ and the appeal of the ‘off-modern’ as two subjects that fixate the cultural landscape of the region. Review by Piers Masterson

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Hayward Gallery, London

Lee Bul

Installation view of Lee Bul Via Negativa II 2014 at Hayward Gallery 2018  (interior detail) copyright Lee Bul 2018  Photo Linda Nylind

A few months ago, a group of scientists claimed the octopus might be an alien from outer space...

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Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London, NW1 5DA

Mary Corse

Mary Corse, installation view, Lisson Gallery London, May 2018

Mary Corse’s first major UK show at Lisson Gallery, London, is as much a scientific inquiry as it is art. Newtonian science extracts emotion from the situations it is used to examine, the same, by extension, could be said of its strange alter ego quantum mechanics. Review by Matthew Turner

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves

Installation Image of Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves at Whitechapel Gallery

Entering Katja Novitskova’s ‘Invasion Curves’ at Whitechapel Gallery is like stepping into the set of a science fiction film. Metallic wires, flashing lights, giant eggs and a human brain occupy the gallery space. Surrounding this landscape, floating sheets of Perspex and resin hang from the ceiling and display phrases such as ‘the right to harvest resources’, ‘we are at an inflection point’, and the title ‘invasion curves’. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Mother's Tankstation, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Maria Farrar: Eaves Deep

Dresser

Though it appears brittle, the Greyhound is strong and quick, its structure contradicts its force. Similarly with Maria Farrar’s paintings, lines become not just convenient structure, but a directional thing-in-itself. Review by Alex Bennett

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