Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Myvillages: Setting the Table: Village Politics

Farmers & Ranchers, Deer Trail USA, 2013

Myvillages, the collective behind ‘Setting the Table: Village Politics’, was set up in 2003 by Kathrin Böhm, Wapke Feenstra, and Antje Schiffers. On their website the group give an indicative statement about the exhibition: it seeks, they write, to ‘equip the gallery as a space from where to access our and your own interest and knowledge about the rural’. Review by Harriet Smith Hughes

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ICA,The Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5AH

I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker

Installation view of I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker at ICA, London, 2019

Kathy Acker was a plagiarist, a pirate, an emblem of postmodernism, a fascinating and complicated person, but most importantly, she was a writer. A literary exhibition is a challenging project, and so fuelled by a desire to see what curatorial decisions would locate writing visually, I went to see ‘I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker’ at the ICA - surely if any writer can sustain an exhibition it would be Acker. Review by Katie McCain

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold, Installation view, 6 June - 8 September 2019, Serpentine Galleries

As I walk through the Serpentine Gallery’s retrospective of her 50-year career I can’t get Faith Ringgold, the person, out of my mind. The works on display, despite many of them depicting horrific scenes of physical and social violence; the riots that took place during the civil rights era of 1950s and 60s America; gender inequality; the Black Power movement and the manipulation of black bodies in white consumer-capitalist culture, are permeated with the same warmth and affirmative energy that emanates from the artist in her interviews. This is an unusual brand of ‘political’ art; the works are critical, incisive and defiant, yet the tone remains warm and positive, even joyful - much like the artist herself. Review by India Nielsen

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Makers Open

Mark Corfield-Moore, Celestial Meteors, 2019 (left); Nitrous Flame, 2019 (middle) and Golden Showers, 2019 (right). Dyed Warp, handwoven cotton in oak frame.

The work in this year’s Jerwood Makers Open is undoubtedly beautiful and desirable. But it also resists quick consumption. Investigations into traditional craft processes, social anxieties and climate change all appear in this meditation on making. Review by Bernard Hay

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Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, Soho, London W1F 9JJ

Callum Innes: Keeping Time

Installation view, Callum Innes: Keeping Time

When entering Frith Street Gallery, there is an initial risk of misunderstanding Callum Innes’ work. A visitor could easily glance at the paintings here, determine them to be simple and flat, and they could walk away. However, Innes’ pieces function almost like impressionist works - only up-close do his markings and layers become apparent, and you suddenly become aware that each piece is an arrangement of layers and brushstrokes on a canvas, each possessing different finishes and textures. Review by Lois Morton

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Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Rd, Bermondsey, London SE16 4DF

Dean Kenning: Psychobotanical

Dean Kenning, Psychobotanical, 2019, installation view

The centrepiece of Dean Kenning’s new show ‘Psychobotanical’ is ‘Untitled (Rubber Plant)’, a kinetic sculpture made of silicon. On a waist-high plinth, two perfectly white, tendrilled sculptures are motorised to interact with each other in a way which seems both random and imbued with human gesture – somewhere between the wavy wind-sock creatures you see outside MOT garages and a gallery-friendly ‘Day Of The Triffids’. Review by Lucy Holt

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Delfina Foundation, 29/31 Catherine Place, London SW1E 6DY

Asunción Molinos Gordo: Accumulation by Dispossession

Asunción Molinos Gordo, Accumulation by Dispossession, 2019. Exhibition at Delfina Foundation

As a part of the current programme at Delfina Foundation, ‘The Politics of Food’, the artist Asunción Molinos Gordo draws on ideas and techniques responding to the destructive system of food production and its ambivalent, two-faced character. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, 42-44 Pollard Row, London E2 6NB

Ian Giles: Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag

Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag, presented by Gasworks and videoclub

Before occupying their own spaces, queer communities would gather at ‘gay nights’ in establishments where drinks prices were raised for punters with no alternative. Subverting previous migratory notions, Ian Giles presented ‘Trojan Horse / Rainbow Flag’ at the queer-run Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club. The event featured a screening of his new film by the same name, alongside video works by five other artists that discuss the past, present and future of queer spaces. Review by Ryan Kearney

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Castor, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Alan Magee: Data Dust, Dust Data

Celestial Machines Drop ceiling, Light panel, Screen, Video, Robotic arm, Arduino, Raspberry pi and Circuitry 130 x 130 x 95cm, 2019

Upon entering ‘Data Dust, Dust Data’, Alan Magee’s second exhibition at Castor Projects, the visitor is immediately confronted by two contrasting artworks: go left towards a hanging, high-tech exhibit that includes a tangle of wires and exposed circuitry and a motionless robotic arm, or right towards a chest-height, curvilinear plinth topped with black foam and displaying a dozen small, pinkish objects. Review by Rebecca Morrill

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TACO!, 30 Poplar Place, Thamesmead, London SE28 8BA

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?

Joe Cheetham: Can You Feel It?, installation view, TACO!

The current exhibition ‘Can You Feel It?’ explores the polaric feelings of euphoria and loss which surround 90s rave culture and its legacy. Artist Joe Cheetham, known primarily for his works on canvas, has here created a gallery-spanning wall mural which depicts a number of beano-on-ecstasy style cartoon characters, straight from the pages of Viz magazine. Review by Amy Jones

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Pedro Neves Marques: It Bites Back

Pedro Neves Marques, It Bites Back, 2019 (featuring music by HAUT). Exhibition view at Gasworks, London.

Through the in-depth analysis of virus warfare and the rising number of actions against queer bodies around the globe, the exhibition ‘It Bites Back’ draws on distinguishing power agents, such as hormones and fluids, as symbols for forces that reign in our everyday lives and which define the 21st century’s approach to biopolitics. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Copperfield Gallery, 6 Copperfield Street, London SE1 0EP

Alba Folgado in conversation with Marco Godoy

Marco Godoy: My we, your we, our we. Installation view at Copperfield, London

Alba Folgado speaks to artist Marco Godoy about his exhibition My we, your we, our we at Copperfield Gallery. His interest in the complexity of power relationships and the mechanisms that are used to perpetuate social divisions are made evident through the different works that one finds in the space.

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Mandy El-Sayegh: Cite Your Sources

Mandy El-Sayegh, Cite Your Sources (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019.

Verbal language dominates and hits you like a wave; pages from the Financial Times are pasted up the gallery walls and underfoot; silk-screened advertising copy, schematics and Arabic calligraphy are layered on top of maps, passport-photocopies, grids and each other. Review by India Nielsen

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