Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, Mayfair, London W1S 3ET

Trevor Paglen: Bloom

Installation view of Trevor Paglen: Bloom, Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London, September 10 - November 10, 2020.

The gallery attendant at Pace warned me before I could even get a foot through the door. By entering, she explained, I'm consenting to being filmed. It's nothing to worry about, of course— it's just art. But that's precisely Trevor Paglen’s point. He has spent his career exploring the nature of artificial intelligence and data collection and, in this new exhibition, offers a reminder that these practices are never as benign as they appear. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

Further reading +

Seventeen, 270-276 Kingsland Road, London E8 4DG

Gabriella Boyd: For Days

Gabriella Boyd, Stream, 2020, Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm

The works have largely one-word titles, and have the ability to describe something large and boundaryless: ‘Stream’, ‘Flood’, ‘Bad Decisions’, ‘Constellation‘; and in other instances specific anatomical objects of focus – ‘Retina’; ‘Tract’, ‘Spit’. The decision to title in this way leaves the viewer with a tight entry point, that either hones into a specific event or zooms out to a dynamic that goes beyond the capacities of the frame. Review by Alice Gale-Feeny

Further reading +

Platform Southwark, 1 Joan St, South Bank, London SE1 8BS

GLF at 50: The Art of Protest

Installation view, GLF at 50: The Art of Protest, Platform Southwark, London

In 1970, a group of students started weekly meetings at the London School of Economics; they called for an end to discrimination against homosexuals in employment, education, the age of consent and in being treated as mentally unwell. Celebrating 50 years of activism, radical protest and positive queerness ‘GLF at 50: The Art of Protest’ at Platform Southwark is part of a sprinkling of events marking half a century of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) and their core assertion that ‘Gay is Good’. Their manifesto (republished for this exhibition) was a seminal clarion call for equality. Review by Ian Giles

Further reading +

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover Street, London W1S 4NJ

Hito Steyerl and Harun Farocki: Life Captured Still

Harun Farocki Installation view, Harun Farocki & Hito Steyerl, Life Captured Still, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, London

For those who might ask why her work resonated so thoroughly with the generation just before her, the 'Life Captured Still' exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac may offer some answers. A selection of Hito Steyerl’s work was shown alongside a major influence on her life and work; the late filmmaker and video artist Harun Farocki. This exploration of the connections between these two prominent German filmmakers and visual artists was the first major posthumous exhibition of Harun Farocki’s work in the UK and, remarkably, the first exhibition to put their work in conversation together. Review by Chris Hayes

Further reading +

Intersticio London, 469 Bethnal Green Road, E2 9QH London

Adrenaline Querubín featured in Where Water Rumbles, Metalloids

Intervention piece by Esther Gatón

Intersticio London and its inaugural exhibition, ‘Where Water Rumbles, Metalloids’ allowed curator Cristina Herráiz and artist Esther Gatón to “deform the inherited ways of working and showing”. Speaking with Emma O'Brien, their discussion ranged from an analysis of societal discourse in the context of Covid-19, the notion of an altered normality and the role artists play in rethinking strategies in order to drive forward the changes we need to see in the world at large.

Further reading +

Cole Projects, London and online

Ritual For A New Regime

Ritual For A New Regime

During the silence of lockdown, questions about how the pandemic would affect the development of cities began to circle frantically. While established models threatened to crumble, in the property world, planning restrictions were relaxed to encourage building and accelerate development. In an ex-military site in north London, curator Camilla Cole has made use of this transitional period for a new project that reflects upon the current, peculiar moment in history. Review by Gabriella Sonabend

Further reading +

Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, 6 Heddon Street, London W1B 4BT

Painting with Light: The Photography of Ming Smith

Ming Smith, Trio in Gambela, Ethiopia, (1973/2003), archival pigment print, 40.6 x 50.8 c

Smith's photographic style is candid street photography, expressive rather than direct documentation. Embedded within her photographs is emotion, feeling, and life enhanced by the precise colour and light that forms each composition. Review by Sheena Carrington

Further reading +

Josh Lilley, 40 - 46 Riding House Street, London W1W 7EX

Tom Anholt: Notes on Everything

Tom Anholt, installation view

Anholt is as much a raconteur as a painter. There are not many contemporary artists, or writers for that matter, who can set a scene better. Figures plucked from his reverie traipse across the canvas in technicolour pyjamas like lost sleepwalkers in scenery that resembles a psychedelic underworld. Review by Ted Targett

Further reading +

Camden Art Centre, Arkwright Rd, London NW3 6DG

The Botanical Mind Online

O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix (screen 1)

‘The Botanical Mind: Art, Mysticism and The Cosmic Tree’ was originally intended to be an in-house group exhibition at Camden Art Centre. Instead, the spread of COVID-19 and the closure of public gallery spaces saw the show move to the digital realm and become ‘The Botanical Mind Online’. The exhibition is hosted at botanicalmind.online, which serves as both the main space to read about the themes and topics of the show, and the central repository for a number of digital offerings, from videos, sound recordings, and podcasts to texts. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, Charing Cross, London WC2N 5DN

Backlit: On Visiting The National Gallery, London from Home

Room 11 at The National Gallery, London

Since the lockdown announcement on the 23rd March, galleries and museums across the UK have been emphasising the scope and availability of their digital collections, encouraging the public to engage with high-resolution reproductions of their artefacts online. Considering the work of art in the age of digital reproduction may not be a new phenomenon. And yet, the enthusiasm with which many institutions have been vocalising the accessibility of their archives on the Internet raises the volume on several important questions regarding the significance, if any, of the artwork as a physical, encounterable object, and the responsibility of museums to ensure that their collections are available online. Review by Rowland Bagnall

Further reading +

Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

Cao Fei: Blueprints

Cao Fei, Nova, 2019, Video

On the wall of a lobby, against a deep red velvet backdrop, a prophetic message welcomes the visitor: ‘In our splendid universe, motion pictures mirror our reality’. In Cao Fei’s ‘Blueprints’, different worlds merge and flip. Combining theatrical sets, photography, moving images, and her first VR work, the artist traces patterns of reality, teleporting visitors through distant territories and histories. Focusing on the district of Jiuxianqiao in Beijing, where the first Chinese computer was invented, the exhibition offers local perspectives of contemporary technological developments in China, mapping feelings that resonate globally. Review by Giulia Civardi

Further reading +

Danielle Arnaud Gallery, 123 Kennington Rd, Prince's, London SE11 6SF

David Cotterrell | Mirror III: Horizon

David Cotterrell, Mirror III Horizon, 2016, 2 Channel HD Projection, Custom Morse Code Generators and iOs App, duration: 10 mins 06 secs, HD video, Made in collaboration with Ruwanthie de Chickera.

‘Mirror III: Horizon’ is part of a broader’ project series’ created by London-based artist David Cotterrell in collaboration with Ruwanthie de Chikera. ‘Mirror III: Horizon’ is part of the six-week online programme curated by Tess Charnley of Danielle Arnaud Gallery, titled ‘Mis(sing) Communication. ‘Mirror III: Horizon’ is profoundly complex, evident in both the making of the project and also throughout the thematic intersections the work addresses. These intersections relate to anxiety and empathy, feelings brought forth by the inherent fear of isolation, risk and the unknown. All this is set against the context of the ongoing global refugee crisis. Review by Sheena Carrington

Further reading +

Castor Projects, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London SE8 4AL

Rafal Zajko: Resuscitation

Installation view with Zajko as Chochol

Breathing and the nature of our bodies as something that air passes through have never been considered so urgently as in this show. Rafal Zajko, a London-based, Polish artist, has been making wall-based works that look like vents for a year - a fact I discovered during a remote conversation with Zajko to discuss his exhibition, Resuscitation, at Castor Projects in London, which was open for just one day before its closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Review by Laura O’Leary

Further reading +