Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Luxembourg & Dayan, 2 Savile Row, Mayfair, London W1S 3PA

The Ends of Collage: London

Installation view, The Ends of Collage, Luxembourg & Dayan, London, 10 March - 13 May 2017

While on one count, the show’s conception of collage is flawed, it presents a complete and compelling account of its connection to other mediums. Review by Henry Broome

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CANAL, 60 De Beauvoir Crescent, London N1 5SB

Justyna Scheuring: Everyone, Merry-Go-Round

Justyna Scheuring: Everyone, Merry-Go-Round, CANAL

Scheuring spoke in her performance about the desire to express suffering caused by a sense of alienation. At the same time she tried to draw attention to the impossibility of conveying the overbearing experience to others by means of established cultural codes. Review by Dr Dominik Kuryłek

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Drawing Room, Unit 8 Rich Estate, 46 Willow Walk London SE1 5SF

Drawing Biennial 2017

 Drawing Biennial 2017, Photography by Dan Weill

Drawing Biennial 2017 offers insights into how artists contend with a world in rapid and disorienting flux. A snapshot of contemporary drawing practices, the exhibition includes more than 200 new and recent works on paper by leading international artists of different generations.

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Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Maria Lassnig, A Painting Survey, 1950 – 2007

Schicksalslinien / Be-Ziehungen VIII (Lines of Fate / Re-lations VIII)

With relentless honesty, wit and self-irony, the Austrian painter Maria Lassnig explores her corporeality and shocks by simply making tangible the most fundamental common experience of us all – inhabiting a human body. Review by Katharina Günther

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

David Ferrando Giraut: The Accursed Stare

David Ferrando Giraut, CATOPTROPHILIA, 2013. Installation view.

David Ferrando Giraut’s recent works weave a neon path through progressive economic theories and 17,000 years of image-making, arriving at the present day clad in Louboutin and dripping in gold. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Richard Mosse: Incoming

Still frame from Incoming, 2015-2016. Three screen video installation by Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost.

In ‘Incoming’, the other is played by the European state apparatus. In their helmets, suits and protective gear, those that meet and interact with the refugees are rendered alien in the thermographic camera’s aesthetic. Mosse’s camera is able to present the true inhumanity of the crisis by inverting the roles of the migrant and those enforcing the violent borders. Review by David Lee Astley

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The RYDER, 19a Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Ewa Axelrad: SATIS

Ewa Axelrad: SATIS, Installation view at The RYDER Projects, London, 9 March - 15 April 2017

It’s difficult not to flinch when the word ‘satis’ ricochets through the sober silence of Ewa Axelrad’s exhibition at The RYDER, even after you have heard it for the first time. This sonic intrusion continues to hang in the air as much as it cuts through it with a repeating interval. Review by Joseph Constable

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Auto Italia, 44 Bonner Rd, London E2 9JS

Feral Kin

Feral Kin, Auto Italia South East (2017). Installation detail (left to right): Billy Howard Price, Taut Pupil (2017). Digital print. Jaakko Pallasvuo, MASK (2016) written by Huw Lemmey & Jaakko Pallasvuo. Single channel video.

‘Feral Kin’ is London’s first glimpse into Auto Italia’s collaborative, ongoing project ‘On Coping’. From Johannesburg to Copenhagen, Auto Italia has brought ‘On Coping’ across the world. Working locally with artists in each city, the project seeks to unpack the artist precariat by developing systems of growth through collaboration. Review by Ashley Janke

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SE8 Gallery, 171 Deptford High Street, London SE8 3NU

João Biscainho: Future Nothingness

Rock Interior (2012-2014) and Uncanny River (the Crossing) (2014-2015)

In ‘Future Nothingness’ material and materiality are merged together by Portuguese artist João Biscainho in a well-choreographed display. The exhibition presents a series of works from 2013 – 2015 that take us into a series of marine references, using fluids as the main vehicle to transport the meaning of the works in the semi-dark space of the gallery. Review by Cristina Ramos González

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ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

As the main player in a game of shifting dynamics of authority, Boyce enables a fairly unpredictable performative situation but avoids direct involvement in the action. Later on, the artist reshapes the remains of the past event, so to create an installation that aims to become a space for new experience. Review by Chiara Cartuccia

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Jamie Crewe: Female Executioner

Jamie Crewe, Female Executioner, 2017. Installation view.

‘Female Executioner’ translates the 1884 work, ‘Monsieur Venus: A Materialist Novel’, into compact visual sequences theatrically staged across the sparse Gasworks gallery. Review by Ashley Janke

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Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1S 1BP

Tim Noble and Sue Webster: STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS

Tim Noble and Sue Webster, STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS, 2017, Installation view

Their exaggerated expressions, dishevelled hair and naked bodies rendered with a cartoonish aesthetic make an adequate mockery of the Mayfair surroundings. The artists are seemingly running riot in their white cube play-pen. Review by Cleo Roberts

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