Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

The Photographers' Gallery, 16-18 Ramillies St, Soho, London W1F 7LW

All I Know Is What’s On The Internet

Degoutin & Wagon, World Brain, 2015, HD Video. All I Know Is What Is On The Internet, on display at The Photographers' Gallery until 24 February 2019.

To this exhibition’s immense credit, it avoids engaging in knee-jerk satire of the American President. Instead, his words serve as a jumping-off point to consider the blurrier than ever line between fact and fiction, and the changing nature of ‘the image’. Review by Adam Heardman

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The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Rachel Maclean: The Lion and The Unicorn

The Lion and The Unicorn, Rachel Maclean, 2012

Maclean’s video work was created in the frenzied build up to the Scottish referendum, and sees the lion and unicorn from the Royal Coat of Arms personified by the artist in outrageously lurid get-up, lampooning the ridiculous regalia of power. Review by Clare Robson

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The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019

Sofia Mitsola, Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019, installation view

For its spring show, Jerwood Visual Arts has commissioned new bodies of work from three artists at pivotal points in their careers: Kitty Clark, Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom and Sofia Mitsola. This is the fourth iteration of Jerwood Solo Presentations, and the guidance notes explain that there is no curatorial theme uniting the chosen artists; these are three very different offerings, but each is powerful in its own way. Review by Anna Souter

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Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome

Installation views: Art Now: Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome, 2018

In the single-room space Tate Britain has devoted to the current ‘Art Now’ exhibition, there’s a crooked forest made from crutches and open ring-binders, clustered in front of a wall with a large, cartoonish hole punched through it. The piece is Jesse Darling’s ‘St Jerome in the Wilderness’ (2018). Walking between the sticks and peering into the gap in the wall, you’re confronted with the slapstick tragedy of physical existence. ‘Brazen Serpent’ (2018), a walking-stick coiled to look like a snake, seems to follow you through the “trees”. In trying to protect or medicate ourselves, perhaps we’re in fact acknowledging our own fragility. You can’t avoid the threat implicit within contingency plans. Review by Adam Heardman

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Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 Duke Street, St James's, London SW1Y 6BN

Amie Siegel: Backstory

The Noon Complex, 2016, three-channel HD video installation, colour/sound, edition 2 of 5 + 2AP

Amie Siegel’s exhibition ‘Backstory’ at London’s Thomas Dane Gallery opens with an unassuming series of works on paper. ‘Body Scripts’ (2015) consists of framed pages from a novel by Italian novelist Alberto Moravia that was the inspiration for Jean-Luc Godard’s classic film ‘Contempt’ (1963). Using only pages that feature the female protagonist, the artist uses sea-blue paint to erase phrases and sentences that don’t directly refer to the character. The result is an architectural geometry that flows from frame to frame and creates a visual context for the actions of the protagonist. Review by Anna Souter

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William Benington Gallery, unit 3, 50 Tower Bridge Rd, London SE1 4TR

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts

An Arrangement in Two Halves, a Bench in Two Parts #06 and #07

This is a show in two parts, the first of which blurs the artistic personas of the two artists in displaying a deconstructed functionless kit of parts throughout the gallery space, before – in part two – being reconfigured into a bench and other wall-based pieces, at which point the two artists’ practices are clearly delineated. Review by Matthew Turner

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Christine Ay Tjoe: Black, kcalB, Black, kcalB

Christine Ay Tjoe, Black, kcalB, Black, kcalB, White Cube Bermondsey, 28 November 2018 - 20 January 2019

Christine Ay Tyoe’s second exhibition at White Cube presents the artist in a darker, pensive, more Gothic mood than her more colourful debut here in 2016. Half the works shown are a series of aluminium etching plates on which the artist has drawn in black ink a bestiary of her familiar grotesques. Review by Piers Masterson

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Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London SE5 7RW

Evy Jokhova: Weighed down by stones

Totem XII, 2018, MDF, paint, castor wheels, Perspex, acoustic felt, stone collection, motion sensors, computer, headphones, 60 x 60 x 152 cm (detail)

At Lily Brooke, Evy Jokhova’s latest installation ‘Weighed down by stones’ is archaeological, concerning the weight of the past upon the present and the possibility of returning to it. Review by Jacob Charles Wilson

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ICA,The Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5AH

Metahaven: VERSION HISTORY

Metahaven, Eurasia (Questions on Happiness) 2018. Installation view of Metahaven: VERSION HISTORY at Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, 3 October - 13 January 2019

For ‘Version History’, their current exhibition at the ICA in London, the collective have brought together three recent films and a digital essay to reflect on the loss of truth that arises from our collective immersion in digital technologies. Review by Bernard Hay

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Victoria Miro, 14 St George St, Mayfair, London W1S 1FH

Ilse D’Hollander

Untitled

In much the same way as Francesca Woodman though, whose early death at the age of just 22 has made her into something of a cult figure, D’Hollander’s paintings are cast in the shadow of her personal history. Review by Claire Phillips

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Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, St James's, London SE14 6AD

Kris Lemsalu: 4Life

Kris Lemsalu, Holy Hell O (2018).

For her first solo exhibition in London, ‘4LIFE’, multidisciplinary artist Kris Lemsalu transforms the upstairs galleries at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art into a supernatural realm, occupied with otherworldly, absurdist characters that guide you through stages of birth, life and death. Review by Julia Schouten

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Auto Italia, 44 Bonner Road, London E2 9JS

Gran Fury: Read My Lips

Kissing Doesn't Kill, Gran Fury, 1990, vinyl wall poster

‘Read My Lips’ is a powerful retrospective of agitprop collective Gran Fury, an autonomous unit stemming from the New York caucus of radical international direct action group ‘AIDs Coalition To Unleash Power’ or ACT UP. Review by Sophie Risner

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