Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Anna-Sophie Berger: A Failed Play

A Failed Play, Installation View, 2019, Anna-Sophie Berger

It is fitting that the accompanying exhibition text for ‘A Failed Play’, written by Anna Sophie-Berger herself, opens with a story that leaves out the play entirely. The focus is on everything but - Beckett’s declaration of it as a failure, his begrudging agreement to translate it for publication in English, and the fight that ensued over copyright following his death. Review by India Nielsen

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1F 9DY

Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

Installation View of Allan Sekula: Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium

‘Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium’ presents an extensive exhibition by the late American artist and writer Allan Sekula (1951-2013). While the title aims to highlight the medium’s aporias, the show extends across photography, performance, text, and video, contrasting photography’s material mediations with its claim to realism. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, Shadwell, London E1 7QX

Is This Tomorrow?

Jacolby Satterwhite and Andrés \Jaque / Office for Political Innovation, 2019, Spirits Roaming the Earth

'Is This Tomorrow?’ has invited architects and artists to work together to create a series of installations on the future, many of whom are working together for the first time. But whereas the 1956 exhibition aimed to position the arts as a positive and driving force for society, in ‘Is This Tomorrow?’ it is wider developments, be they technological, social or political, that become the dangerous forces the collaborators seek to address. Review by Bernard Hay

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17-19 Triton Street, Regents Place

CLIMATE: CHANGING OUR CULTURE, RESTORING OUR ENVIRONMENT

PANEL: Sol Bailey-Barker, Nissa Nishikawa, Daniel Hudson, Extinction Rebellion & Colin Tudge. Chaired by Gabriella Sonabend. A panel discussion organised as part of exhibition 'Sisyphus in Retrograde' at 17-19 Triton Street, Regents Place, London until May 4th 2019.

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Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Geta Brătescu: The Power of the Line

Geta Brătescu, Jocul formelor (Game of Forms), 2010, Collage, drawing on paper, 4 parts, 45 x 60 cm

Hauser & Wirth, working closely with the artist before her death and with Ivan Gallery, has put together a museum-quality exhibition of this remarkable artist’s work. The show draws together pieces from the last decade, a period in which Brătescu’s practice focused on working with the line as a structuring principle. Review by Anna Souter

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Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 4PY

FOCUS: Agnes Martin

FOCUS: Agnes Martin. Installation view, Levy Gorvy, London, 2019.

This is an artist who spent her life in the pursuit of abstract painting: grids and stripes, minimal yet expressive abstractions, imperfect horizontal lines in soft, pastel shades and faint, pencil-drawn grids. A similarly meditative, light-bathed atmosphere pervades the film, and it is a revelation to see Martin’s artistic vision realised in the bread-and-butter reality of the physical landscape. Review by Clare Robson

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone: Webb-Ellis, Richard Whitby

The Lost Ones by Richard Whitby as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2019: Going, Gone exhibition at Jerwood Space

‘Going, Gone’ is the latest installment of the Jerwood/FVU Awards, and brings us two newly-commissioned films by winning artists Richard Whitby and Webb-Ellis. This year’s work ‘takes Britain’s declared exit from the European Union as a starting point for reflection on other collective experiences of transition and loss. Review by Jack Head

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tracey Emin A Fortnight of Tears

Tracey Emin, A Fortnight of Tears, White Cube Bermondsey, 6 February - 7 April 2019

The paintings in this exhibition splatter the flesh, blood and mucus palettes of Francis Bacon and Cy Twombly across Egon Schiele’s warped technical accuracy of human anatomy. It’s some of the best painting Emin has done for years and is enough to carry the less potent parts of the exhibition. The neon and the selfies seem to blare some loud but ineloquent kind of intimacy at you, and don’t come near the compositional mastery of the paintings and sculptures. Review by Adam Heardman

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NS

Rose English: Form, Feminisms, Femininities

Rose English, Plato's Chair, Vancouver, 1983, Gelatin silver print, 69 x 69 cm

Two lovers lie in bed sleeping. Their duvet is a ploughed field, fabric folds replaced with the undulating peaks and troughs of soil furrows. An air of the uncanny pervades ‘Bed in Field’ (1971), a series of photographs of British performance artist Rose English and her partner of the time tucked into a pastoral landscape. Review by Lotte Johnson

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Beatrice Gibson: Crone Music

Beatrice Gibson, Deux Soeurs Qui Ne Sont Pas Soeurs (Two Sisters who Are Not Sisters) Crone Music, Installation View, Camden Arts Centre 2019

Slightly obscured by a mass of literary and cinematic citations Beatrice Gibson’s ‘Crone Music’ contains a powerful narration of maternal fantasies and a study of the anxieties of millennial parenthood. Review by Piers Masterson

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Libita Clayton: Quantum Ghost

Libita Clayton, Quantum Ghost, 2019. Installation view.

For Libita Clayton’s first UK solo show the artist presents ‘Quantum Ghost’, an interlinked two-part encounter with the politics inherent to her familial heritage and the journey it took to give agency to its legacy. Review by Sophie Risner

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Ghislaine Leung: CONSTITUTION

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery evades concise summation. Description becomes easily lost in particularities, or overlooks specific works altogether. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd: Joins

Joins, Installation View, 2019, Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd

At the end of a long outdoor corridor filled with palms and tropical plants is Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd’s exhibition ‘Joins’ at Cell Project Space in East London. Bringing together a series of recent works, in addition to two spatial interventions in the gallery, the show explores the infrastructures that produce contemporary domestic space. Review by Bernard Hay

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arebyte Gallery, 7 Botanic Square, Leamouth Peninsula, London E14 0LG

RE-FIGURE-GROUND

Amina Ross, by your hands I open spill out. I'm the inside of an egg I pour we bloom magma rushing from a jagged crown of earth molten and dangerous and alive can't you feel (2018)

‘RE-FIGURE-GROUND’ asks us to re-examine our current positions and proposes alternative futures that go beyond the boundaries of race, gender and sex. Review by Julia Schouten

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