Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Jamie Crewe: Female Executioner

Jamie Crewe, Female Executioner, 2017. Installation view.

‘Female Executioner’ translates the 1884 work, ‘Monsieur Venus: A Materialist Novel’, into compact visual sequences theatrically staged across the sparse Gasworks gallery. Review by Ashley Janke

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Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, London W1S 1BP

Tim Noble and Sue Webster: STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS

Tim Noble and Sue Webster, STICKS WITH DICKS AND SLITS, 2017, Installation view

Their exaggerated expressions, dishevelled hair and naked bodies rendered with a cartoonish aesthetic make an adequate mockery of the Mayfair surroundings. The artists are seemingly running riot in their white cube play-pen. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Frith Street Gallery, Soho Square (60 Frith Street), London

Adrian Paci / Giuliana Racco: Another Place

The Guardians

Informed by Adrian Paci's personal history of exile from Albania to Milan in 1997 during an armed uprising, he is characteristically drawn to dislocating the viewer and exploring the ambiguities of space, and the intersection between fact, fiction, reality and fantasy. His work has found a suitable counterpart in Giuliana Racco. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square, Bloomsbury, London WC1N 1AZ

Mark Neville: Child’s Play

Mark Neville, Arts and Crafts at Somerford Grove Adventure Playground, 2011

The Foundling Museum’s 'Child’s Play' by Mark Neville is a photography exhibition which inhabits that grey, often elusive space between contemporary art, documentary photography and political activism. The project aims to focus attention on attitudes towards play in the UK by bringing together a book, a symposium and this exhibition which presents images of children playing set against a number of vastly contrasting backdrops around the world. Review by Alexander Daniel

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Thomas Dane Gallery 3 Duke Street St James's London SW1Y 6BN

Anya Gallaccio: Beautiful Minds

Anya Gallaccio, Beautiful Minds, 2017. Installation view, Thomas Dane Gallery, London

'Beautiful Minds’ at Thomas Dane Gallery presents a collaborative sculptural installation that interrogates notions of authorship, performativity and our relationship to technology. Review by Zoe Marden

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Ghislaine Leung: The Moves

Pictures, 2017, Ghislaine Leung. Raised floor with sunken recess, black rubber Push to Shove, 2017, Ghislaine Leung. Foam board, tape, carpet, rubber, phones, night lights, video, photos, paper, acetate, mirror, extension cables, cable ties. 61 x 112

The display overwhelms by its absence of images and presents instead a series of glass wall panels bracketed inside aluminium structures. These panels, covered with black vinyl texts, spell out incidental conversations, unsolicited quotes, traces of speech. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Amie Siegel: Strata

Amie Siegel, Quarry, 2015. HD video, colour and sound. Exhibition view South London Gallery, 2017

Siegel probes ideas of value, wealth, attraction and symbolism through her work, presenting a layering of geological and allegorical strata which gives the exhibition its title. Review by Jillian Knipe

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J Hammond Projects, Unit 2B2 Bomb Factory, Boothby Road, London N19 4AJ

Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight)?

Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight) J HAMMOND PROJECTS

The objects we choose to accumulate and surround ourselves with represent a manicured veneer, and what we throw away is more revealing. Isn’t it more exciting to think about how someone would rather not be perceived? Liam Hess considers group exhibition 'Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight)?'

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Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

Peter Halley: Paintings from the 1980s

Peter Halley, Paintings from the 1980s, exhibition view, Modern Art.

The works focus on paintings, drawings and prints from a pivotal period in his career, 1982-1987. It is during this period that Halley began developing a striking signature visual language that he has refined and expanded on over the last four decades. It is comprised of textured and flat geometric elements that he refers to as prisons, cells and conduits. These seemingly abstract compositions were reflections of the increasing geometric divisions of the social and domestic spaces Halley saw people inhabiting. Review by William Davie

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Breese Little, Unit 1, 249 - 253 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 6JY

Parallax scrolling

Parallax scrolling, Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague, Installation View

‘Parallax scrolling’ is an exhibition that proposes a series of visual tactics by artists Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague. These invite viewers to engage with perception and perspective by utilising simple optical devices, drawing our attention to the process of representation. Review by Cristina Ramos González

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

Tropical Hangover

Tropical Hangover, installation view.

In the hot, damp climate of the rainforest, no sooner than an animal or plant dies, it begins to decay, feeding the maggots and soil from which new life grows. The tropics are an uncompromisingly ugly environment. The notion of nature’s immutable beauty is a human construction; one, as Tenderpixel’s group show ‘Tropical Hangover’ reveals, perpetuated by art. Henry Broome reviews

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The Showroom, 63 Penfold Street, London NW8 8PQ

Laura Oldfield Ford: Alpha/Isis/Eden

Laura Oldfield Ford, Alpha/Isis/Eden, installation view, The Showroom, 2017

Her omnipresence comes from a series of movements through the landscape as a squatter and activist. It is through Oldfield Ford’s political ideologies that the thematic of resistance in her work surfaces. Review by Sophie Risner

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Pump House Gallery, Battersea Park, London SW11 4NJ

Pilvi Takala: The Committee

Pilvi Takala, detail of The Committee project, 2013-2017, Pump House Gallery, London.

Pilvi Takala's ‘The Committee’ is a charming and timely exhibition that comments on the value of creativity for children, the opportunities it affords them and, significantly, is told from their perspective. Bobby Jewell reviews

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