Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Stanley Picker Gallery, Kingston University, London Kingston School of Art, Grange Road, Kingston upon Thames KT1 2QJ

P!CKER, PART II Céline Condorelli: Prologue

Céline Condorelli, ‘Prologue' (2017), installation view, Stanley Picker Gallery at Kingston University London.

Condorelli’s prologue is merely the latest episode in a continuous process of exchange and renewal, where the legacy of a project – in this case both Lustig Cohen’s show, and Condorelli’s own show at P! last year – is archived, mined and reworked, forming new projects, new exhibitions, and new ways of understanding the contexts within which we work. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover Street, London W1S 4NJ

Lee Bul: After Bruno Taut

Lee Bul, After Bruno Taut, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Through complex and elaborate works, Lee Bul portrays failed models that echo the qualities of utopian systems of early twentieth century architecture as well as the politics of totalitarian regimes. The works displayed in ‘After Bruno Taut’ at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac strongly emphasise the excess and fragility of our world, and our failure to control it. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Rose Wylie: Quack Quack

 Rose Wylie, Installation view, Quack Quack, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London

Rose Wylie’s paintings have previously been dismissed as ‘childish’. Her forms are decisive, irreverent, lucid; facial expressions are often reduced to a mere few brushstrokes. In this way, her paintings are, in fact, childhood remembered and rendered exactly as it exists for us as adults – as hazy fragments, as depictions not just of events or places, but of how it felt to be there. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 & 11 Duke Street St James's, London SW1Y 6BN

Phillip King: Colour on Fire & Ceramics 1995-2017

Phillip King, Ceramics 1995-2017, 2017. Installation view

The ceramics mark a key departure in King’s work; where previously he had produced mainly large coloured sculptures in steel and plastic, the unglazed vessels speak a quieter aesthetic language. Review by Samuel Glanville

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Tyneside Cinema, 10 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6QG

Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Civil Rites

Film Still, Andrea Luka Zimmerman, Civil Rites

At its core, this is a film about the citizens of Newcastle and their indefatigable spirit of resistance, as it’s expressed itself over centuries. It takes us on a journey through a series of simply and beautifully composed shots of prosaic city spots that have also, at some historical moment, witnessed extraordinary acts of protest. Review by Helena Haimes

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Stuart Shave/Modern Art. 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

David Noonan: A Dark and Quiet Place

David Noonan, exhibition view, Modern Art, Vyner Street, London,

In the current political climate, few things seem more appealing that a quiet, dark room where one can shut out the world. Perhaps it is this escapist fantasy, then, that is the drive behind David Noonan’s new exhibition at Stuart Shave/Modern art entitled ‘A Dark and Quiet Place’. Review by Amy Jones

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

They Are Here: 40 Temps, 8 Days

Temps, 8 Days - Day 8: Reflecting on Life

For their new performance 40 Temps, 8 Days, artist collective They Are Here employed forty temp workers at an hourly rate of £10.50 to do activities normally done in one’s spare time.

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Leonor Antunes: the frisson of the togetherness

Installation view at the Whitechapel Gallery, Leonor Antunes: the frisson of the togetherness, Gallery 2

The installation invites viewers to navigate the gallery’s history without words but through the fully accessible, the common and even the residual, giving the latter a value. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

John Akomfrah: Purple

John Akomfrah: Purple. The Curve, Barbican

Throughout the five movements and epilogue of ‘Purple’, which follow a loose narrative arc beginning at birth and ending with death, and simultaneously show technological progressions from steam engines to artificial intelligence, the screens loop disparate imagery together creating a lyrical essayism. Review by Stan Portus

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The Sunday Painter, 117-119 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1XA

Beatriz Olabarrieta: The only way out is in

Beatriz Olabarrieta, The only way out is in, installation view, The Sunday Painter, 2017

In the first instance Beatriz Olabarrieta's artwork is crooked. Like an oversized yoga mat, 'Open relationship (almost failing red)' (2017) is placed askew of the demarcation grooves set by the floorboards. Only just slightly, which gives it a sense of the accidental. The temptation is to correct its placement, though of course the work remains untouched and introduces an exhibition teasingly just short of the definable and the ideal. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Danielle Arnaud,123 Kennington Road London SE11 6SF

Louisa Fairclough: A Song Cycle for the Ruins of a Psychiatric Unit

Louisa Fairclough, A Rose, 2017.

Unnamed psychic catastrophe is a constant shadow in the work of Louisa Fairclough. Her third solo exhibition at Danielle Arnaud is close and claustrophobic: a shuttered room, a dead fireplace, where daylight plays weakly through small cracks. A web of cables litter the floor, threatening entanglement, disaster, the threshold of the machine. Review by Rowan Lear

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Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

Yoshinori Niwa: That Language Sounds Like a Language

Yoshinori Niwa, That Language Sounds Like a Language, installation view, Edel Assanti

For Yoshinori Niwa's second solo show at Edel Assanti, the Japanese artist presents a series of video works and installations that shine a light on the complex relationship between countries, between governments and their citizens, and between objects and the past. Review by Bobby Jewell

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Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Rachel Whiteread

Untitled (One Hundred Spaces), 1995, Resin, Various dimensions

Whiteread has stretched usual architectural proximity. This creates a large void between interior and exterior realms: expressing a psychological distance and complexity through space. Review by Matthew Turner

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Beth Kettel

Beth Kettel, The Mist of a Pessimist, 2017. Live performance as part of Zabludowicz Collection Invites solo exhibition.

It’s a game show but unlike any you’ve ever seen. Three contestants file wordlessly onto the small stage— animal, human and machine. Familiar and strange, they face the audience. The animal wears a mask, detailed enough to identify it but vague enough to remain unspecific. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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