Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Libita Clayton: Quantum Ghost

Libita Clayton, Quantum Ghost, 2019. Installation view.

For Libita Clayton’s first UK solo show the artist presents ‘Quantum Ghost’, an interlinked two-part encounter with the politics inherent to her familial heritage and the journey it took to give agency to its legacy. Review by Sophie Risner

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Ghislaine Leung: CONSTITUTION

Ghislaine Leung, CONSTITUTION (2019). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Ghislaine Leung’s exhibition at the Chisenhale Gallery evades concise summation. Description becomes easily lost in particularities, or overlooks specific works altogether. Review by Hugh Nicholson

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd: Joins

Joins, Installation View, 2019, Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd

At the end of a long outdoor corridor filled with palms and tropical plants is Rosa Aiello and Patricia L. Boyd’s exhibition ‘Joins’ at Cell Project Space in East London. Bringing together a series of recent works, in addition to two spatial interventions in the gallery, the show explores the infrastructures that produce contemporary domestic space. Review by Bernard Hay

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arebyte Gallery, 7 Botanic Square, Leamouth Peninsula, London E14 0LG

RE-FIGURE-GROUND

Amina Ross, by your hands I open spill out. I'm the inside of an egg I pour we bloom magma rushing from a jagged crown of earth molten and dangerous and alive can't you feel (2018)

‘RE-FIGURE-GROUND’ asks us to re-examine our current positions and proposes alternative futures that go beyond the boundaries of race, gender and sex. Review by Julia Schouten

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Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

Raqs Media Collective, Not Yet At Ease, 2018. Modular padded structure with fabric ceiling, padded stools. Six videos displayed on four monitors and two projections, six channel audio. Dimensions variable.

‘Spinal’, Raqs Media Collective's exhibition at Frith Street Gallery, features the installation ‘Not Yet At Ease’. It reflects on the mental state created by the discomfort and exploitation of First World War soldiers of Asian heritage. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

We are the people. Who are you?

Funda Gul Ozcan, It Happened as Expected, 2018, Four channel video installation, looping, Dimensions variable

A timely exhibition, ‘We are the people. Who are you?’ is an insightful essay representing current anxieties over the health of our electoral democracy. The 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall is looming and as well as reflecting the unpredictable consequences of that historical moment for artists from the former Soviet bloc the show connects the ‘revolution’ of 1989 with the turning point of 2016’s US election and other historical pivots. Review by Piers Masterson

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NJ

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83 installation view

The sun-soaked palette of Rauschenberg’s home on Captiva Island in Florida, where he settled in 1970, is injected into works like Lipstick (Spread) (1981), with its crimson umbrella and smear of bubble-gum pink. Umbrellas find their way back into another highlight of the show, Untitled (Spread) (1982), where two open parasols like blooming sunflowers bring harmony to a reel of collaged pictures of the American flag, shipping containers and lithe athletes. Review by Claire Phillips

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TJ Boulting, 59 Riding House Street, Fitzrovia, London W1W 7EG

Subversive Stitch

Nike + Jöklasoley

In 1984, feminist art historian Rozsika Parker published ‘The Subversive Stitch – Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine’, in which she explored the sociocultural and gendered connotations of sewing and stitching across Western history. Now in 2019, TJ Boulting presents 'Subversive Stitch', a group show examining the legacy of embroidery today – another step in the creation of a contemporary canon of fabric as a serious artistic medium. Review by Anna Souter

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The Photographers' Gallery, 16-18 Ramillies St, Soho, London W1F 7LW

All I Know Is What’s On The Internet

Degoutin & Wagon, World Brain, 2015, HD Video. All I Know Is What Is On The Internet, on display at The Photographers' Gallery until 24 February 2019.

To this exhibition’s immense credit, it avoids engaging in knee-jerk satire of the American President. Instead, his words serve as a jumping-off point to consider the blurrier than ever line between fact and fiction, and the changing nature of ‘the image’. Review by Adam Heardman

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The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Rachel Maclean: The Lion and The Unicorn

The Lion and The Unicorn, Rachel Maclean, 2012

Maclean’s video work was created in the frenzied build up to the Scottish referendum, and sees the lion and unicorn from the Royal Coat of Arms personified by the artist in outrageously lurid get-up, lampooning the ridiculous regalia of power. Review by Clare Robson

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The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019

Sofia Mitsola, Jerwood Solo Presentations 2019, installation view

For its spring show, Jerwood Visual Arts has commissioned new bodies of work from three artists at pivotal points in their careers: Kitty Clark, Appau Jnr Boakye-Yiadom and Sofia Mitsola. This is the fourth iteration of Jerwood Solo Presentations, and the guidance notes explain that there is no curatorial theme uniting the chosen artists; these are three very different offerings, but each is powerful in its own way. Review by Anna Souter

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Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome

Installation views: Art Now: Jesse Darling: The Ballad of Saint Jerome, 2018

In the single-room space Tate Britain has devoted to the current ‘Art Now’ exhibition, there’s a crooked forest made from crutches and open ring-binders, clustered in front of a wall with a large, cartoonish hole punched through it. The piece is Jesse Darling’s ‘St Jerome in the Wilderness’ (2018). Walking between the sticks and peering into the gap in the wall, you’re confronted with the slapstick tragedy of physical existence. ‘Brazen Serpent’ (2018), a walking-stick coiled to look like a snake, seems to follow you through the “trees”. In trying to protect or medicate ourselves, perhaps we’re in fact acknowledging our own fragility. You can’t avoid the threat implicit within contingency plans. Review by Adam Heardman

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