Viewing articles tagged with 'Drawing'

Cubitt, 8 Angel Mews, London N1 9HH

Hardeep Pandhal: Liar Hydrant

Hardeep Pandhal, Liar Hydrant Mood Board detail, Cubitt Gallery, 2018.

The video works layer lurid cartoons, psychedelic narratives and deadpan rap music; they are accompanied by production drawings and a sculpture. Edmée Lepercq reviews Hardeep Pandhal's solo exhibition at Cubitt.

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

No, No, No, No

No, No, No, No Installation View, 2018

Through the use of verbal and visual puns, the works displayed in ‘No, No, No, No’ convey irony and humour, and challenge the audience by playing with ideas of authorship, making and presenting art, and even appropriating existing artworks. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Lisson Gallery, 138 10th Avenue, New York

Channa Horwitz

Installation view of Channa Horwitz at Lisson Gallery, New York

In the first exhibition at Lisson Gallery, New York, by Californian artist Channa Horwitz, her seminal Sonkinotography series of permutational drawings, created from1968 until her death in 2013, are presented. The exhibition shows an artist who in 1969 had her early compositions dismissed by a critic of the Los Angeles Times as 'Pretty Notations by Valley Housewife' finally receiving the recognition that she deserves. Review by Grace Storey

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Hestercombe Gallery, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton, Somerset TA2 8LG

Odyssean: Topographies

Natasha Rosling and Vilma Luostarinen, Edible Coastlines, 2018.

Beginning high up in the Orkney Isles and journeying to the South West of England, ‘Odyssean: Topographies’ is a cognitive, visual and, at times, physical expedition into hidden and imagined spaces. The culmination of four artists' Orkney-based residencies, the exhibition throws into question the ways in which humans formulate perceptions of nature and place in an era rife with technology. Review by Selina Oakes

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Thomas Bock and Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate

James and Henry Barnard

The first UK-exhibition dedicated to the work of the Birmingham-born convict artist, Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855), at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, is paired with the concurrent exhibition, Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate. This was the the result of a three-year residency spent by the artist at HMP Grendon – Europe’s only entirely therapeutic prison. Despite widely differing careers they both viscerally remind us of the dangers of denying any person a sense of identity. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Cass Sculpture Foundation, New Barn Hill, Goodwood, West Sussex PO18 0QP

The Sleeping Procession

CASS Projects: The Sleeping Procession exhibition. Curated by Sean Steadman and Gabriel Hartley

‘The Sleeping Procession’, a bright and upbeat group exhibition curated by emerging artists Gabriel Hartley and Sean Steadman occupies the gallery with ease. It is a jovial gathering, inspired by the Foundation’s archive of maquettes which the pair have put in dialogue with works by their peers and a number of artists whose work they have found influential. Review by Rebecca Partridge

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National Galleries of Scotland, 73 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DS

NOW | Susan Philipsz, Michael Armitage, Yto Barrada, Kate Davis, Hiwa K, Sarah Rose

Seven Tears, 2016

NOW is the second in a six-part series of exhibitions presented by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art exploring the work of international contemporary artists. It is dominated by a 5 room display of works by the artist Susan Philipsz alongside works by renowned artists Kate Davis, Sarah Rose, Hiwa K, Michael Armitage and Yto Barrada. Review by Rosie Priest

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover Street, London W1S 4NJ

Lee Bul: After Bruno Taut

Lee Bul, After Bruno Taut, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Through complex and elaborate works, Lee Bul portrays failed models that echo the qualities of utopian systems of early twentieth century architecture as well as the politics of totalitarian regimes. The works displayed in ‘After Bruno Taut’ at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac strongly emphasise the excess and fragility of our world, and our failure to control it. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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The Sunday Painter, 117-119 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1XA

Beatriz Olabarrieta: The only way out is in

Beatriz Olabarrieta, The only way out is in, installation view, The Sunday Painter, 2017

In the first instance Beatriz Olabarrieta's artwork is crooked. Like an oversized yoga mat, 'Open relationship (almost failing red)' (2017) is placed askew of the demarcation grooves set by the floorboards. Only just slightly, which gives it a sense of the accidental. The temptation is to correct its placement, though of course the work remains untouched and introduces an exhibition teasingly just short of the definable and the ideal. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Turner Contemporary, Rendezvous, Margate CT9 1HG

Hans Arp: The Poetry of Forms

Installation view of Jean Arp: The Poetry of Forms at Turner Contemporary, Margate. 13 October 2017 - 14 January 2018.

In the first exhibition of Arp’s work in the UK since his death in 1966, Turner Contemporary exhibits a selective retrospective of the multi-linguist’s works and ideas spanning from early Dadaist pieces such as the poem ‘Kaspar ist tot’ to the sculpture, ‘Étoile’, a hollow melting star that marks his grave in Locarno. Review by Evie Ward

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Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Rachel Whiteread

Untitled (One Hundred Spaces), 1995, Resin, Various dimensions

Whiteread has stretched usual architectural proximity. This creates a large void between interior and exterior realms: expressing a psychological distance and complexity through space. Review by Matthew Turner

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Artist Interview: Lubaina Himid

Interview: Lubaina Himid

Lubaina Himid

Ahead of tonight's Turner Prize winner announcement, which she is odds on to win, Cleo Roberts, art historian and research associate at Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, interviewed Lubaina Himid to find out more about her practice, research process and the intricacies of her visual language.

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Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, 1100 Kettner Blvd, San Diego, CA 92101, USA

Memories of Underdevelopment: Art and the Decolonial Turn in Latin America, 1960-1985

Installation view of Memories of Underdevelopment: Art and the Decolonial Turn in Latin America, 1960-1985

Memories of Underdevelopment is set within the context of Latin America during the 1960s to 1980s, a period that coincides with both the apex and unraveling of the developmentalist project in many countries in the region, most notably Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, and Mexico. In contrast to dominant ideologies that guided the modernization process in these countries, Memories of Underdevelopment traces the emergence of a distinct set of artistic practices that questioned the developmentalist rhetoric and proposed alternative forms of cultural production that responded to this situation of cultural and economic dependency.

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