Viewing articles tagged with 'Drawing'

Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke Street, Oxford OX1 1BP

Johanna Unzueta: Tools for Life

Johanna Unzueta: Tools for Life

Anthropologists have long believed that the use and development of tools has played a key role in the evolution of humankind. Tools and their mechanisation have contributed to the advancement of agriculture, industrialisation and modernisation. Over the last two decades, New York-based, Chilean-born artist Johanna Unzueta has explored the impact of these technological advancements on labour and the human condition, particularly in relation to nature. Her new exhibition ‘Tools for Life’, at Modern Art Oxford (temporarily closed), brings together a body of work composed of large-scale felt sculptures, wearable garments, a Super-8 film shot in a Chilean textile factory, a wall mural and a selection of free-standing geometric drawings. Review by Alex White

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BALTIC, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings

Amalia Pica, Yerkish, 2018. Courtesy the artist and Herald Street Gallery. Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art 2019.

The curator of the show, Filipa Ramos, says that the starting point is Deleuze’s text 'Becoming-Animal', but it goes beyond the theory. Deleuze, while writing about Francis Bacon, states that between human and animal, there is a deep identity, a zone of indiscernibility, that is more profound than any sentimental identification. Review by Gulnaz Can

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15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival, TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and other venues

Myths Of the Near Future

Ann Lislegaard, Installation View ENTANGLEMENT, TEA Tenerife

‘Myths of the Near Future’ was the chosen theme and title of the 15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival directed by Laura Vallés and held at TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and various other art venues in the Canary Islands. From the outset, the ambition was to reach out beyond the confines of photography in order to rethink the theory of the image and its limits, the places where it rubs up against other disciplines of knowledge like philosophy, sociology and anthropology. Review by Néstor Delgado Morales

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The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Gabriel Kuri: spending static to save gas

spending static to save gas, 2020, installation view

There is a comforting routine to visiting exhibitions in Dublin’s Douglas Hyde Gallery - you enter the foyer and walk past the main desk to the top of the staircase, which gives a sweeping preview of the work as you descend into the gallery’s main space, your foot hitting the same spot each time. This comfort has been removed by Gabriel Kuri’s radical structural intervention ‘spending static to save gas’ (2020), featured in his exhibition of the same name. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Kristian Day, Broadway Gallery, 2 The Arcade, Letchworth Garden City SG6 3EW

Parade

Chris Alton, After the Revolution They Built an Art School Over the Golf Course, 2017, textiles

The artists in ‘Parade’ are woven together with common threads of narrative and socially engaged themes. In vivid colours and an assortment of textures, the exhibition boasts multi-sensory appeal. Review by Sara Makari-Aghdam

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David Zwirner, 24 Grafton Street, London W1S 4EZ

Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand

Installation views of Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand at David Zwirner London, 22 November 2019 - 19 December 2019.

David Zwirner recently featured ‘The Anchor Hits the Sand’, a solo exhibition by Swedish artist Jockum Nordström. Upon entrance, visitors encounter a collection of Nordström’s watercolour collages. The motifs that comprise the works illustrate Nordström’s imaginative spirit and oeuvre. Each composition is peculiar and ambiguous, characterised by various scenes, with figures who seemingly have no apparent relation to one another. Review by Sheena Carrington

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The Sunday Painter, 117-119 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1XA

Chips and Egg

Milly Thompson, Nor playing the flute, 2015, Oil and acrylic on board, 61 × 51 cm

‘Chips and Egg’ quotes a classic piece of British cinema,’ Shirley Valentine’. The film tells the story of a Liverpool housewife breaking out of her world of domestic cliché to embark on a spontaneous Greek holiday and find love and adventure only to end up in another set of clichés. This is precisely the self-digesting system of cultural production that’s light-heartedly recognised by this exhibition. The success of ‘Chips and Egg’ lies in highlighting the beauty and sincerity in seemingly futile repetition for the sake of care, survival, indulgence and art. Review by Sonja Teszler

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The Mosaic Rooms, Tower House, 226 Cromwell Road, London SW5 0SW

Praneet Soi: Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, Winter in the Kashmir Valley

Praneet Soi: Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, Winter in the Kashmir Valley, The Mosaic Rooms

The exhibition 'Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, winter in the Kashmir Valley’ resembles a travelling diary written by a flâneur-cum-researcher, into territories and histories familiar to the artist Praneet Soi. In response to The Mosaic Rooms commission, the artist decided to travel during June 2019 across the Occupied Palestinian Territories including Golan Heights, Jericho and Hebron, and in Israel, in Haifa, Akka and Tel Aviv. Review by Mihaela Varzari

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Various locations, Coventry

The Twin: Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art

Installation view at The Herbert Art Gallery & Museum featuring Andrew Jackson (l), Parmar & Piper (c) and Anne Forgan (r)

The figure of the twin is one that resonates with the history of Coventry, one of the first cities to form an international partnership, first twinning with Volgograd 75 years ago. The Biennial draws on this theme, showing work from artists based in several of these twinned cities, alongside recent graduates from the area, and both local and international artists. Besides exploring international relations in the current political moment, themes of the Anthropocene, nature and technology, pairing artistic practice and academic research and acts of repetition emerge throughout the exhibitions. Review by Emily Hale

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The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield WF1 5AW

Christina Quarles: In Likeness

 Christina Quarles install shots, copyright Nick Singleton

Entering Christina Quarles’ first European exhibition at The Hepworth Wakefield, the viewer is greeted with a number of large-scale paintings and an architectural intervention, which includes a window revealing further works. Quarles’ arresting paintings depict female bodies that stretch, contort and intertwine. They are ambiguous and only barely legible as bodies, found somewhere in the liminal space between depiction and abstraction. Review by Joshua Lockwood-Moran

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Museum Voorlinden, Buurtweg 90, 2244 AG Wassenaar, Netherlands

Do Ho Suh

Staircase - III

Do Ho Suh’s solo exhibition highlights the artist’s fabric replicas of the places where he once lived. Reproduced at a 1:1 scale and in a range of colours, this well-known mode of his practice not only charts the route Suh’s life has taken, but also creates a presence that is more atmospheric than architectural. Based on residences in Berlin, London, Seoul, and New York City, these markers speak of the evanescence of past experiences and the frailty of memory. Their cumulative effect balances the mnemonic with fact. Review by John Gayer

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Regen Projects, 6750 Santa Monica Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90038, USA

Christina Quarles: But I Woke Jus’ Tha Same

Change'll Come (Eventually)

‘But I Woke Jus’ Tha Same’ is a solo exhibition featuring Christina Quarles’ new paintings and drawings in which she explores how bodies interact in social environments. At first glance, her command of a rich artistic language—gestural and controlled, textured and flat, biomorphic and angular—makes her work immediately intriguing. Review by Vivian Chun-Wei Lin

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Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Geta Brătescu: The Power of the Line

Geta Brătescu, Jocul formelor (Game of Forms), 2010, Collage, drawing on paper, 4 parts, 45 x 60 cm

Hauser & Wirth, working closely with the artist before her death and with Ivan Gallery, has put together a museum-quality exhibition of this remarkable artist’s work. The show draws together pieces from the last decade, a period in which Brătescu’s practice focused on working with the line as a structuring principle. Review by Anna Souter

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tracey Emin A Fortnight of Tears

Tracey Emin, A Fortnight of Tears, White Cube Bermondsey, 6 February - 7 April 2019

The paintings in this exhibition splatter the flesh, blood and mucus palettes of Francis Bacon and Cy Twombly across Egon Schiele’s warped technical accuracy of human anatomy. It’s some of the best painting Emin has done for years and is enough to carry the less potent parts of the exhibition. The neon and the selfies seem to blare some loud but ineloquent kind of intimacy at you, and don’t come near the compositional mastery of the paintings and sculptures. Review by Adam Heardman

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