Viewing articles tagged with 'Group'

National Galleries of Scotland, 73 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DS

NOW | Susan Philipsz, Michael Armitage, Yto Barrada, Kate Davis, Hiwa K, Sarah Rose

Seven Tears, 2016

NOW is the second in a six-part series of exhibitions presented by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art exploring the work of international contemporary artists. It is dominated by a 5 room display of works by the artist Susan Philipsz alongside works by renowned artists Kate Davis, Sarah Rose, Hiwa K, Michael Armitage and Yto Barrada. Review by Rosie Priest

Further reading +

Access Gallery, 222 E Georgia St, Vancouver, BC V6A 1Z7

Some Spontaneous Particulars: Vanessa Brown, Heide Hinrichs, Kathleen Ritter

Some Spontaneous Particulars,  Installation view

Some Spontaneous Particulars presents never-before exhibited work by three artists whose research-based practices have drawn them to the work of historical women artists Marianne Brandt (for Brown), Theresa Hak Kyung Cha (for Hinrichs) and Mina Loy (for Ritter), whose own production and memory has been overlooked or stifled within the art historical canon.

Further reading +

V-A-C Collection, Palazzo delle Zattere, Dorsoduro 1401, Venice

The Electric Comma: V-A-C Collection

Installation view, The Electric Comma

Taking its title from Shannon Ebner’s installation The Electric Comma, the exhibition focuses on shifts in language, perception and understanding in the age of artificial intelligence. Through varied practices and from different backgrounds, participating artists deal with the negotiations between the conscious mind and today’s pervasive learning machine, imagining pathways of exchange between human and nonhuman, ranging from the poetic and intuitive to the algorithmical and analytical.

Further reading +

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, 220 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611, USA

Woman With A Camera

Skatepark

The exhibition Woman with a Camera presents a selection of 18 works from the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago's collection, featuring work by established masters Marina Abramovic, Sophie Calle, Catherine Opie, Laurie Simmons, and Carrie Mae Weems, as well as emerging artists Anne Collier, Xaviera Simmons, and Mickalene Thomas. Together, the women use photography to explore central themes in contemporary photography: rendering the human figure, capturing public and private spaces, and commenting on our media-saturated culture. Other works from the gift will be incorporated into MCA exhibitions throughout the year.

Further reading +

OMR Gallery, Córdoba 100, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

TROIKA: Compression Loss

Installation view, Compression Loss

The works in the exhibition stem from Troika’s continuing interest in the various models and belief systems used to detail and understand the world. Incorporating the opposing frameworks of technological advancement and mythology, Troika’s works investigate how the application of a purely rational and scientific method onto practical life is often at odds with the subjective and unpredictable.

Further reading +

Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, 1100 Kettner Blvd, San Diego, CA 92101, USA

Memories of Underdevelopment: Art and the Decolonial Turn in Latin America, 1960-1985

Installation view of Memories of Underdevelopment: Art and the Decolonial Turn in Latin America, 1960-1985

Memories of Underdevelopment is set within the context of Latin America during the 1960s to 1980s, a period that coincides with both the apex and unraveling of the developmentalist project in many countries in the region, most notably Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, and Mexico. In contrast to dominant ideologies that guided the modernization process in these countries, Memories of Underdevelopment traces the emergence of a distinct set of artistic practices that questioned the developmentalist rhetoric and proposed alternative forms of cultural production that responded to this situation of cultural and economic dependency.

Further reading +

Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

3-Phase

Nicola Singh, Sweet Spot, 2017 – installation view. Commissioned for 3-Phase, a partnership between Jerwood Charitable Foundation, WORKPLACE and Eastside Projects.

For this second edition of '3-Phase', artists Larry Achiampong, Mark Essen and Nicola Singh have been selected by an independent panel to develop and present new works through three exhibition moments. Following the first at Jerwood Space, the artists will exhibit at WORKPLACE Gallery in Gateshead and Eastside Projects in Birmingham in 2018. Review by Giulia Ponzano

Further reading +

Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

States of America

Lee Friedlander, Mt Rushmore, South Dakota, 1969, gelatin-silver print.

Nottingham Contemporary’s ‘States of America’ sweeps across the shifting social and political landscape of the USA between the 1960s and early 1990s, capturing the rise of popular culture and suburbia, declining city centres, the Civil Rights Movement, wealth disparity, urban life and the fading American Dream. Viewed through the lens of seventeen different photographers, we are offered a necessarily prismatic picture of American culture that is particularly compelling given current events. Review by Hannah Newell

Further reading +

Austrian Cultural Forum, 28 Rutland Gate, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1PQ

Emotion + the Tech(no)body

Emotion + The Tech(no)body, Ulla Rauter

Hosted at the Austrian Cultural Forum, the exhibition brings together works which evoke and unveil emotions dealing with technology as a subject or a tool. The show challenges our cultural attachment to data and the relationship of our bodies to technology, offering points of view on artistic practices that on the one hand bring these notions together, and on the other convey the tension within them. Review by Fiorella Lanni

Further reading +

Bonner Kunstverein and Artothek, Hochstadenring 22 D-53119 Bonn Germany

The Policeman´s Beard is Half Constructed: Art in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Installation view, The Policeman's Beard is Half Constructed: Art in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, Bonner Kunstverein 2017

Titled after the first book written by a computer, The Policeman’s Beard is Half Constructed surveys art engaged with the age of artificial intelligence. The exhibition includes both historical and contemporary artworks made between 1961 and 2017. Comprising over 100 works by 36 artists from 14 countries, the exhibition is the largest to be held at the Kunstverein in 30 years.

Further reading +

Castlefield Gallery, 2 Hewitt Street Manchester, M15 4GB

AND A 123

Aand a 123 installation view

The title for Castlefield Gallery’s exhibition, AND A 123, suggests a pace and a child-like playfulness that is experienced throughout this cohesive group show. Review by Eli Regan

Further reading +

Kestle Barton, Manaccan, Helston, Cornwall. TR12 6HU

Togetherness: Notes on Outrage curated by South Kiosk

About Togetherness: Notes on Outrage installation view

In a converted Cornish farmstead situated just ten miles from the southernmost point of mainland Britain, a group show, Togetherness: Notes on Outrage, curated by London gallery, South Kiosk, that started out in London in the summer offers a considered response to – and celebration of – architecture critic Ian Nairn’s 1955 edition of Architectural Review, entitled Outrage. Review by Trevor H. Smith

Further reading +

Various locations, Coventry

Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art

Bermuda Collective, Alcoholism '65

The walk from the station establishes the context for this first biennial: hoardings and lightboxes promote Coventry’s bid to be the UK’s City of Culture in 2021. In parallel the council has promised ten years of support for cultural growth regardless of the bid’s outcome. For artists and curators in the city, here was an opportunity, not just to take stock of what has recently been achieved, the partnerships already instigated, but to begin plotting the parts they will play in the years to come. Review by Kit Webb

Further reading +

The Edge, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY

Parallel (of Life and) Architecture

The edge parallel (of life and architecture) installation view 1

It would be easy to label Parallel (of Life and) Architecture, currently on show at The Edge gallery, Bath, as part of the growing trend for Brutalist revivalism and fanaticism. But far from a familiar fetishisation of the movement, this is exhibition is ambitious, setting out to engage with the ideas of Alison and Peter Smithson, the husband and wife architectural duo who were central to the development of British Brutalism. Review by Stan Portus

Further reading +