Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Lilah Fowler: nth nature

Lilah Fowler: nth nature, 2018

The city is striated into manifold ordered grids that similarly control our movements. The Nevada desert on the other hand, one of the locations Lilah Fowler explored for her show at Assembly Point, has no such boundaries and borders – it has an order more in common with a modulating weather system than any Cartesian geometry. Review by Matthew Turner

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Hazel Brill

Hazel Brill, Woke Up in Spring, 2018, Mixed media video installation, 9 mins. Solo Invites exhibition, 1 March - 8 April 2018.

Hazel Brill’s new video installation ‘Woke Up in Spring’ presents a compendium of media and cultural references that build up a layered picaresque of the artist’s exploration of her environment. Review by Piers Masterson

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Actions. The image of the world can be different

Installation view, Rana Begum

Kettle's Yard in Cambridge re-opens following a multi-million pound redevelopment of its galleries and public spaces and takes this question, and its possible answers, as a starting point. It features the work of 38 practitioners whose works fill the galleries, the on-site historic house and a nearby church, as well as occupying space online and being emblazoned on the uniform of the front of house staff. This exhibition is expansive. Review by Ryan Hughes

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out_sight, GF, 12, Changgyeonggung-ro 35ga-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul, S.Korea

Mitra Saboury: Filthy Middles

Installation view, Mitra Saboury, Filthy Middles, Out_Sight Gallery, Seoul

Cleaning as we know it secures a homogeneous space that is removed of all otherness. However, when Mitra Saboury rubs, flosses, dusts and swipes things in her videos, her body as the subject of cleaning ends up revoltingly contaminated with the filth. Instead of eliminating dirt and grime, Saboury’s body becomes part of the mess. Text by exhibition curator, Jinho Lim.

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Wysing Arts Centre, Fox Rd, Cambridge CB23 2TX

more of an avalanche

Wysing Arts Centre, more of an avalanche, installation view, 2018

The exhibition takes the most ubiquitously right wing of pejorative terms – “snowflake” – as its conceptual springboard: the works here reclaim this insult from the political right by embracing and unabashedly exploring it. Empathy for your fellow humans and a willingness to speak up against pernicious injustice are embraced as strengths to celebrate, rather than mocked as signs of hypersensitivity and an inability to cope with ‘real life’. Review by Helena Haimes

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Art in General, 145 Plymouth St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA

Zach Blas: Contra-Internet

Zach Blas, Jubilee 2033 (film still) 2018. Commissioned by Gasworks, London; Art in General, New York; and MU, Eindhoven

Zach Blas’ debut US solo show, Contra-Internet, at Art in General, New York, is a 28-minute long film, ‘Jubilee 2033’, inspired by the opening sequence of Derek Jarman’s seminal queer punk film ‘Jubilee’ (1978). Blas’ film imagines the jubilee of the internet in 2033 and evidences his broader endeavour ‘to explore contemporary technology in relationship to feminism and queerness’. Review by Grace Storey

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Oriel Davies Gallery, The Park, Newtown, SY16 2NZ

Freya Dooley: Speakable Things

Freya Dooley, Speakable Things, Oriel Davies, 2018

‘Speakable Things’, Freya Dooley’s newly commissioned sound and moving image work for Litmus at Oriel Davies, is installed within a room painted a deep pink comparable to the inside of a mouth. It is an intimate colour for an intimate space, measuring less than 2m². The mouth repeatedly appears throughout ‘Speakable Things’, as blank space interrupts out-of-sync close ups and scenes of wild landscape. Freya is interested in the voice as something in-between inside and outside, sound and language, thought and body. Text by Litmus Curator Louise Hobson

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Margaret Salmon: Circle

Installation view, Margaret Salmon: Circle, Tramway, Glasgow, 2018

American Glasgow-based artist Margaret Salmon’s filmic, atmospheric and carefully rendered installation, sensitive to the nuances of people, the subtleties of places and objects (and her relationships to them) is housed in Tramway’s immense principal space. It renders the space quieter than normal, in half-light – a place for a rare, esoteric experience. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Hestercombe Gallery, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton, Somerset TA2 8LG

Odyssean: Topographies

Natasha Rosling and Vilma Luostarinen, Edible Coastlines, 2018.

Beginning high up in the Orkney Isles and journeying to the South West of England, ‘Odyssean: Topographies’ is a cognitive, visual and, at times, physical expedition into hidden and imagined spaces. The culmination of four artists' Orkney-based residencies, the exhibition throws into question the ways in which humans formulate perceptions of nature and place in an era rife with technology. Review by Selina Oakes

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Thomas Bock and Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate

James and Henry Barnard

The first UK-exhibition dedicated to the work of the Birmingham-born convict artist, Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855), at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, is paired with the concurrent exhibition, Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate. This was the the result of a three-year residency spent by the artist at HMP Grendon – Europe’s only entirely therapeutic prison. Despite widely differing careers they both viscerally remind us of the dangers of denying any person a sense of identity. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Chelsea Space, 16 John Islip St, London SW1P 4JU

Ian Giles: After BUTT

Installation view, Ian Giles: After BUTT. Image courtesy Ian Giles and Chelsea Space, copyright Rob Harris

When does a cultural artefact – a magazine, a film, an artwork – cease to be considered what we might call ‘contemporary’ and enter the realm of the historical? A minute ago? Yesterday? The turn of the millennium? Once its creator/s have passed away? Not until it starts to have what might be called a legacy? Helena Haimes reviews ‘After BUTT’ by Ian Giles, new film currently showing at London’s Chelsea Space.

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Pump House Gallery, Battersea Park, London SW11 4NJ

Sriwhana Spong: a hook but no fish

Sriwhana Spong, a hook but no fish installation view, 2017.

Sophie Risner reviews a presentation of work by Sriwhana Spong which takes the work of twelfth century female mystic named Hildegard von Bingen as its central reference point.

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Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice installation view

Susan Philipsz’s work has often been described as a form of ‘sound sculpture’ that you hear long before you see it. The exact significance behind A Single Voice is not perfectly clear. Philipsz has pointed out that the apocalyptic story of Aniara holds just as much relevance today as when the poem was first written in 1956 (arguably more), and the mournful quality of the deconstructed violin combined with the player’s stark isolation as she accompanies an invisible, inaudible orchestra through her headphones, could almost be read as a last chilling goodbye to the human race as it peters into extinction. Review by Sara Jaspan

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