Viewing articles tagged with 'Video'

Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

David Ferrando Giraut: The Accursed Stare

David Ferrando Giraut, CATOPTROPHILIA, 2013. Installation view.

David Ferrando Giraut’s recent works weave a neon path through progressive economic theories and 17,000 years of image-making, arriving at the present day clad in Louboutin and dripping in gold. Review by Jack Smurthwaite

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Richard Mosse: Incoming

Still frame from Incoming, 2015-2016. Three screen video installation by Richard Mosse in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost.

In ‘Incoming’, the other is played by the European state apparatus. In their helmets, suits and protective gear, those that meet and interact with the refugees are rendered alien in the thermographic camera’s aesthetic. Mosse’s camera is able to present the true inhumanity of the crisis by inverting the roles of the migrant and those enforcing the violent borders. Review by David Lee Astley

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Auto Italia, 44 Bonner Rd, London E2 9JS

Feral Kin

Feral Kin, Auto Italia South East (2017). Installation detail (left to right): Billy Howard Price, Taut Pupil (2017). Digital print. Jaakko Pallasvuo, MASK (2016) written by Huw Lemmey & Jaakko Pallasvuo. Single channel video.

‘Feral Kin’ is London’s first glimpse into Auto Italia’s collaborative, ongoing project ‘On Coping’. From Johannesburg to Copenhagen, Auto Italia has brought ‘On Coping’ across the world. Working locally with artists in each city, the project seeks to unpack the artist precariat by developing systems of growth through collaboration. Review by Ashley Janke

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SE8 Gallery, 171 Deptford High Street, London SE8 3NU

João Biscainho: Future Nothingness

Rock Interior (2012-2014) and Uncanny River (the Crossing) (2014-2015)

In ‘Future Nothingness’ material and materiality are merged together by Portuguese artist João Biscainho in a well-choreographed display. The exhibition presents a series of works from 2013 – 2015 that take us into a series of marine references, using fluids as the main vehicle to transport the meaning of the works in the semi-dark space of the gallery. Review by Cristina Ramos González

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Decad, Gneisenaustraße 52, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Christopher Petit: In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone

Christopher Petit: In What's Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone, installation view at Decad, 201

Novelist and filmmaker Christopher Petit presents ‘In What’s Missing, Is Where Love Has Gone’. Using a pixelated image of the late David Bowie as a stimulus, the four works presented are an examination of a quiet voyeurism that speaks to internal, often inexpressible observations surrounding popular, repetitive images. Review by Candice Nembhard

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ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

As the main player in a game of shifting dynamics of authority, Boyce enables a fairly unpredictable performative situation but avoids direct involvement in the action. Later on, the artist reshapes the remains of the past event, so to create an installation that aims to become a space for new experience. Review by Chiara Cartuccia

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Wysing Arts Centre, Fox Road, Bourn, Cambridge, CB23 2TX

All Channels Open

Lawrence Lek, FABRICK, 2017. Two video loops, 12 min, Stereo sound, Architectural model, Lasercut MDF, HD Screens, Raspberry Pis, LED Strip. 65 x 25 x 15 cm.

‘All Channels Open’ is similar to a compilation played within a subdued, minimally lit dance floor. An imaginable mic is passed to each artist in an effort to amplify her or his voice and position in the space. Review by Jaime Marie Davis

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Jamie Crewe: Female Executioner

Jamie Crewe, Female Executioner, 2017. Installation view.

‘Female Executioner’ translates the 1884 work, ‘Monsieur Venus: A Materialist Novel’, into compact visual sequences theatrically staged across the sparse Gasworks gallery. Review by Ashley Janke

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Frith Street Gallery, Soho Square (60 Frith Street), London

Adrian Paci / Giuliana Racco: Another Place

The Guardians

Informed by Adrian Paci's personal history of exile from Albania to Milan in 1997 during an armed uprising, he is characteristically drawn to dislocating the viewer and exploring the ambiguities of space, and the intersection between fact, fiction, reality and fantasy. His work has found a suitable counterpart in Giuliana Racco. Review by Cleo Roberts

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Amie Siegel: Strata

Amie Siegel, Quarry, 2015. HD video, colour and sound. Exhibition view South London Gallery, 2017

Siegel probes ideas of value, wealth, attraction and symbolism through her work, presenting a layering of geological and allegorical strata which gives the exhibition its title. Review by Jillian Knipe

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J Hammond Projects, Unit 2B2 Bomb Factory, Boothby Road, London N19 4AJ

Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight)?

Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight) J HAMMOND PROJECTS

The objects we choose to accumulate and surround ourselves with represent a manicured veneer, and what we throw away is more revealing. Isn’t it more exciting to think about how someone would rather not be perceived? Liam Hess considers group exhibition 'Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight)?'

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Breese Little, Unit 1, 249 - 253 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 6JY

Parallax scrolling

Parallax scrolling, Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague, Installation View

‘Parallax scrolling’ is an exhibition that proposes a series of visual tactics by artists Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague. These invite viewers to engage with perception and perspective by utilising simple optical devices, drawing our attention to the process of representation. Review by Cristina Ramos González

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

Tropical Hangover

Tropical Hangover, installation view.

In the hot, damp climate of the rainforest, no sooner than an animal or plant dies, it begins to decay, feeding the maggots and soil from which new life grows. The tropics are an uncompromisingly ugly environment. The notion of nature’s immutable beauty is a human construction; one, as Tenderpixel’s group show ‘Tropical Hangover’ reveals, perpetuated by art. Henry Broome reviews

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