Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Tschabalala Self

Tschabalala Self, Tramway 2017

American artist Tshabalala Self's work is concerned with the iconographic significance of the black female body in contemporary culture, its fantasies and misrepresentations and their concurrent emotional, physical and psychological impacts. Review by Alex Hetherington

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ALMA ZEVI, Salizzada San Samuele, 3357, 30124 Venice, Italy

John Smith: Films in Sheep’s Clothing

John Smith, Films in Sheep's Clothing, Om, 1986, ALMA ZEVI, 2017

In an increasingly earnest art world, visitors to Alma Zevi’s gallery off the main sway of the Grand Canal can take relief in the comedic value of mistranslation and mistaken identity. John Smith’s films - showcased for the first time in Italy in Zevi’s solo exhibition – are arranged into an artful, tightly curated presentation, and span Smith’s forty-year involvement at the frontline of British conceptual film-making. Review by Olivia Paterson

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Hales Gallery, Tea Building, 7 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA

Carolee Schneemann: More Wrong Things

Carolee Schneemann, More Wrong Things, 2017, Hales London

Recently awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Carolee Schneemann is best known for her innovations in feminist and performance art. Yet Schneemann’s decades-spanning multimedia practice has also consistently questioned the personal and cultural politics of violence and mourning, which the eloquent recent works in the exhibition continue to examine. Review by Carlos Kong

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CHEWDAY'S,139 Lambeth Walk, London SE11 6EE

Mathis Gasser: The Dark Forest

Mathis Gasser, The Dark Forest, installation view

Mathis Gasser transfers on to his canvas a digital diagram from the online forum deviantart.com charting all spacecraft featured throughout the history of science fiction, in novels, comics, video games. As such, they are adapted to a type of navigation that can only be theorised and never actually practised. They are the purest form of vessel, and so embody the concept of a ship. Review by Carolina Mostert

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VITRINE, London, 15 Bermondsey Square, London SE1 3UN

Kate Cooper: Ways to Scale

Kate Cooper, Ways to Scale, Installation View 2017

The narrative aspect of the image is ambiguous, with much of what’s happening not revealed by the framing, but nonetheless we can find a young red-haired woman dressed in pristine white to match the white medical environment, some unidentified tech and the tendrils of a jellyfish. Tessa Norton reviews

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Grand Union, Minerva Works, 158 Fazeley St, Birmingham B5 5RS

Seecum Cheung: The Dutch Window

Seecum Cheung, The Dutch Window, 2017.

In a time when saboteurs lurk at home and gossips snipe from afar, some reach for the shutters and draw them fast. Better to be kept in the dark, it’s presumed, than to risk the prying of the ill-intentioned. Britain pulls down the blinds. The Channel has rarely felt wider. Kit Webb reviews Seecum Cheung's 'The Dutch Window'.

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Jürgen Partenheimer: Lichtschwarm

Jürgen Partenheimer, Lichtschwarm, White Cube Bermondsey, 28 April - 18 June 2017

Jürgen Partenheimer's works hover in a peculiar location. Somewhere specifically approximate. In his first London exhibition, ‘Lichtschwarm’ (Light Swarm), Partenheimer presents his continuing and illusive conversation between art of itself and of its circumstances. Jillian Knipe reviews

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Sprüth Magers, Oranienburger Straße 18, 10178 Berlin

Pamela Rosenkranz: She Has No Mouth

Installation view, Pamela Rosenkranz: She Has No Mouth

The Swiss artist Pamela Rosenkranz is interested in the invisible phenomena that affect the material world. Behind a sensual aesthetic, her work is subtly subversive. Rosenkranz often draws from consumer research, notably the effect of toxoplasmosis, a parasite said to infect 30% of the world population and researched for influencing a series of human behaviours, including fear, spending habits, physical attraction and most relevant to the concept of her inaugural solo exhibition at Sprüth Magers Berlin, human fondness for cats. Review by Anaïs Castro

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Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Mat Collishaw: Thresholds

Thresholds, early test visualisation

In the context of Photo London, the artist has brought together the vanguard of Victorian visual technology with current developments in virtual reality programming. Review by Cleo Roberts

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Rowing, 3 Leighton Place, London NW5 2QL

Rory Pilgrim

Rory Pilgrim, Software Garden, installation view

Pilgrim’s exhibition is based on the idea that technology, like ecology, can facilitate beneficent exchanges between its users. The show’s main feature is a short film (22 minutes) also called ‘Software Garden’ (2017), which takes the structure of the diverse environment of a garden by combining work from a number of collaborators. Review by Henry Broome

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Hannah Barry Gallery, 4 Holly Grove, Peckham, London SE15 5DF

Oliver Griffin

H Demonstrations of Patterns in Flow What do you expect from your surfaces. A philosophy of Bicycle MotoCross (BMX) and everything. Installation view.

On the wall, hung off-centre in a 3 x 3 grid that recalls the conventional arrangement of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s water towers and grain elevators, are nine risograph prints. They belong to a series of photographs taken by Griffin at a flatland BMX competition in 2015, not of the riders or their performances, but of the streaks whorled by skidding tyres. Review by Kit Webb

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Spike Island, 133 Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6UX

Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Common Ground

Andrea Luka Zimmerman: Common Ground, installation view at Spike Island, 2017

‘Common Ground’ showcases the importance of place in Andrea Luka Zimmerman's practice. At the centre of the exhibition is Zimmerman’s film ‘Estate, a Reverie’ (2015). It tracks the drawn out closure of the Haggerston Estate in East London, where Zimmerman lived for 18 years. Review by Helen Cobby

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AirSpace Gallery, 4 Broad Street, City Centre, Stoke-on-Trent ST1 4HL

Victoria Lucas: Lay of the Land (and other such myths)

Victoria Lucas, Lay of the Land (and other such myths), installation view at AirSpace Gallery

The spectral colours of ‘Psychedelic Western #3’ (2015) provide a rich exhibition excerpt – its vibrant and effervescent depictions of the Alabama hills are repeated in the show's wall-sized prints and theatrical screens. A feminine sigh welcomes you into the space, while deceptively light boulders – made from layers of polystyrene, fibreglass and jesmonite – catch your eye as they glisten under the gallery's spotlights. Selina Oakes reviews

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Turf Projects, Keeley Rd, Croydon CR0 1TF

Paul Schneider: Ways of Seeing

Installation view, Ways of Seeing at Turf Projects

A simplicity of form is the essence of ‘Ways of Seeing’, Paul Schneider’s solo show at Turf Projects in East Croydon. Screen Beans, the now extinct graphics of the 90s Microsoft Office populate the gallery space of Turf Projects over and over again creating an immersive virtual experience. Review by Zoe Marden

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