Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Catharine Clark Gallery, 248 Utah Street, San Francisco, CA, 94103

Chris Doyle: Hollow and Swell

Hollow and Swell, Installation view

Hollow and Swell, an exhibition of new animations and watercolors by Chris Doyle. The works mark the conclusion of Doyle's extended response to Hudson River School painter Thomas Cole's iconic five part series, The Course of Empire (1833 - 1836), which depicts a single landscape as it transitions from a pastoral setting to a dense metropolis that finally, through conflict and overpopulation, deteriorates to a site of overgrown ruins. Doyle's work considers the impacts of digital technology on a rapidly proliferating cultural landscape.

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Isabella Bortolozzi Galerie, Schöneberger Ufer 61 10785 Berlin, Germany

James Richards: Mouth Room / Crumb Mahogany

James Richards, Mouth Room, 2017, courtesy the artist and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin

There are no images or videos to look at – only the nakedness of the sounds flooding the floor. Vibrations seemingly emerge from nowhere, as suspended spirits floating then dissipating in the air like icy breath. Review by Giulia Ponzano

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University of Brighton Gallery, 154-155 Edward Street, Brighton BN2 0JG

Natasha Caruana: Timely Tale

Natasha Caruana, from the series, Timely Tale, 2017

Based on the theme of excess, ‘Timely Tale’ invites the audience into the private world of the artist’s mother, Penny. Caruana examines the difficulties of her mother’s life, as she deals with decisions regarding her health, her love of expensive designer clothes and the search for ‘Mr Right’. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Institute for Contemporary Art Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Drive Boston, MA 02210

Dana Schutz

Big Wave

Dana Schutz is among the foremost painters of her generation and is part of a group of artists leading a revival of painting today. Her distinct combination of figuration and abstraction, expressive colour palette, and her use of imagined and hypothetical scenarios are unique among her contemporaries. The artist’s work captures the frenzy, tension, vulnerability, and struggle of life today, as her subjects actively manage, even fight, both the limitations of the canvas and their depicted environments.

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Bonington Gallery, Nottingham Trent University, Bonington building, Dryden Street, Nottingham, UK, NG1 4GG

It’s Our Playground: Artificial Sensibility

Installation view

A solo exhibition of new work by Paris-based artist duo It’s Our Playground (IOP), comprised of Camille Le Houezec and Jocelyn Villemont. Artificial Sensibility continues the duo’s ongoing reflection on artificial intelligence – when technology mimics human cognitive behaviour. Artificial Sensibility reveals a hybrid learning process of automated principles of recognition and basic human methods of education.

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Alexander Gray Associates, 510 West 26 Street, New York NY 10001

Polly Apfelbaum: The Potential of Women

  Polly Apfelbaum: The Potential of Women, installation view, Alexander Gray Associates (2017)

In Polly Apfelbaum’s first show at Alexander Gray Associates, The Potential of Women, the artist borrows both the title and central design symbiology from the decades-old symposium’s accompanying publication. Her appropriation of this essentialist feminine image, denoted as such by the suggestion of a bob haircut, signals a further call to equity while contemplating the scope of modern identity politics itself. Review by Torey Akers

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The Midland Hotel, Marine Road West, Morecambe LA4 4BU

Jenny Steele: This Building for Hope

Not so Nautical A Divide, print on vinyl banner, 2017 artwork and beach

It's rare to find an exhibition which leaves viewers feeling uplifted, sentimental and optimistic. More often than not, artists hotfoot it past nostalgia and the seemingly passé. Manchester-based practitioner Jenny Steele reinvigorates our acquaintance with the past: in this case, with the ‘Seaside Moderne’ and its transatlantic journey between Miami and Morecambe. Review by Selina Oakes

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Siobhan Davies, Studios 85, St George's Road, London SE1 6ER

Katinka Bock: Mesonya/

Katinka Bock, Mesonya/, 2017. Siobhan Davies Dance.

As you enter the Roof Studio at Siobhan Davies Dance, you encounter a subtle array of objects distributed seemingly randomly across the space. Some are objects you might expect to encounter in this setting; a slightly dishevelled rolled black foam mat and an electric heater, for example. Others seems more alien, like the floppy, malleable looking ceramic that hangs over the side of the heater and the small video work propped up in the corner. All of course belong here in the context of Katinka Bock’s exhibition ‘Mesonya/’, part of the newly launched ‘Traces Commissions’ programme. Review by Amy Jones

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Project Narrative Informant, Morley House, 26 Holborn Viaduct, The City of London, London EC1A 2AQ

Juliana Huxtable

Installation view, Project Narrative Informant

In her first UK solo show, Huxtable's focus shifts to what covers the bodies of others. The exhibition is centered around ten panels of text displaying fragments from a larger narrative written by Huxtable. Threaded through the story of a young blonde who falls in with a crowd of skinheads in London, is an analysis of struggles over the meaning of the white skinhead aesthetic: bomber jackets, Fred Perry, Ben Sherman. Review by Kevin Brazil

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Kurimanzutto, San Miguel Chapultepec, 11850 Ciudad de México

Anri Sala: All of a Tremble

Installation view of All of a Tremble

Kurimanzutto's second exhibition of Anri Sala, where the artist explores the relationship between image construction and the physicality of sound. The exhibition illustrates how sound becomes a means to investigate the relationship between form and formation, process and production, being and becoming.

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Simon Lee Gallery, 12 Berkeley Street, London, W1J 8DT

Jeff Elrod

Installation view

At a time when the slippages between our own real and virtual, Jeff Elrod exhibits a series of hybrid images that incorporate analogue techniques into experiments in digital and print media, and explore the relationship between hand-painted and digitally created mark-making.

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Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, 6 Heddon Street, London W1B 4BT

Uwe Henneken: The teachings of the Transhistorical Flamingo

Uwe Henneken, The teachings of the Transhistorical Flamingo, solo exhibition, Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London (2017)

At first sight, there is no strict theme linking the series of works by Uwe Henneken exhibited at Pippy Houldsworth Gallery. They do not belong to a single series, the subject matter shifts from bestial creatures to human figures, from magical settings to surreal landscapes. Carolina Mostert responds to the exhibition

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Grand Union, 19 Minerva Works, Fazeley Street, Birmingham B5 5RS

Susie Green: Pleasure is a Weapon

Susie Green, Pleasure is a Weapon, 2017

Weaving in and out of sweaty bodies with a collection of singing, dancing, vaping and harp playing are Susie Green and Rory Pilgrim (together The Brilliant State.) The audience track both artists around the space (being careful not to get tangled in the trailing rope of ‘Slow Burn’ as Pilgrim and Green tenderly dress and undress each other to a mixture of choral, dance and pop music. Review by Amy Jones

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The Fruitmarket Gallery, 45 Market St, Edinburgh EH1 1DF

Jac Leirner: Add It Up

Jac Leirner, Add It Up, installation view The Fruitmarket Gallery 2017.

Leirner’s works frequently organise and repurpose slight ephemera into a surprising coalescence. Whilst the career-wide spectrum of activity on display successfully demonstrates the consistent concerns within her oeuvre, the volume of works within this cross-section seems at odds with their essential simplicity, which at times is perhaps diluted in the two satiated galleries. Review by Nathan Anthony

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