Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Hazel Brill

Hazel Brill, Woke Up in Spring, 2018, Mixed media video installation, 9 mins. Solo Invites exhibition, 1 March - 8 April 2018.

Hazel Brill’s new video installation ‘Woke Up in Spring’ presents a compendium of media and cultural references that build up a layered picaresque of the artist’s exploration of her environment. Review by Piers Masterson

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Cordova, Carrer de Portugalete, 15, 08014 Barcelona, Spain

Siera Hyte: Honey Week

Installation view, Siera Hyte: Honey Week, Cordova Gallery

Inspired by ‘The Butterfly’s Evil Spell’ (1920), Federico Garcia Lorca’s first ever play, Sierra Hyte’s ‘Honey Week’ is an invitation to participate in an almost theatrical setting in which humans, animals and creatures alike are welcome to partake of the space. Review by Marta Faria

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Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5 - 9 Temple Bar, Dublin 2, Ireland

Katrina Palmer: The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier

Katrina Palmer, The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier, 2018, Installation view, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Her two-tone and inverted printing, combined with these notations, help turn the map into a celestial chart for navigating the tale. Along with this map, Palmer presents a pair of audio recordings, featuring a ‘silent’ reading room within the gallery, circus tunes, sampled music, as well as a dual voice recording. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Museum Voorlinden, Buurtweg 90, 2244 AG Wassenaar, The Netherlands

Martin Puryear

Martin Puryear 2018 Voorlinden Museum installation view

The arrangement of the Voorlinden Museum’s current exhibition, Martin Puryear, surprises and makes it a delight to behold. Whereas the first half of the presentation is dominated by polychromed sculptures, natural wood surfaces predominate in the second half. A key feature of the layout is that it eschews a chronological ordering which urges viewers to seek out aspects that highlight alternate paths of development. Review by John Gayer

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out_sight, GF, 12, Changgyeonggung-ro 35ga-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul, S.Korea

Mitra Saboury: Filthy Middles

Installation view, Mitra Saboury, Filthy Middles, Out_Sight Gallery, Seoul

Cleaning as we know it secures a homogeneous space that is removed of all otherness. However, when Mitra Saboury rubs, flosses, dusts and swipes things in her videos, her body as the subject of cleaning ends up revoltingly contaminated with the filth. Instead of eliminating dirt and grime, Saboury’s body becomes part of the mess. Text by exhibition curator, Jinho Lim.

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Maureen Paley, 21 Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Kaye Donachie: Silent As Glass

Kaye Donachie, Silent As Glass, exhibition view, Maureen Paley, London 2018

Over the course of her career, Donachie’s work has developed from group depictions of nymph-like youths in a variety of natural settings, including campfires and caves, and hinting at tribal undertones in warm earthy colours, to the caged, closely framed portraits of women in domestic surroundings, even if these are only suggested, we see today. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Pi Artworks, 55 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EG

Ipek Duben: in via incognita

Installation view: Ipek Duben, in via incognita, 2018.

“We were human beings once”; “Now he could start a new life”. These are two separate sentences from testimonials scrolling down on a large projection in Pi Artworks London’s back wall. The rest of the exhibition ‘in via incognita’ by Ipek Duben consists of what that semicolon represents: the in-between of having been human once and the possibility of starting a new life. Text by Gulnaz Can

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Art in General, 145 Plymouth St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA

Zach Blas: Contra-Internet

Zach Blas, Jubilee 2033 (film still) 2018. Commissioned by Gasworks, London; Art in General, New York; and MU, Eindhoven

Zach Blas’ debut US solo show, Contra-Internet, at Art in General, New York, is a 28-minute long film, ‘Jubilee 2033’, inspired by the opening sequence of Derek Jarman’s seminal queer punk film ‘Jubilee’ (1978). Blas’ film imagines the jubilee of the internet in 2033 and evidences his broader endeavour ‘to explore contemporary technology in relationship to feminism and queerness’. Review by Grace Storey

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SCULPTURE AT/VITRINE Bermondsey Square

Charlie Godet Thomas: Cloud Study

Charlie Godet Thomas, Cloud Study, 2017. Commission for SCULPTURE AT Bermondsey Square, London.

Public sculpture usually dominates its surrounds; they are alien objects that often attempt to improve an area by shifting our focus away from it. Conversely, Charlie Godet Thomas’ ‘Cloud Study’, commissioned by SCULPTURE AT and located in Bermondsey Square, is a different species; it blends into the language of the street and manipulates it like a virus, deforming common visual cues and the messages they usually transmit. A sign, for example, is supposed to be read easily, but Thomas’ is ambiguous, and he tells us about our environment instead of distracting from it. Review by Matthew Turner

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Andreas Gursky

Installation image, Andreas Gursky at Hayward Gallery 25 January - 22 April 2018

Gursky captures the next step in the evolution of our sense of resolution, a way of seeing beyond increasing levels of detail, one which constantly flips back and fourth between the detail and the overview, perhaps imprinted in us as we zoom in and zoom out when using Google maps – in fractions of a second we can travel from our own home to the scale of the whole world and back again. Review by Matthew Turner

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Museo Rufino Tamayo, Paseo de la Reforma 51, Bosque de Chapultepec, Bosque de Chapultepec I Secc, 11580 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans, Museo Tamayo, installation view, 2018

The achievement of Wyn Evan’s show at the Museo Tamayo is to take an architectural space; equal parts gallery and auditorium, and to bring these identities together. On one side is the visual allure of the neon, a medium which seems to endlessly delight, on the other, is the music of nature and humanity; a concert exists between them. Review by Elliott Burns

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Oriel Davies Gallery, The Park, Newtown, SY16 2NZ

Freya Dooley: Speakable Things

Freya Dooley, Speakable Things, Oriel Davies, 2018

‘Speakable Things’, Freya Dooley’s newly commissioned sound and moving image work for Litmus at Oriel Davies, is installed within a room painted a deep pink comparable to the inside of a mouth. It is an intimate colour for an intimate space, measuring less than 2m². The mouth repeatedly appears throughout ‘Speakable Things’, as blank space interrupts out-of-sync close ups and scenes of wild landscape. Freya is interested in the voice as something in-between inside and outside, sound and language, thought and body. Text by Litmus Curator Louise Hobson

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming

Installation view of Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming, Camden Arts Centre, 2018.

Rhythm defines Giorgio Griffa’s work. Throughout the Camden Arts Centre’s gallery spaces, from his earliest, late 1960s work to his more recent output, his bright, repeated gestures mark the raw canvases in sequences and patterns. The rhythmic quality is emphasised by the folds of his unstretched canvases, starkly visible, which segment the surfaces of the paintings into something like a score. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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