Viewing articles tagged with 'Solo'

The Sunday Painter, 117-119 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1XA

Beatriz Olabarrieta: The only way out is in

Beatriz Olabarrieta, The only way out is in, installation view, The Sunday Painter, 2017

In the first instance Beatriz Olabarrieta's artwork is crooked. Like an oversized yoga mat, 'Open relationship (almost failing red)' (2017) is placed askew of the demarcation grooves set by the floorboards. Only just slightly, which gives it a sense of the accidental. The temptation is to correct its placement, though of course the work remains untouched and introduces an exhibition teasingly just short of the definable and the ideal. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Turner Contemporary, Rendezvous, Margate CT9 1HG

Hans Arp: The Poetry of Forms

Installation view of Jean Arp: The Poetry of Forms at Turner Contemporary, Margate. 13 October 2017 - 14 January 2018.

In the first exhibition of Arp’s work in the UK since his death in 1966, Turner Contemporary exhibits a selective retrospective of the multi-linguist’s works and ideas spanning from early Dadaist pieces such as the poem ‘Kaspar ist tot’ to the sculpture, ‘Étoile’, a hollow melting star that marks his grave in Locarno. Review by Evie Ward

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Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Gogolevsky Blvd 10/2, Moscow, Russia

Image Diplomacy: Vladislav Shapovalov

Image Diplomacy

V-A-C Foundation presents Image Diplomacy, the fourth and final exhibition in the framework of the experimental programme Carte Blanche, in which the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA) invites art institutions to implement their own curatorial initiatives. Curated by V-A-C Foundation’s Anna Ilchenko, Image Diplomacy is the first solo exhibition for Milan based Russian artist Vladislav Shapovalov. The exhibition focuses on highlighting aspects of how the political vision of the mid-20th century was constructed also thanks to landmark exhibitions.

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Danielle Arnaud,123 Kennington Road London SE11 6SF

Louisa Fairclough: A Song Cycle for the Ruins of a Psychiatric Unit

Louisa Fairclough, A Rose, 2017.

Unnamed psychic catastrophe is a constant shadow in the work of Louisa Fairclough. Her third solo exhibition at Danielle Arnaud is close and claustrophobic: a shuttered room, a dead fireplace, where daylight plays weakly through small cracks. A web of cables litter the floor, threatening entanglement, disaster, the threshold of the machine. Review by Rowan Lear

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Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

Yoshinori Niwa: That Language Sounds Like a Language

Yoshinori Niwa, That Language Sounds Like a Language, installation view, Edel Assanti

For Yoshinori Niwa's second solo show at Edel Assanti, the Japanese artist presents a series of video works and installations that shine a light on the complex relationship between countries, between governments and their citizens, and between objects and the past. Review by Bobby Jewell

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Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Rachel Whiteread

Untitled (One Hundred Spaces), 1995, Resin, Various dimensions

Whiteread has stretched usual architectural proximity. This creates a large void between interior and exterior realms: expressing a psychological distance and complexity through space. Review by Matthew Turner

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OMR Gallery, Córdoba 100, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

TROIKA: Compression Loss

Installation view, Compression Loss

The works in the exhibition stem from Troika’s continuing interest in the various models and belief systems used to detail and understand the world. Incorporating the opposing frameworks of technological advancement and mythology, Troika’s works investigate how the application of a purely rational and scientific method onto practical life is often at odds with the subjective and unpredictable.

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Beth Kettel

Beth Kettel, The Mist of a Pessimist, 2017. Live performance as part of Zabludowicz Collection Invites solo exhibition.

It’s a game show but unlike any you’ve ever seen. Three contestants file wordlessly onto the small stage— animal, human and machine. Familiar and strange, they face the audience. The animal wears a mask, detailed enough to identify it but vague enough to remain unspecific. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Jemma Egan: Turning to Dust

Turning to Dust, 2017, Jemma Egan. Installation View

For this outing Jemma Egan displays five works unpacking the narrative of a wellness industry which is fast bedding down as a canonical part of our postmodern obsession with the self. Review by Sophie Risner

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Matthew Marks Gallery, 523 W 24th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Gary Hume: Mum

Ripe

Matthew Marks is pleased to announce Gary Hume: Mum, the next exhibition in his gallery at 522 West 22nd Street. This body of work focuses on a range of subjects, but at its core is a suite of highly personal paintings about memory and loss. Hume’s mother is 86 years old and suffers from dementia. And while the ostensible subjects of many of the new paintings are flowers, their titles — Mourning, Spent, Blind — reflect Hume’s thoughts of her.

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Nathalie Du Pasquier: Other Rooms

 Installation view of Nathalie Du Pasquier: Other Rooms at Camden Arts Centre, 2017.

Self-described as a painter of still lives ‘who makes her own models’ – carefully colour toned, modular, geometric constructions – Du Pasquier has taken two gallery rooms as her field of composition for a new body of work that comes together as a comprehensive, if many sided, installation. Review by Hannah Newell

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Calvert 22, 22 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP

Dmitri Prigov: Theatre of Revolutionary Action

Dimitri Prigov. Theatre of Revolutionary Action, Installation view, 2017.

‘Russia,’ a 2004 media-opera, like much of Prigov’s work that spans drawing, installation, performance, poetry and sculpture tests the limits of language and meaning, while exploring the complex legacy of Russia’s socialist project and its eventual unravelling. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Hannah Black: Some Context

Hannah Black, The Situation (2017). Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery.

Articulation and destruction, ambiguity and obligation, specificity and dissolution, singularity and collectivity – their various interchanges and struggles, become descriptors for Hannah Black’s ‘Some Context’. Review by Alex Bennett

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DHC/ART Foundation for Contemporary Art, 451 Rue Saint Jean, Montréal, QC H2Y 2R5

Bill Viola: Naissance à rebours

Still from Ascension 4

The presentation at DHC/ART brings together a collection of video works by artist Bill Viola. Four flat panel video works as well as a projection piece are presented alongside Viola's most recent major installation, Inverted Birth (2014). This monumental projection depicts the five stages of awakening through a series of violent transformations, exploring the very nature of our existence: life, death, birth, and rebirth.

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