Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

FOLD Gallery, 158 New Cavendish St, London W1W 6YW

Thomas Bang: States of discontinuity: New and recent work

Thomas Bang, Sign (Flying Yellow Flags for Elena and Nicholae) 2018, Plywood, textiles, leather, gesso, acrylic paint, 165 x 204 x 94 cm

Dominant in Thomas Bang’s exhibition of recent work at FOLD, where eight sculptures as upright as paintings are pinned to the walls, is a concern with how sculpture relates to its supports. In fixing all the works to the gallery walls he questions the distinction between those two most traditional of media: painting and sculpture. Review by Samuel Glanville

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kurimanzutto, Gobernador Rafael Rebollar 94, San Miguel Chapultepec I Secc, 11850 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Sarah Lucas: DAME ZERO

Sarah Lucas, installation view of DAME ZERO, kurimanzutto, Mexico City, 2018. Images courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City.

Whilst firmly rooted in the irreverent humour of Britain, Sarah Lucas: DAME ZERO, currently on view at kurimanzutto, Mexico City, is able to securely locate itself within (as if emerging from) the context of Mexico. Review by Elliott Burns

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Modern Art, 50-58 Vyner Street, London E2 9DQ

Eva Rothschild: Iceberg Hits

Eva Rothschild, Iceberg Hits, exhibition view, Modern Art, Vyner Street, London, 22 March - 5 May 2018

Rothschild's sculptures tantalise us with scripted hints while continually resisting meaning. Clues across titles make it tempting to consider the passion, rejection and sensuality of human relationships as much as how sculptures might relate to one another and to us. Review by Jillian Knipe

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Kader Attia: The Field of Emotion

Kader Attia: The Field of Emotion. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2018

Amid the celebrations of Canada’s 150th birthday last year, there prevailed an anxiety surrounding its colonial origins, and the efforts to reconcile past and continuing mistreatment of its indigenous groups with its modern national identity. It’s within this context that French artist Kader Attia stages his first major exhibition in the country, Fields of Emotion at the Power Plant, Toronto. Presenting a series of works dealing with political and individual traumas, Attia traces a thread of genealogies and histories which offset sanitized narratives and explores the lingering impact of atrocities left unaddressed or disavowed. Review by Alec Kerr

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Langlands & Bell: Internet Giants: Masters of the Universe

Icon (Mark Zuckerberg)

Internet Giants: Masters of the Universe at Birmingham's Ikon Gallery is a timely mediation on how dominant technology behemoths, like Facebook, have completely reshaped our cultural and social landscape. Teasing out these complexities through new sculptural and digital works, artists Langlands & Bell question if the opulent mega campuses of Apple and Google will define our age. Review by Jack Welsh

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Cubitt, 8 Angel Mews, London N1 9HH

Hardeep Pandhal: Liar Hydrant

Hardeep Pandhal, Liar Hydrant Mood Board detail, Cubitt Gallery, 2018.

The video works layer lurid cartoons, psychedelic narratives and deadpan rap music; they are accompanied by production drawings and a sculpture. Edmée Lepercq reviews Hardeep Pandhal's solo exhibition at Cubitt.

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Lilah Fowler: nth nature

Lilah Fowler: nth nature, 2018

The city is striated into manifold ordered grids that similarly control our movements. The Nevada desert on the other hand, one of the locations Lilah Fowler explored for her show at Assembly Point, has no such boundaries and borders – it has an order more in common with a modulating weather system than any Cartesian geometry. Review by Matthew Turner

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Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke St, Oxford OX1 1BP

Cinthia Marcelle: The Family in Disorder: Truth or Dare

Cinthia Marcelle, The Family in Disorder: Truth or Dare installation view, 2018.

Upon entering the upper gallery of Modern Art Oxford, there is something slightly reminiscent of an art foundation course exhibition in 'The Family in Disorder: Truth or Dare' (2018), an installation of 'exploded' materials, as if students had been asked to explore those materials, languages, and meanings, resulting in a rather haphazard assemblage. Review by Paul Black

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Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 140 George St, The Rocks NSW 2000, Australia

21st Biennale of Sydney: SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

21st Biennale of Sydney, SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement installation view

Artistic Director Mami Kataoka utilizes the concept of Superposition as a metaphor for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Superposition is a theory borrowed from quantum mechanics, it posits that different, even seemingly conflicting, components are held in suspension - equal in their difference and vital to the whole. This metaphor seeks to bring the different threads, directions, contradictions and loose-ends that exist in our contemporary world into a (utopian) balance. Review by Kathleen Linn

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KARST Gallery, 22 George Pl, Plymouth PL1 3NY

Assembled Spaces

Assembled Spaces at KARST Gallery, 2018 installation view

Assembled Spaces brings together the work of Tine Bay Lührssen, Nina Brauhauser and Ilka Helmig in their UK debut. The artist trio combine photography, sculpture and traditional and digital drawing with a considered harmony in the arrangement of the works. They zigzag between each other, creating a visual conversation which dictates no linear instructions, nor a start or end point, to the viewer’s navigation. Review by Eva Szwarc

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Cordova, Carrer de Portugalete, 15, 08014 Barcelona, Spain

Siera Hyte: Honey Week

Installation view, Siera Hyte: Honey Week, Cordova Gallery

Inspired by ‘The Butterfly’s Evil Spell’ (1920), Federico Garcia Lorca’s first ever play, Sierra Hyte’s ‘Honey Week’ is an invitation to participate in an almost theatrical setting in which humans, animals and creatures alike are welcome to partake of the space. Review by Marta Faria

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Actions. The image of the world can be different

Installation view, Rana Begum

Kettle's Yard in Cambridge re-opens following a multi-million pound redevelopment of its galleries and public spaces and takes this question, and its possible answers, as a starting point. It features the work of 38 practitioners whose works fill the galleries, the on-site historic house and a nearby church, as well as occupying space online and being emblazoned on the uniform of the front of house staff. This exhibition is expansive. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Museum Voorlinden, Buurtweg 90, 2244 AG Wassenaar, The Netherlands

Martin Puryear

Martin Puryear 2018 Voorlinden Museum installation view

The arrangement of the Voorlinden Museum’s current exhibition, Martin Puryear, surprises and makes it a delight to behold. Whereas the first half of the presentation is dominated by polychromed sculptures, natural wood surfaces predominate in the second half. A key feature of the layout is that it eschews a chronological ordering which urges viewers to seek out aspects that highlight alternate paths of development. Review by John Gayer

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Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W 17th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

A Lost Future

A Lost Future, 2018 installation view

Currently at the Rubin Museum, New York, is A Lost Future, a yearlong exhibition on view through January 28th, 2019, showcasing explorations of the future, a theme that in this context is applied specifically to Bengal and South Asia by Shezad Dawood, Matti Braun, and the Otolith. Review by Louis Soulard

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