Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, 521 W 21st St #1, New York, NY 10011, USA

Laura Lima : I hope this finds you well.

Nomad

Brazilian artist Laura Lima’s work has infamously flouted even the most provisional classifications art discourses run on today, let alone the traditional ones. Based in Rio de Janeiro, and initially spurred on by interests in law and philosophy, Lima continues to cultivate a body of work that builds on post-relational art concerns and the aesthetic, if not political, principles espoused by the fallout of the Brazilian Neo-Concrete Movement, in both theory and practice. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 118 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen

Cecilia Vicuna: About to Happen, February 1 – March 31, 2019, installation view, Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. Photos: Constance Mensh

Cecilia Vicuña’s first major solo exhibition presents a delicate balancing act between the large- and small-scale, and between works that are explicitly political and those that are more personal. Combining textiles, video, found objects, wood, paper, poetry, and more, ‘About to Happen’ is grounded in the artist’s dedication to her craft and to her advocacy, often making the most impact with the most intimate, fragile works. Review by Deborah Krieger

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Kohta, Teurastamo inner yard, Työpajankatu 2B, building 7, 3rd floor, 00580 Helsinki, Finland

Britta Marakatt-Labba: History in Stitches

Britta Marakatt-Labba:Untitled (2018-19), textile, embroidery

How strange to step from snow-filled streets and the twilight of a late winter afternoon in Helsinki into Kohta’s radiant space and find oneself confronted by scenes executed in similarly atmospheric and subdued tones. Looking reveals an unfamiliar world, fashioned by Britta Marakatt-Labba’s unique cultural background and artistic approach. Review by John Gayer

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

Mariana Castillo Deball: Finding Oneself Outside

Mariana Castillo Deball, Nuremberg Map of Tenochtitlan, 2013. Installation view: Preis der Nationalgalerie fur Junge Kunst, Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum fur Gegenwart, Berlin, 2013.

Mexican-born, Berlin-based multimedia artist Mariana Castillo Deball’s practice interrogates the junctures between fields of knowledge as disparate as archaeology, anthropology, material culture, art and history. More specifically, Castillo Deball’s works probe into the hows and whys of objects transformed – (re-)activated, granted agency, even fetishized – into art objects, with all due implications. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NJ

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83 installation view

The sun-soaked palette of Rauschenberg’s home on Captiva Island in Florida, where he settled in 1970, is injected into works like Lipstick (Spread) (1981), with its crimson umbrella and smear of bubble-gum pink. Umbrellas find their way back into another highlight of the show, Untitled (Spread) (1982), where two open parasols like blooming sunflowers bring harmony to a reel of collaged pictures of the American flag, shipping containers and lithe athletes. Review by Claire Phillips

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M100, Søndergade 26, Kld. 5000 Odense C. Denmark

Louise Sparre: Vibrant

Louise Sparre, view of the front room

Louise Sparre’s solo exhibition ‘Vibrant’ is like a journey into the body. It begins with works that refer to the body’s surface, such as ‘Adaption’ and ’Fabric Object’, which respectively relate to the skin and the vagina as border areas between outer world and inner body. Text by Mette Kjærgaard Præst

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Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2PH

Jeff Koons

Gazing Ball (Rubens Tiger Hunt)

There’s a frustrating quote from Jeff Koons in the catalogue accompaniment to a new exhibition of his artwork at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. “I’ve tried to make work,” it says, “that any viewer, no matter where they came from […] would have to say that on some level “Yes, I like it.” If they couldn’t do that, it would only be because they had been told they were not supposed to.” Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Emmie McLuskey: these were the things that made the step familiar

these were the things that made the step familiar, Collective, 2019

The eight large scale screen print collages, audio works, printed matter and gymnastic ‘furniture' that make up Glasgow-based artist Emmie McLuskey's installation at Collective look at the shared poetics of the filmmaker and choreographer by analysing, describing and recording the body, through its interactions and its gestures, between rest and motion. Review by Alex Hetherington

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Koenig Gallery, 121, Alexandrinenstraße 118, 10969 Berlin

Helen Marten: Fixed Sky Situation

People, terms in barking (us)

For her most recent exhibition titled ‘Fixed Sky Situation’ at Koenig Galerie, Turner and Hepworth Prize winner Helen Marten presents eight new works, including three complex installations and five large paintings that circle the space like secular polyptychs. Review by Anais Castro

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MO Museum, Pylimo g. 17, Vilnius 01141, Lithuania

All Art Is About Us

Installation view, All Art is About Us exhibition, MO Museum, Vilnius.

The inaugural exhibition, ‘All Art is About Us’, is made up predominantly of painting, video installation and photography from the museum’s collection of Lithuanian art. Review by Gulnaz Can

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The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

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John Hansard Gallery, 142-144 Above Bar Street, Southampton, SO14 7DU

Siobhán Hapaska: Snake and Apple

Siobhan Hapaska, installation view, John Hansard Gallery, 2019

The ground level of John Hansard Gallery plays host to the recent productions of Irish artist Siobhán Hapaska. Four large sculptures zigzag the length of the room, while the world outside becomes part of the exhibition, like a film projected through the gallery’s giant windows. The artist’s work prompts a wake-up slap as it translates Greek tragedy-scale despair into our current day goings on. Review by Jillian Knipe

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