Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Parasol unit, 14 Wharf Rd, Hoxton, London N1 7RW

Heidi Bucher

Heidi Bucher, installation view at Parasol unit, London, 2018.

Wood panelled rooms with French windows, parquet flooring, linen duvets and night gowns embroidered with edelweiss. What is on display at Parasol unit are not the surfaces themselves but their skins, cast in latex by the Swiss artist Heidi Bucher whose importance has been increasingly recognised since a posthumous retrospective at the Migros Museum in Zurich (2004). Review by Samuel Glanville

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Survey

Installation View of Survey at Jerwood Space, London, 3 October - 16 December 2018.

An assembly of work from fifteen early career artists who have been nominated from across the UK, ‘Survey’ is an exhibition comprising a wide range of disciplines. From film, performance and drawing, to painting, ceramics and installation, it gives rising voices within the sector the opportunity to stand out and stand up. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

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Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

fig-futures, WEEK 1 / EVA ROTHSCHILD + JOE MORAN

Eva Rothschild & Joe Moran, A Setup, 2018. fig-futures at Kettle's Yard, University of Cambridge.

In tight financial times, it is good to see this kind of generous programming, and the more concentrated format’s strength lies most especially in its potential for more intense, focused conversations between artists, artworks and disciplines as well as the opportunities for experimentation that such a short run provides. Review by Clare Robson

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Amos Rex, Mannerheimintie 22–24, 00100 Helsinki, Finland

teamLab: Massless

Black Waves

Massless, teamLab’s first exhibition in the Nordic countries of Europe, celebrates the transformation of Helsinki’s Amos Anderson Art Museum into Amos Rex by filling the majority of the institution’s newly minted subterranean home with a series of immersive, multimedia installations. Review by John Gayer

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Lily Brooke Gallery, 3 Ada Rd, Camberwell, London SE5 7RW

Charlie Godet Thomas: WHAT IS IT, THIS TIME?

Song of Experience

In his current show WHAT IS IT, THIS TIME? at Lily Brooke gallery, Charlie Godet Thomas transforms the immateriality of flat text into three-dimensional sculptural objects, capturing the moment words carve an emotional space in the mind of a reader and the outside world. Review by Matthew Turner

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Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont St, Oxford OX1 2PH

Spellbound

Concealed Shield

Spellbound is an exploration of meaning; instead of being disturbing for the reasons one might expect - it is in fact rather sad - it conjures a world where individuals struggle to guard against misfortune - to use the only defence they have against loss - that of magical thinking; and it becomes evident that we still possess that thought process today: in the form of the lovers’ padlocks cut from Leeds Centenary Bridge - a contemporary act of ritualistic magic, still existing in a western secular society. Review by Paul Black

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Michael Jackson: On the Wall

Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II (Michael Jackson)

The religious aspects of the exhibition are divided. Some works stand as testament to Jackson’s enigmatic international appeal. One room contains footage from the 1992 Dangerous world tour, revealing delirious crowds, a mass euphoria even outstripping Beatlemania: while the Fab Four played to 55,000 people at Shea Stadium in 1965, Jackson’s concert in Bucharest is estimated to have been attended by nearly 100,000. And the numbers don’t stop there: more than 1,000,000 fans are said to have congregated outside Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, while the televised spectacle itself is said to have been watched by more than 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. “We’re more popular than Jesus,” said Lennon of the Beatles in 1966. One wonders where this places Jackson. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court, Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

Hazel Brill: Shonisaurus Popularis

Hazel Brill: SHONISAURUS POPULARIS installation view

For an artist whose work often deals with fantasy and simulation, Las Vegas is an ideal subject for Brill, its evolution as a setting for desire, is a perfect mirror for her distinctive, cinematic and kaleidoscopic installations. Review by Piers Masterson

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CGP London, The Gallery by the Pool, 1 Park Approach, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA

The Everyday Political

The Everyday Political installation view 2018

As the exhibition attempts to showcase an emerging contemporary art scene in the North East, Lenihan and Meikle while critiquing the banal geographical rubric used by the current Great North Exhibition – this exhibition is not part of the official programme – the pair insightfully identify ‘restorative nostalgia’ and the appeal of the ‘off-modern’ as two subjects that fixate the cultural landscape of the region. Review by Piers Masterson

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

LOW BATT.

LOW BATT. installation view

The exhibition’s text opens with a quote from the film Dawn of the Dead, where a group of survivors find refuge from the zombie apocalypse in a shopping mall. The exhibition seeks to problematize our reliance on technology and looks for alternative forms of survival, asking ‘What tools might expedite shopping mall survivalism?’ For Turf projects, who are being evicted from this space at the Whitgift at the end of the year to make way for a shiny new Westfield, the question of survival has never been more urgent. Review by Amy Jones

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Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art, Witte de Withstraat 50, 3012 BR Rotterdam, Netherlands

Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition

Irene Kopelman, 77 Colors of a Volcanic Landscape A, B, C (2016) and Puzzle Piece (2012) part of Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art 2018

Stepping into Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, lands one in an ambiguously sparse installation filled with plenty of air and light. Here it takes time to adjust to the presentation’s scope, as some of the works offer bare whispers of visual information that are delicately precise representations that cannot be grasped in a few milliseconds. Review by John Gayer

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The Tetley, Hunslet Rd, Leeds LS10 1JQ

Material Environments

Material Environments installation view

Inspired by Yorkshire’s cult status as a UFO hotspot, Serena Korda has created a new immersive and raw sound work, ‘Clairaudience’ (2018). Korda’s research process is mapped across three galleries. Review by Jack Welsh

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