Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

Hauser & Wirth Somerset, Durslade Farm, Dropping Lane, Bruton, Somerset BA10 0NL

Djordje Ozbolt: Brave New World

Djordje Ozbolt: Brave New World, installlation view at Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 2017

Visitors to 'Brave New World,' the culmination of Djordje Ozbolt's residency at Hauser & Wirth Somerset, are greeted by a procession of garden gnomes traipsing through the courtyard and into the Threshing Barn. These brightly-coloured statues, which Ozbolt rescued from his home country of Serbia and re-cast in resin, are described by the artist as ‘unwelcome guests, cultural refugees’. Review by Bob Gelsthorpe.

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The Edge, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY

James Capper: Sculpture & Hydraulics

James Capper: Sculpture & Hydraulics, installation view at The Edge, 2017.

At the far end of the gallery, a long articulated steel arm, wound round with thick coils of hydraulic hose, perches vulture-like upon two tonnes of concrete. Though it rests dormant now, its plinth wears the scars of previous savagery. Earlier, the artist James Capper had taken to the controls of ‘Atlas Prototype’ and directed the arm, equipped with a menacing mace-like mill, against the base on which it stands. Review by Kit Webb.

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Breese Little, Unit 1, 249 - 253 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 6JY

Parallax scrolling

Parallax scrolling, Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague, Installation View

‘Parallax scrolling’ is an exhibition that proposes a series of visual tactics by artists Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague. These invite viewers to engage with perception and perspective by utilising simple optical devices, drawing our attention to the process of representation. Review by Cristina Ramos González

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

Tropical Hangover

Tropical Hangover, installation view.

In the hot, damp climate of the rainforest, no sooner than an animal or plant dies, it begins to decay, feeding the maggots and soil from which new life grows. The tropics are an uncompromisingly ugly environment. The notion of nature’s immutable beauty is a human construction; one, as Tenderpixel’s group show ‘Tropical Hangover’ reveals, perpetuated by art. Henry Broome reviews

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Bodega, 167 Rivington Street, Lower Level East, New York

Hannah Black: Soc or Barb

Hannah Black: Soc or Barb, installation view at Bodega, 2017

Today there are many critical voices calling for America to look carefully at the political landscape of Europe in the interwar years. Hannah Black’s second solo exhibition in America, ‘Soc or Barb,’ uses an abridged citation of the communist philosopher and activist Rosa Luxemburg to remind her audience of a previous political precipice, the failed 1918 German Revolution. Review by Alexandra Symons Sutcliffe.

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IMT Gallery, 2, 210 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9NQ

you were high when I was doomed

Installation view, you were high when I was doomed, IMT Gallery

The walls of the gallery have been spray painted to resemble some kind of toxic sky, with poisonous greens and billowing hues of black and purple. It creates a trail of changing colours like some kind of Romantic painter’s nightmare, through to its charred end. Review by Theo Turpin

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Tensta Konsthall, Taxingegränd 10, Box 4001, 163 04 SPÅNGA, Sweden

Trevor Paglen: Autonomy Cube

Trevor Paglen, ‘Autonomy Cube’ 2014. Installation view,Tentsa Konsthall, 2017.

Trevor Paglen's 'Autonomy Cube' is made in collaboration with digital civil liberties activist, computer security researcher, and artist Jacob Appelbaum, and provides a secure Wi-Fi network to gallery visitors. Creating a network through "onion routing" the work makes users’ precise information virtually untraceable.

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Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, Stadhouderslaan 41, 2517 HV Den Haag, Netherlands

Rinus Van de Velde

Rinus Van de Velde, installation view at  Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, 2016

Stepping into Rinus Van de Velde’s installation situates one in an outsized and totally absorbing graphic novel. His large and powerful charcoal on paper drawings tell of life at an artists’ colony led by the idiosyncratic, manipulative and fictional sculptor Isaac Weiss, just the latest in a string of stand-ins Van de Velde employs in his work. Review by John Gayer.

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Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke Street, Oxford, OX1 1BP

Lubaina Himid: Invisible Strategies

Lubaina Himid: Invisible Strategies, installation view at Modern Art Oxford, 2017

Opening the day following the inauguration of President Trump, Lubaina Himid’s exhibition at Modern Art Oxford comes at a significant moment. Yet it must be remembered that as an artist, curator and self-described ‘political strategist,’ Himid has worked tirelessly throughout her practice over the last 30 years to highlight the implicit and systemic racial exclusion within British art institutions and society.

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Emalin, Unit 4 Huntingdon Estate, Bethnal Green Rd, Shoreditch E1 6JU

Condo: Emalin hosting Galerie Gregor Staiger

Installation View, Condo: Emalin hosting Galerie Gregor Staiger

Carolina Mostert responds to a group exhibition at Emalin, as part of the multi-sited project 'Condo'. She finds a series of curious forms layered with myth, history and a variety of technologies.

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Pilar Corrias Gallery, 54 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EF

Charles Avery: The People and Things of Onomatopoeia: Part 2

Installation view gallery 2

Recent political developments in the UK have naturally left the issue of an island mentality very present in people’s minds. Avery has described his protagonists as philosophically engaged rationalists but with such clear contrast between the Island’s urban and rural life, you wonder how long before the Islanders might have a revolution. Review by Tessa Norton

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Passen-gers, Brunswick Centre, London

Evy Jokhova: Towering in the condition of fragments

Installation view, l-r: Totem VIII, 2017, plaster, steel, cement, polystyrene, stone effect; Slabs on Stone II, 2016, carved stone, linoleum, oil paint, stone effect, timber; Slabs on Stone I, 2016; Totem I, 2016

Evy Jokhova’s exhibition consists of a mix of sculptures and installations that generate questions about nature and artifice, crafted and found objects, and subjective and objective states. Stacked in formations that resemble cairns, the works explore the social and historical dimensions of stone, linoleum, paint and fur. Review by Anya Smirnova

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