Viewing articles tagged with 'Sculpture'

CHEWDAY’S Ltd, 139 Lambeth Walk, London, SE11 6EE

Gabriele Beveridge: Eternity Anyways

Eternity Anyways, Installation View

Less interested in a prescriptive rhetoric on consumer culture than exploring how the poetic and the personal can be addressed under contemporary conditions, Beveridge sits on the line between ambivalence and celebration – investigating a fascination between the lure of consumer images and objects and the values that they preserve and perpetuate.

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Stuart Shave/Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

Nicolas Deshayes: Thames Water

Nicolas Deshayes, Thames Water, Modern Art, 1-24 September, exhibition view

'Thames Water' continues Deshayes' idiosyncratic use of industrial materials and processes by positioning cast iron sculptures that function as radiators around the perimeter of the gallery. Review by William Rees

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Petzel Gallery, 456 W 18th Street, New York 10011

Simon Denny: Blockchain Future States

Simon Denny, Blockchain Future States, Installation view, Petzel Gallery, 2016

Regularly describing his own work as a form of fan art, Simon Denny’s practice revolves around new technology narratives: from Kim Dotcom to the NSA. In ‘Blockchain Future States’, he takes on the enigmatic Satoshi Nakamoto as his subject. Review by William Rees

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Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Mike Kelley: Framed and Frame

Installation view, Mike Kelley. Framed and Frame, Hauser & Wirth London, 2016

Piers Masterson reviews Mike Kelley's large-scale installation at Hauser & Wirth, exploring issues surrounding the reproduction and dissemination of cultural heritage.

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BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA

BALTIC Artists’ Award

Eric N. Mack, A Lesson in Perspective 2017, activated by participant, BALTIC Artists' Award 2017, installation view, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art Gateshead.

The BALTIC Artists’ Award is a clear attempt to combat some of the issues associated with prize exhibitions through a format that provides an actual and equal opportunity for four artists to develop and showcase significant new bodies of work. The award has no limit on age or nationality, is selected by some of the world’s leading contemporary artists (who also mentor the shortlisted artists) and has no ‘winners’ or ‘losers,’ with prize money (totalling £30,000 per artist) shared equally amongst the four. Review by Amy Jones

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Various, The Azores

Walk&Talk

Walk&Talk 2017, Joao Paulo, Serafim Naturalis Historiae

For the last seven years, the contemporary art festival Walk&Talk, has been bringing international artists to the Azores to make work in the galleries, museums, and streets of Ponta Delgada and further afield across the rest of São Miguel and Terceira. This year’s programme engages with the unique location, natural environment and history of the islands with playful, self-referential and at times antagonistic artworks considering what it means to live and make work at the periphery. Review by Jessie Bond

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Matthew Marks Gallery, 522 West 22nd Street, New York

So I traveled a great deal…

So I traveled a great deal... Installation shot, 2017

Featuring six Northern California artists, So I traveled a great deal... is organized by the artist Vincent Fecteau and the curator Jordan Stein, and reflects their interest in the lesser-known, the ahead-of-its-time, the hard-to-classify, the ecstatic, the hermetic, and the strange.

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

Kaari Upson: Good thing you are not alone

Kaari Upson: Good Thing You Are Not Alone, 2017. New Museum, New York.

‘Good thing you are not alone’, the Los Angeles-based artist Kaari Upson’s first solo museum exhibition in New York City’s New Museum, immediately follows her also having participated and contributed to the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2017 Biennial, which took place not too far uptown in Manhattan. Timing aside, the exhibition is also notable for its size, promising to be of particular interest in providing a glimpse into what Upson’s been up to in the last number of years, especially since having possibly moved on from the monumental ‘Larry Project’, an omnipresence in her practice since the early 2000s. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

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The Power Plant, 231 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8, Canada

Ydessa Hendeles: The Milliner’s Daughter

Ydessa Hendeles, detail from THE BIRD THAT MADE THE BREEZE TO BLOW (Aero-Car No. 500), 2011. Automaton sculpture with key, displayed in mahogany-and-glass vitrine, 511 x 253 x 369 cm.

In her solo show currently on at The Power Plant, Ydessa Hendeles performs the simultaneous roles of collector, curator and artist. ‘The Milliner’s Daughter’ is a complex exhibition showcasing Hendeles’ interest in fables and stories. Her work investigates how narratives, from cultural narratives to fairy tales, inform our individual and collective identities and structure our perceptions of the world. Emma Rae Warburton reviews

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39 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

concrete realities

concrete realities, 2017, installation view, Bortolami, New York

Bortolami’s current exhibition, concrete realities, is a two-person exhibition by Tom Burr and Andrea Zittel. Since the 1990s, Burr and Zittel have trained their attention on the built environment, addressing questions of site-specificity, subjectivity, and the body. This exhibition focuses on their ongoing projects in sites outside of art world centres, which find the artists developing distinct, but congruent methods of tackling their overlapping spatial concerns.

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Helper Projects, 495 Rogers Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11225

Bonded Warehouse

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Alina Tenser and Chris Domenick’s latest sculptural and performance work is currently on view at Helper Projects, New York.

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De La Warr Pavilion, Marina, Bexhill-on-Sea TN40 1DP

Simon Patterson: Safari: an exhibition as expedition

Simon Patterson, rehearsal of Seascape, 2017, with Bexhill Sailing Club

Simon Patterson’s ‘An Exhibition As Expedition’ takes you on a discursive and peripatetic journey, one which is immaterially played out in the mind of the visitor as they traverse the De Le Warr Pavilion. While doing this the artist sets out to undermine traditional bodies of 'stable' knowledge such as maps, museums and archives. Suggesting that meanings, not just in the world of art, are always in a state of shape shifting flux and that truth is just another strange sub-genre of fiction. Review by Matthew Turner

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

CONGLOMERATE: Station ID

CONGLOMERATE, Still from Desde el Jardin, directed by Sol Calero and Dafna Maimon, 2016.

An elaborate installation is the ‘absurdly complicated’ stage-set for the newest piece of ‘Gesamkunstwerk’ by Berlin-based artist collective CONGLOMERATE, presented at Tenderpixel as their first London-based project. The group comprises a core squadron of 5 artists and filmmakers including Sol Calero, Ethan Hayes-Chute, Derek Howard, Christopher Kline and Dafna Maimon, converging and disbanding at will in different cities and contexts in order to produce 30-minute ‘Blocks’ of programming that make a mess of traditional genres. Review by Alice Bucknell

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Estonia Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, San Samuele Square, San Marco 3199, 2nd floor, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2017: Katja Novitskova: If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes

Katja Novitskova, If Only You Could See What I've Seen with Your Eyes, exhibition view at the Estonian Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, 57th Venice Bienniale

Outside the entrance of the Estonian Pavilion in the 57th Venice Biennale, the phrase ‘If only you could see what I’ve seen with your eyes’ is printed on a poster in glowing red type. Katja Novitskova’s exhibition title originates from the 1982 post-apocalyptic film ‘Blade Runner’ and points toward several themes that run throughout the exhibition. Review by Ashley Janke

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