Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Edel Assanti, 74a Newman Street, London W1T 3DB

Marcin Dudek: Steps and Marches

Marcin Dudek: Steps and Marches, Edel Assanti

The personal nature of this work speaks to Dudek’s practice more widely. Over a number of years, he has been exploring group behaviour and crowd control through the context of the stadium, posing questions about responsibility and autonomy while working through his own past. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Kestle Barton, Manaccan, Helston, Cornwall. TR12 6HU

Togetherness: Notes on Outrage curated by South Kiosk

About Togetherness: Notes on Outrage installation view

In a converted Cornish farmstead situated just ten miles from the southernmost point of mainland Britain, a group show, Togetherness: Notes on Outrage, curated by London gallery, South Kiosk, that started out in London in the summer offers a considered response to – and celebration of – architecture critic Ian Nairn’s 1955 edition of Architectural Review, entitled Outrage. Review by Trevor H. Smith

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Bonington Gallery, Nottingham Trent University, Bonington building, Dryden Street, Nottingham, UK, NG1 4GG

It’s Our Playground: Artificial Sensibility

Installation view

A solo exhibition of new work by Paris-based artist duo It’s Our Playground (IOP), comprised of Camille Le Houezec and Jocelyn Villemont. Artificial Sensibility continues the duo’s ongoing reflection on artificial intelligence – when technology mimics human cognitive behaviour. Artificial Sensibility reveals a hybrid learning process of automated principles of recognition and basic human methods of education.

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Project Narrative Informant, Morley House, 26 Holborn Viaduct, The City of London, London EC1A 2AQ

Juliana Huxtable

Installation view, Project Narrative Informant

In her first UK solo show, Huxtable's focus shifts to what covers the bodies of others. The exhibition is centered around ten panels of text displaying fragments from a larger narrative written by Huxtable. Threaded through the story of a young blonde who falls in with a crowd of skinheads in London, is an analysis of struggles over the meaning of the white skinhead aesthetic: bomber jackets, Fred Perry, Ben Sherman. Review by Kevin Brazil

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Faith Ringgold, America People #20 Die

Covering the period 1963 to 1983 the choice of theme for ‘Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power’ is a timely move, bringing together a disparate selection of work around the theme of artistic responses to the American civil rights and Black Power movements, and the specific experiences of artists as activists for or from the African-American community. Review by Piers Masterson

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Thomas Dane Gallery 3 Duke Street St James's London SW1Y 6BN

Naming Rights

Naming Rights at Thomas Dane Gallery 2017, Installation View

‘Naming Rights’ is a unique exhibition that discloses the arcane mechanisms of an artist run project space, converting the gallery into a place for artistic research and experimentation. The result is a distinctive presentation of works by international artists. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Dreamers Awake

Dreamers Awake, Installation view, 27 June - 17 September 2017

The bodies without eyes, without hands, fragmented and uncanny, as portrayed by the multiple generations of female artists presented in ‘Dreamers Awake’ hijack Surrealist tropes and techniques, and both reproduce and resist the voyeuristic gaze. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 24 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Sunset Décor - Curated by Magalí Arriola

Sunset Décor 2017 Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Installation view

At a time when populations, cultures and the environment are fighting to resist conservative thinking and political assault, Sunset Décor puts into perspective the instrumentalization, now as then, of nature, the individual and the land for the production of a symbolic order in the name of freedom, civilization and democracy.

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Lisson Gallery, 27 Bell Street, London NW1 5BU

Cory Arcangel: currentmood

Cory Arcangel, currentmood. Installation view

Clickbait and regurgitated imagery, freely ripped, hacked and manipulated by Cory Arcangel, uniformly fill Lisson Gallery in his latest solo exhibition ‘currentmood’. William Davie reviews

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Various, The Azores

Walk&Talk

Walk&Talk 2017, Joao Paulo, Serafim Naturalis Historiae

For the last seven years, the contemporary art festival Walk&Talk, has been bringing international artists to the Azores to make work in the galleries, museums, and streets of Ponta Delgada and further afield across the rest of São Miguel and Terceira. This year’s programme engages with the unique location, natural environment and history of the islands with playful, self-referential and at times antagonistic artworks considering what it means to live and make work at the periphery. Review by Jessie Bond

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PM/AM, 259-269 Old Marylebone Road, London NW1 5RA

Ivar Wigan: Young Love

Aligator Pond, 2015

PM/AM’s current exhibition, Young Love, showcases a new body of work by Ivar Wigan documenting two years spent living within the dancehall communities of Jamaica.

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De La Warr Pavilion, Marina, Bexhill-on-Sea TN40 1DP

Simon Patterson: Safari: an exhibition as expedition

Simon Patterson, rehearsal of Seascape, 2017, with Bexhill Sailing Club

Simon Patterson’s ‘An Exhibition As Expedition’ takes you on a discursive and peripatetic journey, one which is immaterially played out in the mind of the visitor as they traverse the De Le Warr Pavilion. While doing this the artist sets out to undermine traditional bodies of 'stable' knowledge such as maps, museums and archives. Suggesting that meanings, not just in the world of art, are always in a state of shape shifting flux and that truth is just another strange sub-genre of fiction. Review by Matthew Turner

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