Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Pi Artworks, 55 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EG

Ipek Duben: in via incognita

Installation view: Ipek Duben, in via incognita, 2018.

“We were human beings once”; “Now he could start a new life”. These are two separate sentences from testimonials scrolling down on a large projection in Pi Artworks London’s back wall. The rest of the exhibition ‘in via incognita’ by Ipek Duben consists of what that semicolon represents: the in-between of having been human once and the possibility of starting a new life. Text by Gulnaz Can

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Wysing Arts Centre, Fox Rd, Cambridge CB23 2TX

more of an avalanche

Wysing Arts Centre, more of an avalanche, installation view, 2018

The exhibition takes the most ubiquitously right wing of pejorative terms – “snowflake” – as its conceptual springboard: the works here reclaim this insult from the political right by embracing and unabashedly exploring it. Empathy for your fellow humans and a willingness to speak up against pernicious injustice are embraced as strengths to celebrate, rather than mocked as signs of hypersensitivity and an inability to cope with ‘real life’. Review by Helena Haimes

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Imperial War Museum London, Lambeth Rd, London SE1 6HZ

Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11

Surveillance Camera with Plinth

The compulsion of artists to respond to certain events as they unfold, as exemplified by artists in Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11 at the Imperial War Museum, London, raises unavoidable questions concerning the relationship between aesthetics and morality. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Andreas Gursky

Installation image, Andreas Gursky at Hayward Gallery 25 January - 22 April 2018

Gursky captures the next step in the evolution of our sense of resolution, a way of seeing beyond increasing levels of detail, one which constantly flips back and fourth between the detail and the overview, perhaps imprinted in us as we zoom in and zoom out when using Google maps – in fractions of a second we can travel from our own home to the scale of the whole world and back again. Review by Matthew Turner

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NS

Women Look at Women

Installation view, Women Look At Women, Richard Saltoun Gallery, London 15 February - 31 March 2018

The show opens with Renate Bertlmann’s ‘Transformations’ (1969/2013), a series of 53 black and white photographs which address an analysis of gender-specific social roles through the role-play sequence of staged photography. Indeed, the importance of inventing alter-egos in performance seems significant throughout the exhibition. Review by Matthew Cheale

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

No, No, No, No

No, No, No, No Installation View, 2018

Through the use of verbal and visual puns, the works displayed in ‘No, No, No, No’ convey irony and humour, and challenge the audience by playing with ideas of authorship, making and presenting art, and even appropriating existing artworks. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Public spaces around Europe and Iran – Darbast Platform

Tara Fatehi Irani: Mishandled Archive

Mishandled Archive, Tara Fatehi Irani, Tehran (2018)

What we see and hear in ‘Mishandled Archive’ is not limited to one narrator – several voices are heard. It is as if we are wandering in the aural and visual space of a polyphonic text that relieves the many voices of its characters from a singular dominant authority. Review by Helia Hamedani

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Lydia Ourahmane: The you in us

Lydia Ourahmane, In the Absence of our Mothers (2018). Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

A golden tooth is unassumingly mounted on a pin, sticking out of the wall. A cabinet with documents is standing next to it. In the middle hangs an x-ray. It takes another moment to realise a low humming is coming from the floorboards. It finds resonance with the room, with the bodies in it, and creates a feeling of being ‘within’ something latently present. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Ikon Gallery, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

Thomas Bock and Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate

James and Henry Barnard

The first UK-exhibition dedicated to the work of the Birmingham-born convict artist, Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855), at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, is paired with the concurrent exhibition, Edmund Clark: In Place of Hate. This was the the result of a three-year residency spent by the artist at HMP Grendon – Europe’s only entirely therapeutic prison. Despite widely differing careers they both viscerally remind us of the dangers of denying any person a sense of identity. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Cass Sculpture Foundation, New Barn Hill, Goodwood, West Sussex PO18 0QP

The Sleeping Procession

CASS Projects: The Sleeping Procession exhibition. Curated by Sean Steadman and Gabriel Hartley

‘The Sleeping Procession’, a bright and upbeat group exhibition curated by emerging artists Gabriel Hartley and Sean Steadman occupies the gallery with ease. It is a jovial gathering, inspired by the Foundation’s archive of maquettes which the pair have put in dialogue with works by their peers and a number of artists whose work they have found influential. Review by Rebecca Partridge

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories from Across the Arab World

Joe Namy, Red Filled the Intervals; Between the Musical Notes, 2017/2017. Courtesy of the artist. Installation shot, From Ear to Ear to Eye, Nottingham Contemporary, Dec 2017- Mar 2018. Photo Stuart Whipps.

‘From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories From Across the Arab World’ at Nottingham Contemporary explores sound, music and listening in the Arab world, revealing different layers of meaning, intertwined histories, complicated political situations and complex questions. This expansive exhibition spreads across six rooms and showcases works by almost 20 artists who work with sound, are musicians or explore oral stories. Review by Roma Piotrowska

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Chiba City Museum of Art: 3 Chome-10-8 Chuo, Chiba, Chiba Prefecture 260-0013, Japan

Tsuyoshi Ozawa: Imperfection: Parallel Art History

Imperfection

Tsuyoshi Ozawa not only interrogates modern Japanese art history, illuminating the unique and sometimes odd pathways it has taken, he also questions the acts of looking and showing. He is distinct from Takashi Murakami, who proudly proclaimed the value of forgotten history by pushing anime-like figures to the forefront. Ozawa keeps an unstable and ambiguous position, enjoying the diverse and imaginative visions sustained by his perspicacity and sense of humour. Review by Kodama Kanazawa

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Book, Schilt Publishing

Cig Harvey: You An Orchestra You A Bomb

First Loose Tooth

As in ‘You Look at Me Like an Emergency’ and ‘Gardening at Night’, Cig Harvey's personal life remains a foundation for her practice. What differs about ‘You an Orchestra, You a Bomb’ is its comparison between the interior and exterior worlds, and its heightened awareness of life's fragility. Selina Oakes reviews Harvey's third monograph.

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