Viewing articles tagged with 'Photography'

Marian Goodman Gallery, 24 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Sunset Décor - Curated by Magalí Arriola

Sunset Décor 2017 Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Installation view

At a time when populations, cultures and the environment are fighting to resist conservative thinking and political assault, Sunset Décor puts into perspective the instrumentalization, now as then, of nature, the individual and the land for the production of a symbolic order in the name of freedom, civilization and democracy.

Further reading +

Lisson Gallery, 27 Bell Street, London NW1 5BU

Cory Arcangel: currentmood

Cory Arcangel, currentmood. Installation view

Clickbait and regurgitated imagery, freely ripped, hacked and manipulated by Cory Arcangel, uniformly fill Lisson Gallery in his latest solo exhibition ‘currentmood’. William Davie reviews

Further reading +

Various, The Azores

Walk&Talk

Walk&Talk 2017, Joao Paulo, Serafim Naturalis Historiae

For the last seven years, the contemporary art festival Walk&Talk, has been bringing international artists to the Azores to make work in the galleries, museums, and streets of Ponta Delgada and further afield across the rest of São Miguel and Terceira. This year’s programme engages with the unique location, natural environment and history of the islands with playful, self-referential and at times antagonistic artworks considering what it means to live and make work at the periphery. Review by Jessie Bond

Further reading +

PM/AM, 259-269 Old Marylebone Road, London NW1 5RA

Ivar Wigan: Young Love

Aligator Pond, 2015

PM/AM’s current exhibition, Young Love, showcases a new body of work by Ivar Wigan documenting two years spent living within the dancehall communities of Jamaica.

Further reading +

De La Warr Pavilion, Marina, Bexhill-on-Sea TN40 1DP

Simon Patterson: Safari: an exhibition as expedition

Simon Patterson, rehearsal of Seascape, 2017, with Bexhill Sailing Club

Simon Patterson’s ‘An Exhibition As Expedition’ takes you on a discursive and peripatetic journey, one which is immaterially played out in the mind of the visitor as they traverse the De Le Warr Pavilion. While doing this the artist sets out to undermine traditional bodies of 'stable' knowledge such as maps, museums and archives. Suggesting that meanings, not just in the world of art, are always in a state of shape shifting flux and that truth is just another strange sub-genre of fiction. Review by Matthew Turner

Further reading +

Estonia Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, San Samuele Square, San Marco 3199, 2nd floor, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2017: Katja Novitskova: If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes

Katja Novitskova, If Only You Could See What I've Seen with Your Eyes, exhibition view at the Estonian Pavilion, Palazzo Malipiero, 57th Venice Bienniale

Outside the entrance of the Estonian Pavilion in the 57th Venice Biennale, the phrase ‘If only you could see what I’ve seen with your eyes’ is printed on a poster in glowing red type. Katja Novitskova’s exhibition title originates from the 1982 post-apocalyptic film ‘Blade Runner’ and points toward several themes that run throughout the exhibition. Review by Ashley Janke

Further reading +

Klein Sun Gallery, 525 W 22nd St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Ji Zhou: Real Illusion

Ji Zhou, Greenhouse 2, 2017, archival pigment print, 110 x 250 cm

Moving between imagined and inhabited geographies, the artist suggests that our grasp on the tangible world is a tendentious fiction. Review by Tausif Noor

Further reading +

Victoria Miro Gallery, 16 Wharf Road, London N1 7RW

Isaac Julien: “I dream a world” Looking for Langston

Installation view, Isaac Julien: "I dream a world" Looking for Langston

Julien’s visually arresting installation is luminous and large-scale, a combination of text, documentation and photography. Most notable are the sizeable prints of well-dressed, handsome characters from his film. However, to stop at that would mean to miss the self-determinism of his subject and process. Review by Joan Lee

Further reading +

Copperfield Gallery, 6 Copperfield Street London SE1 0EP

We have the weights, we have the measures

Installation view, We have the weigts, we have the measures at Copperfield, London.

Territories envisioned and established on someone else’s behalf and their symbolic manifestations in the everyday are the driving force behind this show. This draws upon the political manoeuvres performed by any form of power in order to claim geography. Review by Rafael Barber Cortell

Further reading +

Annka Kultys Gallery, 472 Hackney Rd, Unit 3, 1st Floor, London E2 9EQ

Signe Pierce: Faux Realities

Installation view 2017, Signe Pierce, Annka Kultys

“This is where it all started,” Signe Pierce points toward a lone print of a silhouetted palm tree that has somehow managed to wrangle free from the infinite scroll of neon-soaked imagery expanding across the walls of Annka Kultys Gallery for her ‘Faux Realities’ exhibition. Review by Alice Bucknell

Further reading +

ALMA ZEVI, Salizzada San Samuele, 3357, 30124 Venice, Italy

John Smith: Films in Sheep’s Clothing

John Smith, Films in Sheep's Clothing, Om, 1986, ALMA ZEVI, 2017

In an increasingly earnest art world, visitors to Alma Zevi’s gallery off the main sway of the Grand Canal can take relief in the comedic value of mistranslation and mistaken identity. John Smith’s films - showcased for the first time in Italy in Zevi’s solo exhibition – are arranged into an artful, tightly curated presentation, and span Smith’s forty-year involvement at the frontline of British conceptual film-making. Review by Olivia Paterson

Further reading +

Hales Gallery, Tea Building, 7 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA

Carolee Schneemann: More Wrong Things

Carolee Schneemann, More Wrong Things, 2017, Hales London

Recently awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Carolee Schneemann is best known for her innovations in feminist and performance art. Yet Schneemann’s decades-spanning multimedia practice has also consistently questioned the personal and cultural politics of violence and mourning, which the eloquent recent works in the exhibition continue to examine. Review by Carlos Kong

Further reading +