Viewing articles tagged with 'Painting'

Institute for Contemporary Art Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Drive Boston, MA 02210

Dana Schutz

Big Wave

Dana Schutz is among the foremost painters of her generation and is part of a group of artists leading a revival of painting today. Her distinct combination of figuration and abstraction, expressive colour palette, and her use of imagined and hypothetical scenarios are unique among her contemporaries. The artist’s work captures the frenzy, tension, vulnerability, and struggle of life today, as her subjects actively manage, even fight, both the limitations of the canvas and their depicted environments.

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The Midland Hotel, Marine Road West, Morecambe LA4 4BU

Jenny Steele: This Building for Hope

Not so Nautical A Divide, print on vinyl banner, 2017 artwork and beach

It's rare to find an exhibition which leaves viewers feeling uplifted, sentimental and optimistic. More often than not, artists hotfoot it past nostalgia and the seemingly passé. Manchester-based practitioner Jenny Steele reinvigorates our acquaintance with the past: in this case, with the ‘Seaside Moderne’ and its transatlantic journey between Miami and Morecambe. Review by Selina Oakes

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Simon Lee Gallery, 12 Berkeley Street, London, W1J 8DT

Jeff Elrod

Installation view

At a time when the slippages between our own real and virtual, Jeff Elrod exhibits a series of hybrid images that incorporate analogue techniques into experiments in digital and print media, and explore the relationship between hand-painted and digitally created mark-making.

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Faith Ringgold, America People #20 Die

Covering the period 1963 to 1983 the choice of theme for ‘Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power’ is a timely move, bringing together a disparate selection of work around the theme of artistic responses to the American civil rights and Black Power movements, and the specific experiences of artists as activists for or from the African-American community. Review by Piers Masterson

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Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, 6 Heddon Street, London W1B 4BT

Uwe Henneken: The teachings of the Transhistorical Flamingo

Uwe Henneken, The teachings of the Transhistorical Flamingo, solo exhibition, Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London (2017)

At first sight, there is no strict theme linking the series of works by Uwe Henneken exhibited at Pippy Houldsworth Gallery. They do not belong to a single series, the subject matter shifts from bestial creatures to human figures, from magical settings to surreal landscapes. Carolina Mostert responds to the exhibition

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Folkestone Triennial, various locations

Folkestone Triennial

Bob and Roberta Smith, FOLKESTONE IS AN ART SCHOOL.

Folkestone Triennial is a story within a story. It beckons the visitor to open the book of Folkestone with its historical tales of Roman Villas, bustling ports, French connections and abandoned trade routes. Beyond chapters of the past, it's also a place actively grappling with its identity and future. Review by Jillian Knipe

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The Ferens Art Gallery, Queen Victoria Square, Hull, HU1 3RA

Turner Prize Exhibition Opens

A Fashionable Marriage, 1987 Wood cut outs (various types of wood), Acrylic paint, Newspaper, Rubber gloves, Glue, Plastic (dinner plates), Paper, Tissue, Foil, Wicker basket, Selection of books, Cardboard, Canvas, Charcoal Loaned from Hollybush Gard

The Turner Prize will be presented at the Ferens Art Gallery in Hull for the first time, with an exhibition of work by this year's shortlisted artists: Hurvin Anderson, Andrea Büttner, Lubaina Himid and Rosalind Nashashibi.

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Grand Union, 19 Minerva Works, Fazeley Street, Birmingham B5 5RS

Susie Green: Pleasure is a Weapon

Susie Green, Pleasure is a Weapon, 2017

Weaving in and out of sweaty bodies with a collection of singing, dancing, vaping and harp playing are Susie Green and Rory Pilgrim (together The Brilliant State.) The audience track both artists around the space (being careful not to get tangled in the trailing rope of ‘Slow Burn’ as Pilgrim and Green tenderly dress and undress each other to a mixture of choral, dance and pop music. Review by Amy Jones

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The Fruitmarket Gallery, 45 Market St, Edinburgh EH1 1DF

Jac Leirner: Add It Up

Jac Leirner, Add It Up, installation view The Fruitmarket Gallery 2017.

Leirner’s works frequently organise and repurpose slight ephemera into a surprising coalescence. Whilst the career-wide spectrum of activity on display successfully demonstrates the consistent concerns within her oeuvre, the volume of works within this cross-section seems at odds with their essential simplicity, which at times is perhaps diluted in the two satiated galleries. Review by Nathan Anthony

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Thomas Dane Gallery 3 Duke Street St James's London SW1Y 6BN

Naming Rights

Naming Rights at Thomas Dane Gallery 2017, Installation View

‘Naming Rights’ is a unique exhibition that discloses the arcane mechanisms of an artist run project space, converting the gallery into a place for artistic research and experimentation. The result is a distinctive presentation of works by international artists. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Dreamers Awake

Dreamers Awake, Installation view, 27 June - 17 September 2017

The bodies without eyes, without hands, fragmented and uncanny, as portrayed by the multiple generations of female artists presented in ‘Dreamers Awake’ hijack Surrealist tropes and techniques, and both reproduce and resist the voyeuristic gaze. Review by Anya Smirnova

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The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield, West Yorkshire WF1 5AW

Howard Hodgkin: Painting India

Installation image of Howard Hodgkin: Painting India, 1 July - 8 Oct 2017 at The Hepworth Wakefield.

In his paintings of India – great, gestural strokes of colour – Howard Hodgkin sought to show the fleeting moments and conversations that form an impression of a place. Review by Phoebe Cripps

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Victoria Miro Mayfair, 14 St George Street, London W1S 1FE

Kara Walker: Go to Hell or Atlanta, Whichever Comes First

 Go to Hell or Atlanta, Whichever Comes First, Installation view

The facelessness interrupts personal empathy, forcing the viewer to observe from a distance. There is no possibility for intervention, we are powerless and we have failed. Benjamin Murphy responds to Kara Walker's current exhibition at Victoria Miro Mayfair.

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