Viewing articles tagged with 'New York'

New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 10002

A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving

A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving, installation view at New Museum, New York, 2017

'Shabby but Thriving' at the New Museum is an installation, centred on a two-channel video, that extends A.K. Burns’ trans-feminist practice. Review by Rusty Van Riper

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Bodega, 167 Rivington Street, Lower Level East, New York

Hannah Black: Soc or Barb

Hannah Black: Soc or Barb, installation view at Bodega, 2017

Today there are many critical voices calling for America to look carefully at the political landscape of Europe in the interwar years. Hannah Black’s second solo exhibition in America, ‘Soc or Barb,’ uses an abridged citation of the communist philosopher and activist Rosa Luxemburg to remind her audience of a previous political precipice, the failed 1918 German Revolution. Review by Alexandra Symons Sutcliffe.

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The Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St, New York

Take Me (I’m Yours)

Take Me ('m Yours), installation view at the Jewish Museum, 2016.

‘Take Me (I’m Yours),’ the star-studded group show currently on view at The Jewish Museum in New York, is the third iteration of an exhibition held at London’s Serpentine Galleries in 1995. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo.

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New Museum 235 BOWERY NEW YORK NY 10002 US

Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest

Installation view

Over the past thirty years, Rist (b. 1962) has achieved international renown as a pioneer of video art and multimedia installations. Her mesmerizing works envelop viewers in sensual, vibrantly colored kaleidoscopic projections that fuse the natural world with the technological sublime.

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bitforms gallery, 131 Allen Street, New York

R. Luke DuBois: The Choice Is Yours

R. Luke DuBois: The Choice Is Yours, installation view at bitform gallery, 2016

The Choice Is Yours consists of a series of mechanical voting machines from the forties, fifties, and sixties. Repurposing and building upon these machines, R. Luke DuBois questions individual agency, from the choices we make in our daily lives to those that constitute the “world’s greatest democracy.”

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Bortolami, 520 W 20th Street New York, NY 10011

Caitlin Keogh: Loose Ankles

Caitlin Keogh: Loose Ankles, installation view at Bortolami, New York

Caitlin Keogh's first solo exhibition ‘Loose Ankles’ at Bortolami, readily displays the ongoing inspiration she continues to find in the themes of femininity, anxiety, minimalism and juxtaposition, the bodily form as subject, fashion and advertising literature, and the historical juncture between textiles and design. Review by Arthur Bravo

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Hester, New York

Tarantallegra

Installation view of Tarantallegra, 2016, Curated by Nicoletta Lambertucci

Tarantallegra (or The Dancing Feet Spell) is a powerful charm that forces the contender to dance frantically.

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SculptureCenter, 44-19 Purves St, Long Island City, NY 11101

Leslie Hewitt: Collective Stance

Installation view, Leslie Hewitt: Collective Stance, SculptureCenter, 2016. Photo: Kyle Knodell

Leslie Hewitt’s new exhibition at the SculptureCenter in Queens, New York, is surprising for its spartan modesty, a quietude that highlights both the riveting intellect and powerful emotional current of her work. Review by Liam Hess

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247365
, 57 Stanton Street, 
NY, NY, 10002

Jon Pilkington
: Butterfingers

Butterfingers, Installation View

Jon Pilkington employs failure as a strategy for success, routinely revisiting early motifs until any suggestion of clear hierarchy can reasonably be questioned. These repeated moves promise to remain un-finished, following a trajectory that picks up new traditions along the way and adding to an ever growing ancestry of the artist’s vocabulary.

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Johannes Vogt Gallery, 55 Chrystie Street Suite 202, New York, NY 10002

Marc Horowitz: (Complaining): It’s surprisingly beautiful in here

(Complaining): It's surprisingly beautiful in here, Installation View

Mark Horowitz approaches painting from a cinematographic standpoint, similar to the process of video making — from creative writing and mood boards, to casting, location scouting, propping, dialogue adaptation, establishing mise-en-scène, improvisation and editing — he chooses characters and backgrounds of display that fluctuate between landscapes, interiors and still lifes while enacting personas that could range from anywhere between Greek goddesses to the weather man.

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New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch

Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch, 2016

Participants are required to imagine their own reasons for the objects being chosen for the show rather than it being made clear why they were included. 'A Pot for a Latch' is an Internet of 'things' predicated upon community and storytelling instead of explicit information. Review by Dylan Schenker

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The Third Policeman, The Third Policeman, 1535 Decatur Street, New York NY 11385

The Place Where He Is Meant To Be Lost

The Place Where He Is Meant To Be Lost, installation view at The Third Policeman, New York, 2016

The Third Policeman presents its inaugural exhibition: 'The Place Where He Is Meant To Be Lost'. The show takes its title from a quote from 'Town Of Cats', a short story by Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami, using his ideas as a springboard to open up a space for artworks that inhabit a solidly contemporary, Murakami-esque zone between the real and the magical, the prosaic and the dreamlike, the deeply personal and the political.

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