Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Rd, London NW3 6DG

Sadie Benning: Sleep Rock

Hotel Fashion

When I first saw Sadie Benning’s ground-breaking ‘cut and paste’ video work in the early 1990s, with their cool soundtracks and deadpan narrations, it was clear that here was an artist who was ahead of their time and whose influence can be seen in practices from Mark Leckey to Heather Phillipson. For their first solo exhibition in London, Benning presents new work that continues their interest in autobiography and found imagery which now finds form through a filmic sequence of paintings and collages. Review by Piers Masterson

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Stephen Friedman Gallery 25-28 Old Burlington Street London W1S 3AN

Andreas Eriksson: Kria

installation view

Stephen Friedman Gallery is delighted to present Swedish artist Andreas Eriksson's third solo exhibition at the gallery: ‘Kria'. Living and working in Lidköping, Sweden, he is known for the unique way he examines nature and the history of painting to illustrate the quiet beauty that underscores everyday life.

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Yto Barrada: Agadir

Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View with performers Nick Armfield, Rory Francis, Tallulah Bond and Jonny Lavelle, Yto Barrada: Agadir, Installation View, The Curve, Barbican Centre, 7 February - 20 May 2018

Commissioned by the Barbican as part of the ‘Art of Change’ programme, Moroccan-born artist Yto Barrada has taken over the Curve gallery with a display of loss, separation and re-emergence. Referencing the novel ‘Agadir’ by Mohammed Khaïr Eddine, the artist reworks the spinal layout of the gallery as a fragmented timeline. Using photography, film, performance and collage, Barrada guides us through a history of colonialism, political subversion and the failure of a Modernist architectural utopia, all wrapped up in an event – an earthquake – that all but destroyed the city in fifteen seconds in 1960. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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The Koppel Prpject Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

Natur Blick

Installation view, Natur Blick, The Koppel Project

In ‘Natur Blick’, scanning - the instinctive visual movement of the human eye, a gesture co-opted by modern technology - is the subject of the work of ten contemporary artists. Review by Olivia Aherne

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Roman Road, 69 Roman Road, London E2 0QN

Alix Marie: La Femme Fontaine

Alix Marie: La Femme Fontaine, installation view, Roman Road, London, 5 April - 20 May 2018.

Water declares itself the primary medium of Alix Marie’s ‘La Femme Fontaine’ – its presence in the gallery is inescapable. Running through long, clear tubes, it finds its way into every corner of the space. It scales the high walls only to come back to the ground. It trickles audibly into shining silver bowls and the splashing carries and echoes. It spills on to the floor, collecting in shallow puddles. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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The approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Evren Tekinoktay: Serpentine

Evren Tekinoktay,Serpentine, Installation view

The overall aesthetic of the current exhibition, ‘Serpentine’, is remarkably conservative. The collages appear to be simple cut-outs; I stare at them, and they freeze. The lines, corners and edges form sharp patterns through the gallery wall; and they are softened by the pale colours outlining and filling the shapes. Review by Carolina Mostert

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Huxley-Parlour, 3-5 Swallow St, Mayfair, London W1B 4DE

Jocelyn Lee: The Appearance of Things

The Bath

It would be hard for anyone, man or woman, to walk into the Jocelyn Lee’s exhibition at Huxley-Parlour and not feel surrounded by the regenerative power of nature and its symbiotic connection to the female body. Of course, these themes have walked hand-in-hand since the earliest forms of visual art, but Lee manages to shed a new light on this age-old allegory in her photography by capturing the physical world in all its transience and fragility. Review by Kristina Foster

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Large Glass, 392 Caledonian Road, London N1 1DN

Alice Channer: A Coin in Nine Hands - Part 5

Crustacean Satellites, 2018. Vacuum Metallised Spider Crab (Maja Brachydactyla) and Brown Crab (Cancer Pagurus) Shells on Stainless Steel Jigs; PVC Coated Steel Cables; Fixings, 295.5 (h/variable) x 105 (w) x 110 (d) cm

'A Coin in Nine Hands - Part 5: Alice Channer (Carapaces)’ is a fascinating celebration of the elaborate figure of a shell. Inspired by Marguerite Yourcenar’s novel ‘A Coin in Nine Hands’ (1993), which recounts the journey of a ten lira coin through the hands of nine different people – a prostitute, an artist and Mussolini’s assassin – this exhibition is part of the gallery’s ambitious project of displaying the work of nine international artists in nine different solo shows over the coming months. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT

Mario Merz, 2002 by Tacita Dean. 16mm colour film, optical sound, 8 minutes, 30 seconds. Film still.

The glance, with its speed and lack of resolution, is probably the defining characteristic of contemporary vision. We see people with the same lack of depth, quickly skimming across their seemingly shallow surfaces. The experience of viewing Tacita Dean’s ‘PORTRAIT’ at the National Portrait Gallery, on the other hand, is more like the process of reading than the ways in which we usually contemplate visual art; the whole show seems to provide a slow, even still, contemplative corrective to the incessant pace of modern life. Review by Matthew Turner

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Alan Cristea Gallery, 43 Pall Mall, St. James's, London SW1Y 5JG

Christiane Baumgartner: Liquid Light

Christiane baumgartner liquid light installation view

Light, so yielding it lies beyond our sense of touch, leaves its trace by an absence: expanses of white are produced by what has been cut away from the imprinting block. Review by Kevin Brazil

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Jerwood Visual Arts, Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, Bankside, London SE1 0LN

Jerwood/FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences

15 days by Imran Perretta as part of Jerwood / FVU Awards 2018: Unintended Consequences exhibition at Jerwood Space until 3 June

This year’s Jerwood/FVU Awards sees Maeve Brennan and Imran Perretta engage with the theme of ‘Unintended Consequences’ by considering, in very different ways, the complex nexus of vision, knowledge and representation. Review by Anya Smirnova

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FOLD Gallery, 158 New Cavendish St, London W1W 6YW

Thomas Bang: States of discontinuity: New and recent work

Thomas Bang, Sign (Flying Yellow Flags for Elena and Nicholae) 2018, Plywood, textiles, leather, gesso, acrylic paint, 165 x 204 x 94 cm

Dominant in Thomas Bang’s exhibition of recent work at FOLD, where eight sculptures as upright as paintings are pinned to the walls, is a concern with how sculpture relates to its supports. In fixing all the works to the gallery walls he questions the distinction between those two most traditional of media: painting and sculpture. Review by Samuel Glanville

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Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2AR

Sondra Perry: Typhoon coming on

Sondra Perry, Installation view, Typhoon coming on, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London, 6 March - 20 May 2018

‘Typhoon coming on’ is the first solo presentation of Sondra Perry’s work in Europe. For those unfamiliar with the artist, one may find themselves swimming against the purple ocean waves projected across the gallery walls in search of Sondra – in search of healing that feeling of uncertainty in an art gallery, amplified by the disorientating, dizzying, environment we’ve found ourselves trying to navigate. Review by Cairo Clarke

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Modern Art, 50-58 Vyner Street, London E2 9DQ

Eva Rothschild: Iceberg Hits

Eva Rothschild, Iceberg Hits, exhibition view, Modern Art, Vyner Street, London, 22 March - 5 May 2018

Rothschild's sculptures tantalise us with scripted hints while continually resisting meaning. Clues across titles make it tempting to consider the passion, rejection and sensuality of human relationships as much as how sculptures might relate to one another and to us. Review by Jillian Knipe

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