Viewing articles tagged with 'London'

Modern Art, 50-58 Vyner Street, London E2 9DQ

Eva Rothschild: Iceberg Hits

Eva Rothschild, Iceberg Hits, exhibition view, Modern Art, Vyner Street, London, 22 March - 5 May 2018

Rothschild's sculptures tantalise us with scripted hints while continually resisting meaning. Clues across titles make it tempting to consider the passion, rejection and sensuality of human relationships as much as how sculptures might relate to one another and to us. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Assembly Point, 49 Staffordshire Street, London SE15 5TJ

Lilah Fowler: nth nature

Lilah Fowler: nth nature, 2018

The city is striated into manifold ordered grids that similarly control our movements. The Nevada desert on the other hand, one of the locations Lilah Fowler explored for her show at Assembly Point, has no such boundaries and borders – it has an order more in common with a modulating weather system than any Cartesian geometry. Review by Matthew Turner

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Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Rd, Belsize Park, London NW5 3PT

Zabludowicz Collection Invites: Hazel Brill

Hazel Brill, Woke Up in Spring, 2018, Mixed media video installation, 9 mins. Solo Invites exhibition, 1 March - 8 April 2018.

Hazel Brill’s new video installation ‘Woke Up in Spring’ presents a compendium of media and cultural references that build up a layered picaresque of the artist’s exploration of her environment. Review by Piers Masterson

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Maureen Paley, 21 Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Kaye Donachie: Silent As Glass

Kaye Donachie, Silent As Glass, exhibition view, Maureen Paley, London 2018

Over the course of her career, Donachie’s work has developed from group depictions of nymph-like youths in a variety of natural settings, including campfires and caves, and hinting at tribal undertones in warm earthy colours, to the caged, closely framed portraits of women in domestic surroundings, even if these are only suggested, we see today. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Pi Artworks, 55 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EG

Ipek Duben: in via incognita

Installation view: Ipek Duben, in via incognita, 2018.

“We were human beings once”; “Now he could start a new life”. These are two separate sentences from testimonials scrolling down on a large projection in Pi Artworks London’s back wall. The rest of the exhibition ‘in via incognita’ by Ipek Duben consists of what that semicolon represents: the in-between of having been human once and the possibility of starting a new life. Text by Gulnaz Can

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Imperial War Museum London, Lambeth Rd, London SE1 6HZ

Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11

Surveillance Camera with Plinth

The compulsion of artists to respond to certain events as they unfold, as exemplified by artists in Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11 at the Imperial War Museum, London, raises unavoidable questions concerning the relationship between aesthetics and morality. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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SCULPTURE AT/VITRINE Bermondsey Square

Charlie Godet Thomas: Cloud Study

Charlie Godet Thomas, Cloud Study, 2017. Commission for SCULPTURE AT Bermondsey Square, London.

Public sculpture usually dominates its surrounds; they are alien objects that often attempt to improve an area by shifting our focus away from it. Conversely, Charlie Godet Thomas’ ‘Cloud Study’, commissioned by SCULPTURE AT and located in Bermondsey Square, is a different species; it blends into the language of the street and manipulates it like a virus, deforming common visual cues and the messages they usually transmit. A sign, for example, is supposed to be read easily, but Thomas’ is ambiguous, and he tells us about our environment instead of distracting from it. Review by Matthew Turner

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Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, Lambeth, London SE1 8XX

Andreas Gursky

Installation image, Andreas Gursky at Hayward Gallery 25 January - 22 April 2018

Gursky captures the next step in the evolution of our sense of resolution, a way of seeing beyond increasing levels of detail, one which constantly flips back and fourth between the detail and the overview, perhaps imprinted in us as we zoom in and zoom out when using Google maps – in fractions of a second we can travel from our own home to the scale of the whole world and back again. Review by Matthew Turner

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Richard Saltoun Gallery, 41 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NS

Women Look at Women

Installation view, Women Look At Women, Richard Saltoun Gallery, London 15 February - 31 March 2018

The show opens with Renate Bertlmann’s ‘Transformations’ (1969/2013), a series of 53 black and white photographs which address an analysis of gender-specific social roles through the role-play sequence of staged photography. Indeed, the importance of inventing alter-egos in performance seems significant throughout the exhibition. Review by Matthew Cheale

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Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming

Installation view of Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming, Camden Arts Centre, 2018.

Rhythm defines Giorgio Griffa’s work. Throughout the Camden Arts Centre’s gallery spaces, from his earliest, late 1960s work to his more recent output, his bright, repeated gestures mark the raw canvases in sequences and patterns. The rhythmic quality is emphasised by the folds of his unstretched canvases, starkly visible, which segment the surfaces of the paintings into something like a score. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Parafin, 18 Woodstock Street, London W1C 2AL

Hiraki Sawa: Fantasmagoria

Hiraki Sawa, fantasmagoria, installation view, Parafin, London, 2018

Drawing on his background as a sculptor, Sawa's films are a physical presence in the gallery. They are at once strange and familiar, showing us known things that have been rendered mysterious. Review by Kaitlyn Kane

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Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9DA

No, No, No, No

No, No, No, No Installation View, 2018

Through the use of verbal and visual puns, the works displayed in ‘No, No, No, No’ convey irony and humour, and challenge the audience by playing with ideas of authorship, making and presenting art, and even appropriating existing artworks. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Lydia Ourahmane: The you in us

Lydia Ourahmane, In the Absence of our Mothers (2018). Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London.

A golden tooth is unassumingly mounted on a pin, sticking out of the wall. A cabinet with documents is standing next to it. In the middle hangs an x-ray. It takes another moment to realise a low humming is coming from the floorboards. It finds resonance with the room, with the bodies in it, and creates a feeling of being ‘within’ something latently present. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Chelsea Space, 16 John Islip St, London SW1P 4JU

Ian Giles: After BUTT

Installation view, Ian Giles: After BUTT. Image courtesy Ian Giles and Chelsea Space, copyright Rob Harris

When does a cultural artefact – a magazine, a film, an artwork – cease to be considered what we might call ‘contemporary’ and enter the realm of the historical? A minute ago? Yesterday? The turn of the millennium? Once its creator/s have passed away? Not until it starts to have what might be called a legacy? Helena Haimes reviews ‘After BUTT’ by Ian Giles, new film currently showing at London’s Chelsea Space.

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