Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont St, Oxford OX1 2PH

Spellbound

Concealed Shield

Spellbound is an exploration of meaning; instead of being disturbing for the reasons one might expect - it is in fact rather sad - it conjures a world where individuals struggle to guard against misfortune - to use the only defence they have against loss - that of magical thinking; and it becomes evident that we still possess that thought process today: in the form of the lovers’ padlocks cut from Leeds Centenary Bridge - a contemporary act of ritualistic magic, still existing in a western secular society. Review by Paul Black

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National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin's Pl, London WC2H 0HE

Michael Jackson: On the Wall

Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II (Michael Jackson)

The religious aspects of the exhibition are divided. Some works stand as testament to Jackson’s enigmatic international appeal. One room contains footage from the 1992 Dangerous world tour, revealing delirious crowds, a mass euphoria even outstripping Beatlemania: while the Fab Four played to 55,000 people at Shea Stadium in 1965, Jackson’s concert in Bucharest is estimated to have been attended by nearly 100,000. And the numbers don’t stop there: more than 1,000,000 fans are said to have congregated outside Jackson’s memorial service at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, while the televised spectacle itself is said to have been watched by more than 1,000,000,000 people worldwide. “We’re more popular than Jesus,” said Lennon of the Beatles in 1966. One wonders where this places Jackson. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court, Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

Hazel Brill: Shonisaurus Popularis

Hazel Brill: SHONISAURUS POPULARIS installation view

For an artist whose work often deals with fantasy and simulation, Las Vegas is an ideal subject for Brill, its evolution as a setting for desire, is a perfect mirror for her distinctive, cinematic and kaleidoscopic installations. Review by Piers Masterson

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CGP London, The Gallery by the Pool, 1 Park Approach, Southwark Park, London SE16 2UA

The Everyday Political

The Everyday Political installation view 2018

As the exhibition attempts to showcase an emerging contemporary art scene in the North East, Lenihan and Meikle while critiquing the banal geographical rubric used by the current Great North Exhibition – this exhibition is not part of the official programme – the pair insightfully identify ‘restorative nostalgia’ and the appeal of the ‘off-modern’ as two subjects that fixate the cultural landscape of the region. Review by Piers Masterson

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves

Installation Image of Katja Novitskova: Invasion Curves at Whitechapel Gallery

Entering Katja Novitskova’s ‘Invasion Curves’ at Whitechapel Gallery is like stepping into the set of a science fiction film. Metallic wires, flashing lights, giant eggs and a human brain occupy the gallery space. Surrounding this landscape, floating sheets of Perspex and resin hang from the ceiling and display phrases such as ‘the right to harvest resources’, ‘we are at an inflection point’, and the title ‘invasion curves’. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, Norfolk Road, Norwich NR4 7TJ

Brian Clarke: The Art of Light

Brian Clarke: The Art of Light at the Sainsbury Centre, supported and organised in association with HENI

Stained glass artist Brian Clarke can remember when the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts was merely a sketch on the back of a napkin. The napkin belonged to architect Norman Foster, and the sketch utilised a unique approach - integrating building with landscape - using the style of structural expressionism. Considering this integration, it would seem fitting that the ‘finally-celebrated’ artist should take advantage of the centre’s grand windows. Review by Paul Black

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Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Rd, London E3 5QZ

Paul Maheke: A fire circle for a public hearing

Paul Maheke, A place you only go through (2018). Produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery and Vleeshal Center for Contemporary Art, Middelburg

When A Fire Circle For A Public Hearing opened at Chisenhale Gallery last April, it was quite frustrating to learn that Paul Maheke was not going to perform live for the whole duration of the exhibition. Despite being completely absent from the stage, Maheke’s body is still present through a video work that plays on a continuous loop. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Turf Projects, 46-47 Trinity Court Whitgift Centre, Croydon CR0 1UQ

LOW BATT.

LOW BATT. installation view

The exhibition’s text opens with a quote from the film Dawn of the Dead, where a group of survivors find refuge from the zombie apocalypse in a shopping mall. The exhibition seeks to problematize our reliance on technology and looks for alternative forms of survival, asking ‘What tools might expedite shopping mall survivalism?’ For Turf projects, who are being evicted from this space at the Whitgift at the end of the year to make way for a shiny new Westfield, the question of survival has never been more urgent. Review by Amy Jones

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Paradise Works, East Philip Street, Salford, Manchester, M3 7LE

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs

Nick Jordan: Mental State Signs installation view

Alongside his artistic practice, Nick Jordan has spent a number of years filming mental health training videos for the University of Manchester’s hospital teaching unit, encountering many cases of ‘disorder’ as a result. This latest body of work, presented at Paradise Works, on the border between Manchester and Salford, responds to one kind of psychosis in particular: a manifestation of schizophrenia known as ‘thought broadcasting’, whereby patients believe that their thoughts are being transmitted and heard by others. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art, Witte de Withstraat 50, 3012 BR Rotterdam, Netherlands

Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition

Irene Kopelman, 77 Colors of a Volcanic Landscape A, B, C (2016) and Puzzle Piece (2012) part of Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art 2018

Stepping into Irene Kopelman, a solo exhibition, lands one in an ambiguously sparse installation filled with plenty of air and light. Here it takes time to adjust to the presentation’s scope, as some of the works offer bare whispers of visual information that are delicately precise representations that cannot be grasped in a few milliseconds. Review by John Gayer

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The Tetley, Hunslet Rd, Leeds LS10 1JQ

Material Environments

Material Environments installation view

Inspired by Yorkshire’s cult status as a UFO hotspot, Serena Korda has created a new immersive and raw sound work, ‘Clairaudience’ (2018). Korda’s research process is mapped across three galleries. Review by Jack Welsh

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Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Abandoibarra Etorb., 2, 48009 Bilbo, Bizkaia, Spain

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World installation view, 2018

What becomes apparent in the latter stages of the exhibition is a sense that many of the exhibition’s themes collapse into one another. 2008 is painted as a pivotal moment where the Beijing Olympics act as an affirmation of China’s ascent to global power, yet the Sichuan earthquake happened only a month before. Review by Stan Portus

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Yorkshire Sculpture Park, West Bretton, Wakefield WF4 4LG

Giuseppe Penone: A Tree in the Wood

Luce e ombra (detail)

The use of wood, twigs and leaves in his work seems to recall Penone’s artistic output of the 60s and 70s, as part of the Italian art movement ‘Arte Povera’ (Poor Art), which placed an emphasis on the use of throwaway materials. However, today, Penone does not shy away from monumentalizing mediums. Review by Kristina Foster

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New College, Oxford, Holywell St, Oxford OX1 3BN

Emily Young

Midnight Head

Born into a family of writers, artists and politicians, British Sculptor Emily Young found an affinity to sculpting from an early age; influenced by her grandmother, the sculptor Kathleen Scott, a colleague of Auguste Rodin and widow of the explorer Captain Scott of the Antarctic. Review by Paul Black

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