Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Grand Union, Minerva Works, 158 Fazeley St, Birmingham B5 5RS

Seecum Cheung: The Dutch Window

Seecum Cheung, The Dutch Window, 2017.

In a time when saboteurs lurk at home and gossips snipe from afar, some reach for the shutters and draw them fast. Better to be kept in the dark, it’s presumed, than to risk the prying of the ill-intentioned. Britain pulls down the blinds. The Channel has rarely felt wider. Kit Webb reviews Seecum Cheung's 'The Dutch Window'.

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Sprüth Magers, Oranienburger Straße 18, 10178 Berlin

Pamela Rosenkranz: She Has No Mouth

Installation view, Pamela Rosenkranz: She Has No Mouth

The Swiss artist Pamela Rosenkranz is interested in the invisible phenomena that affect the material world. Behind a sensual aesthetic, her work is subtly subversive. Rosenkranz often draws from consumer research, notably the effect of toxoplasmosis, a parasite said to infect 30% of the world population and researched for influencing a series of human behaviours, including fear, spending habits, physical attraction and most relevant to the concept of her inaugural solo exhibition at Sprüth Magers Berlin, human fondness for cats. Review by Anaïs Castro

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Hannah Barry Gallery, 4 Holly Grove, Peckham, London SE15 5DF

Oliver Griffin

H Demonstrations of Patterns in Flow What do you expect from your surfaces. A philosophy of Bicycle MotoCross (BMX) and everything. Installation view.

On the wall, hung off-centre in a 3 x 3 grid that recalls the conventional arrangement of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s water towers and grain elevators, are nine risograph prints. They belong to a series of photographs taken by Griffin at a flatland BMX competition in 2015, not of the riders or their performances, but of the streaks whorled by skidding tyres. Review by Kit Webb

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AirSpace Gallery, 4 Broad Street, City Centre, Stoke-on-Trent ST1 4HL

Victoria Lucas: Lay of the Land (and other such myths)

Victoria Lucas, Lay of the Land (and other such myths), installation view at AirSpace Gallery

The spectral colours of ‘Psychedelic Western #3’ (2015) provide a rich exhibition excerpt – its vibrant and effervescent depictions of the Alabama hills are repeated in the show's wall-sized prints and theatrical screens. A feminine sigh welcomes you into the space, while deceptively light boulders – made from layers of polystyrene, fibreglass and jesmonite – catch your eye as they glisten under the gallery's spotlights. Selina Oakes reviews

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Turf Projects, Keeley Rd, Croydon CR0 1TF

Paul Schneider: Ways of Seeing

Installation view, Ways of Seeing at Turf Projects

A simplicity of form is the essence of ‘Ways of Seeing’, Paul Schneider’s solo show at Turf Projects in East Croydon. Screen Beans, the now extinct graphics of the 90s Microsoft Office populate the gallery space of Turf Projects over and over again creating an immersive virtual experience. Review by Zoe Marden

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Athens, Greece

Documenta 14: Athens

Rebecca Belmore, Biinjiya'iing Onji (From inside), 2017, marble, Filopappou Hill, Athens, documenta 14

Documenta 14: 'Learning from Athens' promised to address some of the current social and political issues facing Europe today by questioning its foundations: colonialism, patriarchy, gender-normativity and capitalism. Yet many feared that the exhibition tried to glamorise the ‘Greek crisis’ and capitalise on what is a very complex and difficult social and economic situation. What’s in it for Athens? Review by Anaïs Castro

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Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, Treitlstraße 2, 1040 Vienna, Austria

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses

Camille Henrot: If Wishes Were Horses, installation view at Kunsthalle Wien, 2017.

Before entering Camille Henrot’s solo exhibition ‘If Wishes Were Horses,’ the viewer is required to remove their shoes. While this serves the practical function of not damaging the floor, it is also an intimate gesture with associations of religious worship, the comfort of being at home, privacy, or even sensuality. Review by Deborah Krieger

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Kunstraum, 21 Roscoe Street, London EC1Y 8PT

Sophie Jung: Producing My Credentials

Sophie Jung, Producing My Credentials, Kunstraum, London, 2017.

‘Producing My Credentials’ is a series of performances and an exhibition that invites the audience to enter an audacious and curious version of Sophie Jung’s memory theatre. Review by Christian Lübbert

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Marian Goodman Gallery, 5-8 Lower John Street, London W1F 9DY

Annette Messager: avec et sans raisons

Installation view of Annette Messager, avec et sans raisons, Marian Goodman Gallery London 19 April - 27 May 2017

‘Daily’ (2016) features ropes of black thread akin to dusted cobwebs, a recurring thematic throughout the show used to strangle and surrender items of gigantic proportions; scissors, combs, keys and locks. Items charged with domestic associations lie surrendered in mid-air, transfixed and immobile, a metaphor for frustration which is echoed in the exhibition’s accompanying work. Review by Sophie Risner

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Furtherfield Gallery, The McKenzie Pavilion, Harringay, London N4 2NQ

PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.

Refugee Flag, Installation view at Furtherfield Gallery, 2017

‘PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.’ announces itself with a song and a flag. Yara Said’s ‘Refugee Nation’ flag, designed in lifejacket orange for stateless participants of the 2016 Olympics, floats over the small pavilion in Finsbury Park housing Furtherfield Gallery. Review by David Morris

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945. Installation View, Barbican Art Gallery, London, 23 March - 25 June 2017

This is an exhibition that, alongside showing ground breaking architectural designs and their socio-economical contexts, attempts to dig deeper into the psyche of the Japanese family. Spread across two floors centred around a courtyard with lovingly reconstructed walk-through models of contemporary Japanese rooms, the show allows us to sense what it’s like to live in these finest examples of nanotecture. Review by Dominika Mackiewicz

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Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA

A World View: John Latham

A World View, John Latham, Speak, 1962, Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London, 1 March 2017 - 21 May 2017

Neither chronological nor particularly thematic, the show’s organisation drives home one of the main characteristics of Latham’s work: to a greater or lesser extent all of it reflects his peculiar and esoteric theories of universal time, and his theory of art as event. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Copenhagen Contemporary, Trangravsvej 10–12, 1436 Copenhagen K

Anselm Kiefer: For Louis-Ferdinand Céline: Voyage au bout de la nuit

Anselm Kiefer. For Louis-Ferdinand Céline: Voyage au bout de la nuit. Installation shot, Copenhagen Contemporary 2016.

Four full-size aeroplanes occupy the corners of the vast gallery, each based on a 20th century warplane from Kiefer’s private collection. They are impotent, made from malleable lead and brittle zinc and leaning on rusted props and boulders. Giant poppies burst from a cockpit and ripped-open wings are adorned with sunflowers or weighed down with Kiefer’s signature lead books. Review by Jessie Bond

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