Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

University of Brighton Gallery, 154-155 Edward Street, Brighton BN2 0JG

Natasha Caruana: Timely Tale

Natasha Caruana, from the series, Timely Tale, 2017

Based on the theme of excess, ‘Timely Tale’ invites the audience into the private world of the artist’s mother, Penny. Caruana examines the difficulties of her mother’s life, as she deals with decisions regarding her health, her love of expensive designer clothes and the search for ‘Mr Right’. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Bonington Gallery, Nottingham Trent University, Bonington building, Dryden Street, Nottingham, UK, NG1 4GG

It’s Our Playground: Artificial Sensibility

Installation view

A solo exhibition of new work by Paris-based artist duo It’s Our Playground (IOP), comprised of Camille Le Houezec and Jocelyn Villemont. Artificial Sensibility continues the duo’s ongoing reflection on artificial intelligence – when technology mimics human cognitive behaviour. Artificial Sensibility reveals a hybrid learning process of automated principles of recognition and basic human methods of education.

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The Edge, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY

Parallel (of Life and) Architecture

The edge parallel (of life and architecture) installation view 1

It would be easy to label Parallel (of Life and) Architecture, currently on show at The Edge gallery, Bath, as part of the growing trend for Brutalist revivalism and fanaticism. But far from a familiar fetishisation of the movement, this is exhibition is ambitious, setting out to engage with the ideas of Alison and Peter Smithson, the husband and wife architectural duo who were central to the development of British Brutalism. Review by Stanley Portus

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Alexander Gray Associates, 510 West 26 Street, New York NY 10001

Polly Apfelbaum: The Potential of Women

  Polly Apfelbaum: The Potential of Women, installation view, Alexander Gray Associates (2017)

In Polly Apfelbaum’s first show at Alexander Gray Associates, The Potential of Women, the artist borrows both the title and central design symbiology from the decades-old symposium’s accompanying publication. Her appropriation of this essentialist feminine image, denoted as such by the suggestion of a bob haircut, signals a further call to equity while contemplating the scope of modern identity politics itself. Review by Torey Akers

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Kurimanzutto, San Miguel Chapultepec, 11850 Ciudad de México

Anri Sala: All of a Tremble

Installation view of All of a Tremble

Kurimanzutto's second exhibition of Anri Sala, where the artist explores the relationship between image construction and the physicality of sound. The exhibition illustrates how sound becomes a means to investigate the relationship between form and formation, process and production, being and becoming.

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15th Istanbul Biennial

a good neighbour: 15th Istanbul Biennial

Wonderland

There’s a certain irony to the theme of this year’s Istanbul Biennial. As Donald Trump promises to build a wall between the US and Mexico, Kim Jong-Un fires missiles over Japan, and Teresa May negotiates Brexit, the title, ‘a good neighbour’ seems, well…laughable. Yet, when the curators - Danish artist duo, Elmgreen and Dragset - initially set the subject of the exhibition, how were they to know that this worthy attempt at exploring our universal endeavour to establish a sense of place, would be so timely? Review by Wilhemina Madeley

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David Roberts Art Foundation, Symes Mews, London NW1 7JE

(X) A Fantasy

Installation view of (X) A Fantasy at DRAF, 2017

‘(X) A Fantasy’ is David Roberts Art Foundation’s 10th year anniversary exhibition, its final in the current Camden space. The show brings together twenty-five paintings, photographs, friezes, sculptures, installations and videos by close to twenty artists. Series are rife, their repetitions and alterations mirroring the mechanisms of fantasies. Review by Edmée Lepercq

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Folkestone Triennial, various locations

Folkestone Triennial

Bob and Roberta Smith, FOLKESTONE IS AN ART SCHOOL.

Folkestone Triennial is a story within a story. It beckons the visitor to open the book of Folkestone with its historical tales of Roman Villas, bustling ports, French connections and abandoned trade routes. Beyond chapters of the past, it's also a place actively grappling with its identity and future. Review by Jillian Knipe

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Grand Union, 19 Minerva Works, Fazeley Street, Birmingham B5 5RS

Susie Green: Pleasure is a Weapon

Susie Green, Pleasure is a Weapon, 2017

Weaving in and out of sweaty bodies with a collection of singing, dancing, vaping and harp playing are Susie Green and Rory Pilgrim (together The Brilliant State.) The audience track both artists around the space (being careful not to get tangled in the trailing rope of ‘Slow Burn’ as Pilgrim and Green tenderly dress and undress each other to a mixture of choral, dance and pop music. Review by Amy Jones

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The Fruitmarket Gallery, 45 Market St, Edinburgh EH1 1DF

Jac Leirner: Add It Up

Jac Leirner, Add It Up, installation view The Fruitmarket Gallery 2017.

Leirner’s works frequently organise and repurpose slight ephemera into a surprising coalescence. Whilst the career-wide spectrum of activity on display successfully demonstrates the consistent concerns within her oeuvre, the volume of works within this cross-section seems at odds with their essential simplicity, which at times is perhaps diluted in the two satiated galleries. Review by Nathan Anthony

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The Koppel Project Hive, 26 Holborn Viaduct, London EC1A 2AT

The Hive Mind

The Hive Mind installation downstairs

‘The Hive Mind’ is a group exhibition consisting of sculpture, painting, video and print work by new and established artists, that probes the question of connectivity in an increasingly dysfunctional and meaningless reality. Review by Evie Ward

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Thomas Dane Gallery 3 Duke Street St James's London SW1Y 6BN

Naming Rights

Naming Rights at Thomas Dane Gallery 2017, Installation View

‘Naming Rights’ is a unique exhibition that discloses the arcane mechanisms of an artist run project space, converting the gallery into a place for artistic research and experimentation. The result is a distinctive presentation of works by international artists. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High St, London E1 7QX

Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome

Installation view at the Whitechapel Gallery, Benedict Drew: The Trickle-Down Syndrome (7 June - 10 September 2017)

‘The Trickle-Down Syndrome’ is a large-scale installation, which consists of five interconnected yet individual rooms, inspired both by 1930s backdrops of Hollywood director Busby Berkeley and the Surrealist works of Max Ernst. Review by Fiorella Lanni

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