Viewing articles tagged with 'Installation'

Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 118 S. 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen

Cecilia Vicuna: About to Happen, February 1 – March 31, 2019, installation view, Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. Photos: Constance Mensh

Cecilia Vicuña’s first major solo exhibition presents a delicate balancing act between the large- and small-scale, and between works that are explicitly political and those that are more personal. Combining textiles, video, found objects, wood, paper, poetry, and more, ‘About to Happen’ is grounded in the artist’s dedication to her craft and to her advocacy, often making the most impact with the most intimate, fragile works. Review by Deborah Krieger

Further reading +

Kohta, Teurastamo inner yard, Työpajankatu 2B, building 7, 3rd floor, 00580 Helsinki, Finland

Britta Marakatt-Labba: History in Stitches

Britta Marakatt-Labba:Untitled (2018-19), textile, embroidery

How strange to step from snow-filled streets and the twilight of a late winter afternoon in Helsinki into Kohta’s radiant space and find oneself confronted by scenes executed in similarly atmospheric and subdued tones. Looking reveals an unfamiliar world, fashioned by Britta Marakatt-Labba’s unique cultural background and artistic approach. Review by John Gayer

Further reading +

BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Digital Citizen - The Precarious Subject

Citizen Ex, Part of Digital Citizen, The Precarious Subject, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead

The technological revolution was meant to liberate us, but it has flooded society with endless torrents of information, cataracts of algorithms and a deluge of uncertainty. James Bridle has written fervent polemics warning us of our perilous fate should we not develop a new “systemic literacy” to navigate these unknown waters. Responding to his call, ‘Digital Citizen’ unites the work of ten artists to inspire conversations on citizenship, democracy, identity and reality in a digital world. Review by Christopher Little

Further reading +

Frith Street Gallery, 17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ

Raqs Media Collective: Spinal

Raqs Media Collective, Not Yet At Ease, 2018. Modular padded structure with fabric ceiling, padded stools. Six videos displayed on four monitors and two projections, six channel audio. Dimensions variable.

‘Spinal’, Raqs Media Collective's exhibition at Frith Street Gallery, features the installation ‘Not Yet At Ease’. It reflects on the mental state created by the discomfort and exploitation of First World War soldiers of Asian heritage. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +

New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002, USA

Mariana Castillo Deball: Finding Oneself Outside

Mariana Castillo Deball, Nuremberg Map of Tenochtitlan, 2013. Installation view: Preis der Nationalgalerie fur Junge Kunst, Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum fur Gegenwart, Berlin, 2013.

Mexican-born, Berlin-based multimedia artist Mariana Castillo Deball’s practice interrogates the junctures between fields of knowledge as disparate as archaeology, anthropology, material culture, art and history. More specifically, Castillo Deball’s works probe into the hows and whys of objects transformed – (re-)activated, granted agency, even fetishized – into art objects, with all due implications. Review by Arthur Ivan Bravo

Further reading +

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Ely House, 37 Dover St, Mayfair, London W1S 4NJ

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83

Robert Rauschenberg: Spreads 1975-83 installation view

The sun-soaked palette of Rauschenberg’s home on Captiva Island in Florida, where he settled in 1970, is injected into works like Lipstick (Spread) (1981), with its crimson umbrella and smear of bubble-gum pink. Umbrellas find their way back into another highlight of the show, Untitled (Spread) (1982), where two open parasols like blooming sunflowers bring harmony to a reel of collaged pictures of the American flag, shipping containers and lithe athletes. Review by Claire Phillips

Further reading +

Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2PH

Jeff Koons

Gazing Ball (Rubens Tiger Hunt)

There’s a frustrating quote from Jeff Koons in the catalogue accompaniment to a new exhibition of his artwork at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. “I’ve tried to make work,” it says, “that any viewer, no matter where they came from […] would have to say that on some level “Yes, I like it.” If they couldn’t do that, it would only be because they had been told they were not supposed to.” Review by Rowland Bagnall

Further reading +

Koenig Gallery, 121, Alexandrinenstraße 118, 10969 Berlin

Helen Marten: Fixed Sky Situation

People, terms in barking (us)

For her most recent exhibition titled ‘Fixed Sky Situation’ at Koenig Galerie, Turner and Hepworth Prize winner Helen Marten presents eight new works, including three complex installations and five large paintings that circle the space like secular polyptychs. Review by Anais Castro

Further reading +

The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9LY

Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters, installation view at The Approach, 2019

In the delicate space of The Approach Gallery, group show ‘Shapeshifters’ initially seems a suitably lightweight fit with pastel images and objects tiptoeing across the room. In direct opposition, heaviness slowly wades in through the details, as pinks shift from candy fluorescent to wet plasticky sludge and blood clot red. Review by Jillian Knipe

Further reading +

mother’s tankstation, 41- 43 Watling Street, Usher’s Island, Dublin, D08 NP48, Ireland

Lee Kit: Banal

Blue skied and clear

As you enter Dublin’s mother’s tankstation and Lee Kit’s ‘Banal’ you are greeted by Gnarls Barkley’s 2006 hit song ‘Crazy’. A search for the source of ‘I think you’re crazy’ (2017) reveals a pair of headphones overhead, dangled upside down and tantalisingly out of reach - and out of use. On the wall Kit has, through a plastic storage container, projected a video that has some of the song’s lyrics overlaid, with others missing. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

Secession, Friedrichstraße 12, 1010 Wien, Austria

Philipp Timischl: Artworks for all Age Groups

Philipp Timischl, Artworks For All Age Groups, exhibition view Secession 2018

Endeavouring to create yet another enhancing experience, the Austrian artist Philipp Timischl, in his exhibition ‘Artworks for all Age Groups’ at the Secession Wien, addresses questions of belonging, roots and queerness. Review by Alexandra Gamrot

Further reading +

MCA Denver, 1485 Delgany Street, 80202, USA

Tara Donovan: Fieldwork

Untitled (Mylar), 2011, Mylar and hot glue, Dimensions variable, Site-specific installation

On a physical and material level, but most crucially on a metaphysical and referential plane, Donovan's works multiply, fold and expand beyond the sum of their parts. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

Further reading +

Lily Brooke, 3 Ada Road, London SE5 7RW

Evy Jokhova: Weighed down by stones

Totem XII, 2018, MDF, paint, castor wheels, Perspex, acoustic felt, stone collection, motion sensors, computer, headphones, 60 x 60 x 152 cm (detail)

At Lily Brooke, Evy Jokhova’s latest installation ‘Weighed down by stones’ is archaeological, concerning the weight of the past upon the present and the possibility of returning to it. Review by Jacob Charles Wilson

Further reading +

Rennes

Rennes Biennale 2018: Cries and Echoes

Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, 40m Cube, Les Ateliers de Rennes

Siham and Hafida are two singers of the Aita, a musical genre of the Chikha. Their intergenerational conversations throughout the film give insight to how lived experience is transmitted and challenged by the fact that the younger generations learn the treats of the Aita through clips on youtube. Review by Helena Julian

Further reading +