Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Ikon, 1 Oozells Square, Brindleyplace, Birmingham B1 2HS

ZouZou Group: – door open –

ZouZou Group, St Petersberg Station, still from – door open –, 2019

‘– door open –’ (2014-2019) is a new video artwork of a long standing and ongoing dialogue between two artists, one in Damascus, the other based in England. Toward the end of the twenty-five minute video the English voice-over talks through the technical difficulties the artists encountered over the course of the project. For the safety of the Syrian artist their communications were carried through the ether “by proxy”. Review by Betsy Porritt

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Focal Point Gallery, Elmer Ave, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1NB

David Blandy: The World After

The World After, David Blandy, 2019, installation view.

How many times can the world end? If the current abundance of post-apocalyptic fiction is anything to go by, too many times. Coming out of this crowded field of contemporary art and popular culture is David Blandy’s exhibition ‘The World After’ at Focal Point Gallery, Southend-on-Sea. The show takes as its subject Canvey Wick on Canvey Island, Essex, the site of a partially built oil refinery that was abandoned after the oil crisis in 1973. A case study in regeneration, the Wick is now a 93.2 hectare nature reserve, and one of the most important areas in Britain for endangered invertebrates. For over a year, Blandy has worked with local gaming communities in Southend to write a fictional future for this site, resulting in a film, an installation and a Dungeons and Dragons-esque role-playing game. Review by Kirsty White

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Frans Hals Museum, Groot Heiligland 62; Haarlem, Netherlands

Marianna Simnett: My Broken Animal

The Needle and the Larynx (video still)

I must treat everything as a given. As such, it seems necessary to accept that Marianna Simnett’s exhibition at the Frans Hals Museum feels like two distinct shows packaged into one on purpose. In taking this rupture seriously, the question would then be, why? What does the two-in-one form do here? With the first body comprised of two works from 2016 and the second of four from 2019, a separation along the lines of the chronological is a start. Review by Isabelle Sully

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David Zwirner, 24 Grafton Street, London W1S 4EZ

Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand

Installation views of Jockum Nordström: The Anchor Hits the Sand at David Zwirner London, 22 November 2019 - 19 December 2019.

David Zwirner recently featured ‘The Anchor Hits the Sand’, a solo exhibition by Swedish artist Jockum Nordström. Upon entrance, visitors encounter a collection of Nordström’s watercolour collages. The motifs that comprise the works illustrate Nordström’s imaginative spirit and oeuvre. Each composition is peculiar and ambiguous, characterised by various scenes, with figures who seemingly have no apparent relation to one another. Review by Sheena Carrington

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The Sunday Painter, 117-119 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1XA

Chips and Egg

Milly Thompson, Nor playing the flute, 2015, Oil and acrylic on board, 61 × 51 cm

‘Chips and Egg’ quotes a classic piece of British cinema,’ Shirley Valentine’. The film tells the story of a Liverpool housewife breaking out of her world of domestic cliché to embark on a spontaneous Greek holiday and find love and adventure only to end up in another set of clichés. This is precisely the self-digesting system of cultural production that’s light-heartedly recognised by this exhibition. The success of ‘Chips and Egg’ lies in highlighting the beauty and sincerity in seemingly futile repetition for the sake of care, survival, indulgence and art. Review by Sonja Teszler

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The Mosaic Rooms, Tower House, 226 Cromwell Road, London SW5 0SW

Praneet Soi: Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, Winter in the Kashmir Valley

Praneet Soi: Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, Winter in the Kashmir Valley, The Mosaic Rooms

The exhibition 'Anamorphosis: Notes from Palestine, winter in the Kashmir Valley’ resembles a travelling diary written by a flâneur-cum-researcher, into territories and histories familiar to the artist Praneet Soi. In response to The Mosaic Rooms commission, the artist decided to travel during June 2019 across the Occupied Palestinian Territories including Golan Heights, Jericho and Hebron, and in Israel, in Haifa, Akka and Tel Aviv. Review by Mihaela Varzari

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Touchstones, The Esplanade, Rochdale OL16 1AQ

Jamie Fitzpatrick: He He He He

Jamie Fitzpatrick, He He He He, 2019. Installation view. Contemporary Forward at Touchstones Rochdale.

Split between two rooms, ‘He He He He’ presents 4 male protagonists loosely based on canonical figures such as Elvis Presley, the art-world all-star Henry Moore dressed as a cowboy and an amalgamation of Charles I and Vincent Price as Matthew Hopkins: Witchfinder General. Each character has aptly named one word titles relating to the figures they are based around, highlighting their fairly literal qualities and reason for being selected. Review by William Noel Clarke

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Various locations, Coventry

The Twin: Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art

Installation view at The Herbert Art Gallery & Museum featuring Andrew Jackson (l), Parmar & Piper (c) and Anne Forgan (r)

The figure of the twin is one that resonates with the history of Coventry, one of the first cities to form an international partnership, first twinning with Volgograd 75 years ago. The Biennial draws on this theme, showing work from artists based in several of these twinned cities, alongside recent graduates from the area, and both local and international artists. Besides exploring international relations in the current political moment, themes of the Anthropocene, nature and technology, pairing artistic practice and academic research and acts of repetition emerge throughout the exhibitions. Review by Emily Hale

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham NG7 6BE

John Akomfrah: Mimesis: African Soldier

The Journey, Mimesis: African Soldier

The opening titles to John Akomfrah’s ‘Mimesis: African Soldier’ (2018) state that “six million colonial subjects fought and served in the Great War” and that three-hundred and fifty-thousand died in Europe. Akomfrah’s three-screen installation interweaves archival footage with new material that commemorates those conscripted into the First World War by colonial powers, to fight for a cause not their own. Review by Joshua Lockwood-Moran

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Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Nam June Paik

TV Garden. 1974-1977 (2002) Single-channel video installation with live plants and colour television monitors

Early photographs of Paik at his studio in New York City show him smiling, like a kid in a sweet shop, in a room filled with clutter. The antique technology that blankets the floor arguably appears as rubbish to most. However, to Paik, broken-down technological devices were inspiration. Review by Sheena Carrington

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Spike Island, 133 Cumberland Road Bristol BS1 6UX

Imran Perretta: the destructors

the destructors, production still

In his new film ‘the destructors’, Imran Perretta uses narrative and visual storytelling to articulate his personal experiences with physical and structural violence. The result is a sensitive and poignant indictment of the British governmental policies, Austerity and the War on Terror, which have served to exacerbate the marginalisation and oppression of Muslim communities living in the UK. Review by Julia Schouten

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Lane Meyer Projects, 2528 Walnut Street, Denver, CO 80205, USA

Green Gra$$

Dionne Lee, Breaking the Fall, 2016, (Diptych), archival inkjet print

The exhibition title alludes to the ways in which capitalism has become intertwined with a looming sense of environmental disaster in the age of the Anthropocene. Through collage, installation and sculpture, ‘Green Gra$$’ examines our cultural longing for a future that is already lost. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

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Central Pavilion, Arsenale, Venice, Italy

Venice Biennale 2019: Jon Rafman: Dream Journal

Dream Journal 2016-2019, 58. Esposizione Internazionale d'Arte - La Biennale di Venezia, May You Live In Interesting Times

The feature film ‘Dream Journal’ presented at the Venice Biennale is the result of three years of exploration into 3D simulated environments (2016-2019). Throughout an extremely dense 94 minutes, Rafman radically experiments with imaginary worlds populated by a plethora of obscene biotech mutants. CGI reveals the dark vitality of techno-materialism that melds post-human forms with chimerical beasts, monstrous insects and Japanese sexual perversions. Review by Piotr Bockowski

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Matt's Gallery, 92 Webster Road, London SE16 4DF

Susan Hiller: Ghost / TV

Susan Hiller, Ghost / TV, 2019, installation view.

At the time of Susan Hiller’s death earlier this year, she was working on a new show for Matt’s Gallery, the tiny Bermondsey gallery with which she had a decades-long working relationship. The resulting show has come about in collaboration with Hiller’s son, Gabriel Coxhead. Review by Lucy Holt

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