Viewing articles tagged with 'Film'

Centrala, Unit 4 Minerva Works, 158 Fazeley Street, Birmingham B5 5RT

SEVENTEEN

Olga Grotova, One (2016)

The centenary of the Russian Revolution is being celebrated in various exhibitions and cultural events this year. ‘Seventeen’ at Centrala more obliquely explores what a centenary of such significance might mean through the work of three UK-based Russian artists, Olga Grotova, Yelena Popova and Nika Neelova. Review by Jessie Bond

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Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Jamie Crewe: Female Executioner

Jamie Crewe, Female Executioner, 2017. Installation view.

‘Female Executioner’ translates the 1884 work, ‘Monsieur Venus: A Materialist Novel’, into compact visual sequences theatrically staged across the sparse Gasworks gallery. Review by Ashley Janke

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Frith Street Gallery, Soho Square (60 Frith Street), London

Adrian Paci / Giuliana Racco: Another Place

The Guardians

Informed by Adrian Paci's personal history of exile from Albania to Milan in 1997 during an armed uprising, he is characteristically drawn to dislocating the viewer and exploring the ambiguities of space, and the intersection between fact, fiction, reality and fantasy. His work has found a suitable counterpart in Giuliana Racco. Review by Cleo Roberts

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The Third Line, Warehouse 78 & 80, Street 8, Al Quoz 1, Alserkal Avenue Dubai, UAE

Sophia Al-Maria: EVERYTHING MUST GO

Sophia Al-Maria EVERYTHING MUST GO, installation view at The Third Line, Dubai 2017. Courtesy the artist and The Third Line.

Sophia Al-Maria's exhibition at The Third Line creates an immersive experience, capturing the chaotic, almost apocalyptic act of consuming. The viewer is invited to experience illusions of order in underlying confusion and pandemonium.

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New Art Exchange, 39-41 Gregory Boulevard, Nottingham, NG7 6BE

UNTITLED: art on the conditions of our time

UNTITLED: art on the conditions of our time, installation view at New Art Exchange, 2017

UNTITLED provides a number of guilty pleasures. Opening with Harold Offeh's video Covers Playlist (2016), in which a slightly over the hill man works on his disco diva moves, the show manages to maintain that identity politics can be playful as well as a serious subject. Review by Piers Masterson

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Centre for Contemporary Arts, 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

Forms of Action

Asuncion Molinos Gordo, Contestador (Answerphone), 2016, installation view at Forms of Action, CCA Glasgow

‘Forms of Action’ presents the work of seven artists whose actions in society are the core of their practice. Each with rich cultural, historical and political backdrops, this assembly of artists is, in itself, a timely form of action. Review by Kate Self.

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Plymouth University, Roland Levinsky Building, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA & Plymouth Arts Centre, 38 Looe St, Plymouth PL4 0EB

Malcolm Le Grice: Present Moments and Passing Time

Present Moments and Passing Time, installation view at Plymouth Arts Centre, 2017

Both a prolific and experimental artist, Malcolm Le Grice has amassed an innovative body of work throughout his career. Now considered a pioneer of British Expanded Cinema, the Plymouth-born artist has explored diverse territory over the years, the results of which have been brought together in a new exhibition, ‘Present Moments and Passing Time’. Review by Eva Szwarc.

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South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UH

Amie Siegel: Strata

Amie Siegel, Quarry, 2015. HD video, colour and sound. Exhibition view South London Gallery, 2017

Siegel probes ideas of value, wealth, attraction and symbolism through her work, presenting a layering of geological and allegorical strata which gives the exhibition its title. Review by Jillian Knipe

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J Hammond Projects, Unit 2B2 Bomb Factory, Boothby Road, London N19 4AJ

Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight)?

Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight) J HAMMOND PROJECTS

The objects we choose to accumulate and surround ourselves with represent a manicured veneer, and what we throw away is more revealing. Isn’t it more exciting to think about how someone would rather not be perceived? Liam Hess considers group exhibition 'Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight)?'

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Breese Little, Unit 1, 249 - 253 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 6JY

Parallax scrolling

Parallax scrolling, Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague, Installation View

‘Parallax scrolling’ is an exhibition that proposes a series of visual tactics by artists Nicholas Hatfull, Lauren Keeley and Jackson Sprague. These invite viewers to engage with perception and perspective by utilising simple optical devices, drawing our attention to the process of representation. Review by Cristina Ramos González

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Tenderpixel, 8 Cecil Court, London WC2N 4HE

Tropical Hangover

Tropical Hangover, installation view.

In the hot, damp climate of the rainforest, no sooner than an animal or plant dies, it begins to decay, feeding the maggots and soil from which new life grows. The tropics are an uncompromisingly ugly environment. The notion of nature’s immutable beauty is a human construction; one, as Tenderpixel’s group show ‘Tropical Hangover’ reveals, perpetuated by art. Henry Broome reviews

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Centro de Arte Andaluz Contemporáneo (CAAC) and Sala de Exposiciones Santa Inés, Seville

Leonor Serrano Rivas: Decorative Elements and Recurrent Patterns

One way to approach the recent body of work from Leonor Serrano Rivas is to understand it as a deconstruction of sorts of what would make a theatrical event. The Spanish artist has presented three key elements of a theatre play – the stage, the costumes and the backdrop – across two venues. Text by Lorena Muñoz-Alonso.

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Pump House Gallery, Battersea Park, London SW11 4NJ

Pilvi Takala: The Committee

Pilvi Takala, detail of The Committee project, 2013-2017, Pump House Gallery, London.

Pilvi Takala's ‘The Committee’ is a charming and timely exhibition that comments on the value of creativity for children, the opportunities it affords them and, significantly, is told from their perspective. Bobby Jewell reviews

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