Jerwood Arts, 171 Union Street, London, 9 December 2019

Symposium: Array presents ‘If you don’t play the game, don’t make the rules’

‘If you don’t play the game, don’t make the rules’ is a symposium presented by Belfast-based artist collective Array as part of their commission for the exhibition Jerwood Collaborate! at Jerwood Arts. This symposium expands on their collective research into current activism in Northern Ireland around LGBTQ+ rights, feminism and anticolonialism.

Array invites artists and activists from different generations to directly address current and future issues within Northern Ireland, platforming voices that fall outside current sectarian narratives.Speakers include Northern Irish curator, activist and community organiser Jane Wells (Chair) with feminist activist and writer Ann Rossiter, queer drag artist Electra La C*nt, Deputy Leader of the Green Party in Northern Ireland Malachai O’ Hara, and journalist, broadcaster and author Una Mullally.

Jerwood Collaborate! is a major group exhibition presenting commissions by early-career artists working in collaborative and collective practices based across the UK. It was presented at Jerwood Arts from 2 October – 15 December 2019. The exhibition responds to research about the challenges faced by early-career artists working in collaboration and provides a dedicated high-profile opportunity that supports and promotes this method of artistic practice. It features four new commissions by Array, Keiken + George Jasper Stone, Languid Hands and Shy Bairns, contributing to critical dialogues about collaborative and collective practices in the visual arts sector.

Array

Array is a collective of artists rooted in Belfast who together create collaborative actions in response to the socio-political issues affecting Northern Ireland. Array’s studios and project space act as a base for the collective, however participating artists are not limited to studio holders. Embracing humour and a DIY sensibility, Array’s art/activism focuses on projects that involve and benefit the wider community. Partnering with a range of creative individuals and organisations they merge artistic expression, participate in direct action and instigate public interventions across urban environments. Individual members work in performance, photography, print, installation and video and have exhibited and collaborated throughout the UK, Ireland and internationally, giving global focus to marginalised communities in Northern Ireland.

Schedule

  • Tue 25 October 2022

    Art Night / performance commission by Tai Shani at Fabric, London

    Art Night and the Museum of London are pleased to announce the presentation of a new performance commission by Tai Shani at Fabric, London this Autumn, at 8pm on 25th October. The performance will take the form of a chamber play and is Shani’s first major performance project since DC: Semiramis for which she was nominated and collectively won the Turner Prize in 2019. It will be one of her most ambitious works to date. The collaboration is a precursor to Art Night’s transition to a national, biennial contemporary art festival, with the first new model festival planned for 2023 and to be announced in the Autumn. This work by Tai Shani will be re-staged for the 2023 festival.

    The play will premiere at London’s iconic nightclub Fabric, adjacent to West Smithfield, the Museum of London’s soon-to-be new home. The special “one-night only” show will be broadcast live on digital channels to enable access for a global audience with the assistance of media partner This is Tomorrow. My bodily remains, your bodily remains, and all the bodily remains that ever were, and ever will be. (Down, skin, pelt, vellum, alert tangled roots, subcutaneous flesh, subterranean blind life) draws upon Smithfield’s history as one of London’s earliest execution sites and oscillates between somatic histories of political evil and love as an emancipatory power.

    The collaboration also celebrates the Museum of London’s impending relocation to West Smithfield and follows the launch of the Museum of London Docklands’ major exhibition Executions, which traces the history of public executions from the 12th to the 19th century.

    My bodily remains, your bodily remains, and all the bodily remains that ever were, and ever will be. (Down, skin, pelt, vellum, alert tangled roots, subcutaneous flesh, subterranean blind life) is inspired by various sources; classic works of literature including Destroy, She Said by Marguerite Duras, the writing of scholars including Jackie Wang and works by filmmakers such as Jacques Rivette. Shani’s commission is a poetic meditation on various historical resistance movements and groups, the spiritual dimensions of anti-supremacism, intersectional queer feminism, communism and revolutionary thinking to recognise the emancipatory power of love and pleasure as a catalyst for radical change.

    Typical of Shani’s practice, My bodily remains, your bodily remains, and all the bodily remains that ever were, and ever will be will deploy a skillful interplay of dialogue and narration. Shani will use recurring moods and motifs to explore eroticism, dark powers, mystical experiences, feminist theory and the theme of Revolution – embodied in this performance as a ghost.

    The play will feature an original live score composed by Shani’s long term collaborator Maxwell Sterling and Richard Fearless (Death in Vegas) alongside digital animations by Adam Sinclair also Shani’s long term collaborator. The play will also feature jewellery and set design by Shani.

    The commission is accompanied by a dedicated creative engagement programme developed in collaboration with All Change led by arts educator and creative producer Dhiyandra Natalegawa. The creative engagement programme will consist of a series of participant-led workshops and creative outcomes, shaped around the key themes and creative approaches in Shani’s work. The project is part of All Change’s B Creative programme: an arts activism programme for young women by young women, working with inspiring artists.