Viewing articles from 2019/02

dlr Lexicon, Haigh Terrace, Moran Park, Dún Laoghaire, Ireland

Paul Hallahan & Lee Welch: And the tide was way out

Paul Hallahan & Lee Welch: And the tide was way out, dlr Lexicon, 2019

In ‘And the tide was way out’ we are presented with two distinct approaches by the artists to painting, and while they converge in two works at the centre of the main gallery space, their divergence dominates the duo exhibition. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2PH

Jeff Koons

Gazing Ball (Rubens Tiger Hunt)

There’s a frustrating quote from Jeff Koons in the catalogue accompaniment to a new exhibition of his artwork at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. “I’ve tried to make work,” it says, “that any viewer, no matter where they came from […] would have to say that on some level “Yes, I like it.” If they couldn’t do that, it would only be because they had been told they were not supposed to.” Review by Rowland Bagnall

Further reading +

Collective, City Observatory, 38 Calton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA

Emmie McLuskey: these were the things that made the step familiar

these were the things that made the step familiar, Collective, 2019

The eight large scale screen print collages, audio works, printed matter and gymnastic ‘furniture' that make up Glasgow-based artist Emmie McLuskey's installation at Collective look at the shared poetics of the filmmaker and choreographer by analysing, describing and recording the body, through its interactions and its gestures, between rest and motion. Review by Alex Hetherington

Further reading +

25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

Cécile B. Evans: AMOS’ WORLD

Cecile B. Evans, AMOS' WORLD, Tramway (2019).

‘AMOS’ WORLD’ is a highly staged, three-part, telepathic and narcissistic TV soap opera, strewn with the vernacular of a therapy session and the persuasive mantras of the executive suite, the property developer and the city planner. Review by Alex Hetherington

Further reading +

The Photographers' Gallery, 16-18 Ramillies St, Soho, London W1F 7LW

All I Know Is What’s On The Internet

Degoutin & Wagon, World Brain, 2015, HD Video. All I Know Is What Is On The Internet, on display at The Photographers' Gallery until 24 February 2019.

To this exhibition’s immense credit, it avoids engaging in knee-jerk satire of the American President. Instead, his words serve as a jumping-off point to consider the blurrier than ever line between fact and fiction, and the changing nature of ‘the image’. Review by Adam Heardman

Further reading +

Cooper Gallery, 13 Perth Rd, Dundee DD1 4HT

Phil Collins: Ceremony

Phil Collins, Ceremony, 2018. Installation view Cooper Gallery, Dundee, 2019.

Visual artist and filmmaker Phil Collins’ journalistic video essay ‘Ceremony’ (2018) is structured as a complex melding of transnational road movie, rumination on the (in)visibility of public monuments, archival political portrait and ideological time/image/ machine. Review by Alex Hetherington

Further reading +

Koenig Gallery, 121, Alexandrinenstraße 118, 10969 Berlin

Helen Marten: Fixed Sky Situation

People, terms in barking (us)

For her most recent exhibition titled ‘Fixed Sky Situation’ at Koenig Galerie, Turner and Hepworth Prize winner Helen Marten presents eight new works, including three complex installations and five large paintings that circle the space like secular polyptychs. Review by Anais Castro

Further reading +

MO Museum, Pylimo g. 17, Vilnius 01141, Lithuania

All Art Is About Us

Installation view, All Art is About Us exhibition, MO Museum, Vilnius.

The inaugural exhibition, ‘All Art is About Us’, is made up predominantly of painting, video installation and photography from the museum’s collection of Lithuanian art. Review by Gulnaz Can

Further reading +

The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Rachel Maclean: The Lion and The Unicorn

The Lion and The Unicorn, Rachel Maclean, 2012

Maclean’s video work was created in the frenzied build up to the Scottish referendum, and sees the lion and unicorn from the Royal Coat of Arms personified by the artist in outrageously lurid get-up, lampooning the ridiculous regalia of power. Review by Clare Robson

Further reading +