Viewing articles from 2018/03

Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 140 George St, The Rocks NSW 2000, Australia

21st Biennale of Sydney: SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

21st Biennale of Sydney, SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement installation view

Artistic Director Mami Kataoka utilizes the concept of Superposition as a metaphor for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Superposition is a theory borrowed from quantum mechanics, it posits that different, even seemingly conflicting, components are held in suspension - equal in their difference and vital to the whole. This metaphor seeks to bring the different threads, directions, contradictions and loose-ends that exist in our contemporary world into a (utopian) balance. Review by Kathleen Linn

Further reading +

KARST Gallery, 22 George Pl, Plymouth PL1 3NY

Assembled Spaces

Assembled Spaces at KARST Gallery, 2018 installation view

Assembled Spaces brings together the work of Tine Bay Lührssen, Nina Brauhauser and Ilka Helmig in their UK debut. The artist trio combine photography, sculpture and traditional and digital drawing with a considered harmony in the arrangement of the works. They zigzag between each other, creating a visual conversation which dictates no linear instructions, nor a start or end point, to the viewer’s navigation. Review by Eva Szwarc

Further reading +

Cordova, Carrer de Portugalete, 15, 08014 Barcelona, Spain

Siera Hyte: Honey Week

Installation view, Siera Hyte: Honey Week, Cordova Gallery

Inspired by ‘The Butterfly’s Evil Spell’ (1920), Federico Garcia Lorca’s first ever play, Sierra Hyte’s ‘Honey Week’ is an invitation to participate in an almost theatrical setting in which humans, animals and creatures alike are welcome to partake of the space. Review by Marta Faria

Further reading +

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5 - 9 Temple Bar, Dublin 2, Ireland

Katrina Palmer: The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier

Katrina Palmer, The Time Travelling Circus: The Recent Return of Pablo Fanque and the Electrolier, 2018, Installation view, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Her two-tone and inverted printing, combined with these notations, help turn the map into a celestial chart for navigating the tale. Along with this map, Palmer presents a pair of audio recordings, featuring a ‘silent’ reading room within the gallery, circus tunes, sampled music, as well as a dual voice recording. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

Further reading +

Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Actions. The image of the world can be different

Installation view, Rana Begum

Kettle's Yard in Cambridge re-opens following a multi-million pound redevelopment of its galleries and public spaces and takes this question, and its possible answers, as a starting point. It features the work of 38 practitioners whose works fill the galleries, the on-site historic house and a nearby church, as well as occupying space online and being emblazoned on the uniform of the front of house staff. This exhibition is expansive. Review by Ryan Hughes

Further reading +

Museum Voorlinden, Buurtweg 90, 2244 AG Wassenaar, The Netherlands

Martin Puryear

Martin Puryear 2018 Voorlinden Museum installation view

The arrangement of the Voorlinden Museum’s current exhibition, Martin Puryear, surprises and makes it a delight to behold. Whereas the first half of the presentation is dominated by polychromed sculptures, natural wood surfaces predominate in the second half. A key feature of the layout is that it eschews a chronological ordering which urges viewers to seek out aspects that highlight alternate paths of development. Review by John Gayer

Further reading +

out_sight, GF, 12, Changgyeonggung-ro 35ga-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul, S.Korea

Mitra Saboury: Filthy Middles

Installation view, Mitra Saboury, Filthy Middles, Out_Sight Gallery, Seoul

Cleaning as we know it secures a homogeneous space that is removed of all otherness. However, when Mitra Saboury rubs, flosses, dusts and swipes things in her videos, her body as the subject of cleaning ends up revoltingly contaminated with the filth. Instead of eliminating dirt and grime, Saboury’s body becomes part of the mess. Text by exhibition curator, Jinho Lim.

Further reading +

Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W 17th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

A Lost Future

A Lost Future, 2018 installation view

Currently at the Rubin Museum, New York, is A Lost Future, a yearlong exhibition on view through January 28th, 2019, showcasing explorations of the future, a theme that in this context is applied specifically to Bengal and South Asia by Shezad Dawood, Matti Braun, and the Otolith. Review by Louis Soulard

Further reading +

Maureen Paley, 21 Herald Street, London E2 6JT

Kaye Donachie: Silent As Glass

Kaye Donachie, Silent As Glass, exhibition view, Maureen Paley, London 2018

Over the course of her career, Donachie’s work has developed from group depictions of nymph-like youths in a variety of natural settings, including campfires and caves, and hinting at tribal undertones in warm earthy colours, to the caged, closely framed portraits of women in domestic surroundings, even if these are only suggested, we see today. Review by Rosanna van Mierlo

Further reading +

Pi Artworks, 55 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EG

Ipek Duben: in via incognita

Installation view: Ipek Duben, in via incognita, 2018.

“We were human beings once”; “Now he could start a new life”. These are two separate sentences from testimonials scrolling down on a large projection in Pi Artworks London’s back wall. The rest of the exhibition ‘in via incognita’ by Ipek Duben consists of what that semicolon represents: the in-between of having been human once and the possibility of starting a new life. Text by Gulnaz Can

Further reading +