Viewing articles from 2018/02

Pump House Gallery, Battersea Park, London SW11 4NJ

Sriwhana Spong: a hook but no fish

Sriwhana Spong, a hook but no fish installation view, 2017.

Sophie Risner reviews a presentation of work by Sriwhana Spong which takes the work of twelfth century female mystic named Hildegard von Bingen as its central reference point.

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Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, S Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice

Susan Philipsz: A Single Voice installation view

Susan Philipsz’s work has often been described as a form of ‘sound sculpture’ that you hear long before you see it. The exact significance behind A Single Voice is not perfectly clear. Philipsz has pointed out that the apocalyptic story of Aniara holds just as much relevance today as when the poem was first written in 1956 (arguably more), and the mournful quality of the deconstructed violin combined with the player’s stark isolation as she accompanies an invisible, inaudible orchestra through her headphones, could almost be read as a last chilling goodbye to the human race as it peters into extinction. Review by Sara Jaspan

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Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham NG1 2GB

From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories from Across the Arab World

Joe Namy, Red Filled the Intervals; Between the Musical Notes, 2017/2017. Courtesy of the artist. Installation shot, From Ear to Ear to Eye, Nottingham Contemporary, Dec 2017- Mar 2018. Photo Stuart Whipps.

‘From Ear to Ear to Eye: Sounds and Stories From Across the Arab World’ at Nottingham Contemporary explores sound, music and listening in the Arab world, revealing different layers of meaning, intertwined histories, complicated political situations and complex questions. This expansive exhibition spreads across six rooms and showcases works by almost 20 artists who work with sound, are musicians or explore oral stories. Review by Roma Piotrowska

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Hauser & Wirth London, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Monika Sosnowska: Structural Exercises

Installation view, Monika Sosnowska. Structural Exercises, Hauser & Wirth London,  1 December 2017 to 10 February 2018

Monika Sosnowska is known for turning space into her canvas and the exhibition of new work by the artist currently on show at Hauser & Wirth’s space in Savile Row is no different. Titled ‘Structural Exercises,’ it is both a display of sculptures and an immersive installation – large scale structures extend in space so ambitiously as to transcend the boundaries between each other. Review by Anya Smirnova

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Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre, Gibbet Hill Rd, Coventry CV4 7AL

Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

Installation view, Clare Woods: Reality Dimmed

The internet and advertising provide us with a constant barrage of images. In the face of this mass it can be hard to find meaning. Clare Woods' current exhibition at Mead Gallery is a direct refusal of this position. She presents only a handful of works to allow us a clarity of vision which is incredibly refreshing. Review by Ryan Hughes

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Chiba City Museum of Art: 3 Chome-10-8 Chuo, Chiba, Chiba Prefecture 260-0013, Japan

Tsuyoshi Ozawa: Imperfection: Parallel Art History

Imperfection

Tsuyoshi Ozawa not only interrogates modern Japanese art history, illuminating the unique and sometimes odd pathways it has taken, he also questions the acts of looking and showing. He is distinct from Takashi Murakami, who proudly proclaimed the value of forgotten history by pushing anime-like figures to the forefront. Ozawa keeps an unstable and ambiguous position, enjoying the diverse and imaginative visions sustained by his perspicacity and sense of humour. Review by Kodama Kanazawa

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Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke St, Oxford OX1 1BP

Hannah Ryggen: Woven Histories

Ethiopia / Etiopia

Six years before her death in 1970, Ryggen became the first female artist to represent Norway at the Venice Biennale, and, in more recent years, has been the subject of several important retrospectives. As the relationship between politics and the public continues to find its twenty-first century feet, the uncompromising boldness of Ryggen’s tapestries, seen in her current exhibition, Woven Histories, at Modern Art Oxford, and their gentle interrogation of questions concerning nationality, identity, inequality and storytelling seem all too strangely close to home. Review by Rowland Bagnall

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