Viewing articles from 2017/05

The Sunday Painter, 1st Floor, 12-16 Blenheim Grove, London SE15 4QL

Assorted Paper

Installation view, Assorted Paper, The Sunday Painter

The gallery plays host to a number of works, all wrestling with different aspects of the material, and manages to arrange them in a way that provokes dialogue between the works without it being overwhelming. There is a mixture of surprising and expected responses to working with paper. Review by Jesc Bunyard

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Furtherfield Gallery, The McKenzie Pavilion, Harringay, London N4 2NQ

PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.

Refugee Flag, Installation view at Furtherfield Gallery, 2017

‘PLEASE IDENTIFY YOURSELF.’ announces itself with a song and a flag. Yara Said’s ‘Refugee Nation’ flag, designed in lifejacket orange for stateless participants of the 2016 Olympics, floats over the small pavilion in Finsbury Park housing Furtherfield Gallery. Review by David Morris

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CCA Glasgow, 350 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3JD

The Sky is Falling

Laura oldfield ford, radiant futures, sound and mixed media, 2017.

The Sky is Falling is concerned with city spaces as the site for utopias, dreams and social visions. Meanwhile, it documents the abrasive and contradictory experiences of citizens as the potential that urban utopias offer declines and fails. Review by Alexander Hetherington

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Castor, Enclave 8, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Jack West: Time and Attendance

Jack West: Time and Attendance, Castor

The videos exist in a digital purgatory with nothing around them apart from pixels and hyperbolic colour palettes emulating materials we know. Review by William Davie

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Barbican Centre, Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945. Installation View, Barbican Art Gallery, London, 23 March - 25 June 2017

This is an exhibition that, alongside showing ground breaking architectural designs and their socio-economical contexts, attempts to dig deeper into the psyche of the Japanese family. Spread across two floors centred around a courtyard with lovingly reconstructed walk-through models of contemporary Japanese rooms, the show allows us to sense what it’s like to live in these finest examples of nanotecture. Review by Dominika Mackiewicz

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